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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

January 31, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel. 

Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Brown, Croce, 
Crowley, Emerson, Freche.tte, Gordon, 
Haigis", Kiernan, Lambson, Lyons, 
Maginhis, McNamara, Plimpton, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, 
Dean Soutter, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Professor Shapiro, Planning 
Officer O'Brien and Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 
2:15 p.m. In the absence of the Chairman, Vice Chairman Healey 
presided. 

The minutes of the prior meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made and seconded, and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees of December 18, 1967. 



3025 



The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 

given by Chairman Troy. He stated Selective Merit In- 
s tings had been considered by the committee. The 
also reviewed general policies and procedures underlying 
r making these increments and felt that they were in line 
ies of comparable institutions. He drew attention to the 
iled and complete documentation supplied to the members 
rd and recommended approval of the listings. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

To approve the schedule of Selective Merit 
Increments, effective February 4, 1968, as 
contained in Document T68-044, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 



The Chairman then referred to Document T68-0+ 2 listing 
"maximum and minimum salary ranges," which the committee 
recommended be adopted. 



Policy was 
crement li 
committee 
methods fo 
with salar 
full, deta 
of the Boa 



VOTED : 



Previous 

Minutes 

Approved 



Report of 
Committee 
on Faculty 
and Educa- 
tional 
Policy 



Selective 

Merit 
Increments 



Maximum- 
Minimum 
Salary 
Ranges 



Promotions 
and Tenure 
UM/ Amherst 
UM/ Boston 



Professional 
Personnel 
Policy 
63-050 



Dental 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the maximum and minimum salary ranges 
shown in Document T68-042 be adopted. 

Chairman Troy submitted a list of promotions (Documents 
T68-045 and T68-046) which had been circulated to the members for 
consideration. After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : That the list of recommended promotions 
and tenure as shown on Document T68-045 
for Amherst and Document T68-046 for 
Boston be approved effective February 1, 
1968. 

Trustee Maginnis stated that every member of the committee 
would like to say they were very impressed by the amount of work 
done, the thoroughness and the extreme detail which went into 
preparation of the merit increment recommendations. 

Chairman Troy described a proposed change in the wording 
of the Professional Personnel Policies statement originally issued 
November 9, 1962. The reason for the change is to clarify the 
route of appeal, he said. An addendum would provide that wherever 
the document mentions "Provost," the word "Chancellor" shall be 
read for personnel matters at UM/Boston; and the title "Dean of the 
Medical School" shall be read for personnel matters on the Worcester 
campus. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That an addendum be added to Document 

63-050 dated November 9, 1962 entitled: 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES STATEMENT ON PRO- 
FESSIONAL PERSONNEL POLICIES AT THE 
•UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS; to incorporate 
changes as noted in the attached revised 
version of the document. 

Chairman Troy stated his committee had considered the re- 
port: "Survey of Dental Health Needs and Manpower in Massachusetts 
in the Years Ahead" as prepared by Dr. Raymond J. Nagle for the 
Board of Higher Education of the Commonwealth. This report states 
the urgent need for a new dental school in the Commonwealth and 
recommends that it be established by the University of Massachusetts 
in Worcester. Dean Soutter commented to the committee and agreed 
with the basic arguments and statistical analysis. He noted that 
it would be far less expensive to the State if the Dental School 
were included in the projected Medical School at Worcester, thus 
eliminating duplication of costs. He made special reference to 
laboratories which could be used by both schools at alternate times, 
bringing about considerable saving to the Commonwealth. In response 



3027 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



to a query, Dean Soutter stated that although addition of a Dental 
School would somewhat complicate plans in Worcester, it would not 
result in any serious delay to the timetable for the Medical School 
itself. 

President Lederle emphasized that incorporation of a 
Dental School with the Medical School would not delay the Medical 
School, but would bring about additional costs and result in a 
clear need for sufficient additional funding. While recognizing 
the need, the President pointed out that the University can act 
only if the taxpayers direct their elected representatives to 
establish the school, and the Legislature in turn communicates this 
direction to the University. 

In response to Trustee Frechette's question as to approxi 
mate cost of the Dental School, the President said he believed 
Dr. Nagle had provided the Board of Higher Education (for whom he 
made the survey) with figures. A Dental School is a rather costly 
school, although there are great advantages to establishing it at 
the same time as the Medical School. 

Chairman Troy summarized that if the State, the Governor, 
the Legislature, feels we need such a school, the Board members 
are indicating their willingness to undertake it. 

President Lederle said it is clear there is a need. But 
there are many needs in the Commonwealth, and how this proposal fit 
in is really a political question. He agreed that the University 
would be the logical repository of responsibility for the school 
in the event a decision is made to proceed. 

Trustee Croce felt that consideration of a Dental School 
might confuse and delay Medical School progress. He said the 
planning for the Dental School along with the Medical School might, 
in effect, raise a roadblock. He suggested that the Board of 
Trustees transmit its willingness to the Board of Higher Education 
rather informally instead of taking a formal vote. 

Chairman Healey requested Dean Soutter to advise the 
meeting what effect discussion of a Dental School might have on 
Medical School planning. Dean Soutter said it would have no effect 
He added that combining the Dental School with the plans would mean 
expanding the outpatient department and within the Medical School would 
require addition of another floor to the basic science wing and 
clinical wing, as well as some space at the end of the building, 
all in addition to what is now planned, so there would be no inter- 
ference. Dr. Soutter affirmed it would be desirable to plan a 
Dental School along with the Medical School if there is to be one, 
because they would have common facilities and common faculty. He 
stated, in response to Chairman Healey' s question as to whether 
there would be any impact on federal funding, that it would not 
interfere with the funding of the Medical School since the funding 
comes from another source. 



3028 



New 

Courses 
UM/ Bos ton 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 



Medical 
School - 
Revised 
Preliminary 
Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Frechette, in concurrence with Dr. Croce, stated 
that unless there is an urgency that requires taking an immediate 
position, it would be preferable in order not to confuse the situa- 
tion to get further along with the Medical School before consider- 
ing the Dental School. 

Chairman Healey said that to some extent the Trustees 
have had the matter thrust upon them. It is the clear intent of the 
Board to underline that the Medical School is the first responsi- 
bility. 

After further discussion, motion was made and seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To advise the Board of Higher Education 

that the University of Massachusetts will 
proceed to establish a Dental School as 
delineated in the Nagle Report, in con- 
junction with the Medical School in 
Worcester, if so directed by the Legisla- 
ture and the Governor, providing it would 
in no way delay plans for the Medical 
School. 

The Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy stated that the Chancellor and Acting Dean of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston had prepared and circulated to the 
committee a listing of new courses for the spring term, 1968 
(Documents T68-048 and T68-049) . The departments involved have 
carefully screened all material as have curriculum groups and other 
appropriate officials. Acceptance is recommended. 

On motion thereupon made, and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve new courses as detailed in 
Documents T68-048 and T68-049 which 
documents are herewith added to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was 
given by Chairman Haigis. He advised that necessary revisions had 
been made in the architect's plan for the Medical School. He asked 
Dean Soutter to display the revised plan and explain in detail to 
the Board the changes made in conformance with recommendations in 
order to secure appropriate approval for federal funding. After 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve Scheme 3, revised preliminary 
plans for the UM Medical School at 
Worcester, in accord with plan and draw- 
ings on file in the Office of the Dean for 
submission with the revised application 
for federal funds. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Haigis said that in order to provide classrooms, 
laboratories and offices in Worcester, pending the completion of 
the new structure, renovations to recently acquired property at 
419-421 Belmont Street would be necessary. In order to expedite 
this project, the committee recommended that the architects now 
retained for the Medical School design assume this additional work. 
On motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Commissioner of Ad- 
ministration and Finance that the archi- 
tects now working on the Medical School 
also design the renovations of the re- 
cently acquired property at 419-421 
Belmont Street and prepare it for occupancy. 

Chairman Haigis further reviewed the acquisition of the 
property at 419-421 Belmont Street in Worcester. After discussion 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
to offer to persons legally entitled there- 
to, an amount not to exceed Five Hundred 
Fifty Thousand ($550,000.00) dollars plus 
interest from the date of taking at the 
legal rate, as settlement in full for all 
damages resulting from the taking of the 
property located at 419-421 Belmont Street, 
Worcester, Massachusetts, by the Trustees 
of the University, by an order signed 
November 17, 1967, and recorded in the 
Worcester County Registry of Deeds as in- 
strument number 38360 on November 24, 1967. 

The Fraternity-Sorority Park group, Chairman Haigis said, 
has requested affirmation by the University of support in principle 
for their endeavor, which is development of the Fraternity-Sorority 
Park. There would be no implication of support or non-support of 
the fraternities or sororities included in the group. He then read 
the proposed resolve. President Lederle said that basically what 
is said is that if it will help to have assurance that everything 
being equal, and after we have met our residence hall obligations, 
we will send over any students who require such facilities. No 
financial obligation is involved. 

After further discussion, in which Chairman Healey 
commented this was formalization of an existing policy, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 



3029 



Architects 

Renovations 

Worcester 



Shaw 

Pinney 

Building 



Fraternity- 
Sorority 
Park 



3030 



Report of 

Finance 

Committee 



Budget 
Transfers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

RESOLVED: That the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts affirms the 
need for improved off-campus student 
housing in Amherst and accordingly 
supports in principle the proposals of 
Fraternity-Sorority Park, Inc. for the 
provision of such improved housing and, 
subject to the maintenance of the de- 
clared policy of the Board of Trustees 
to maintain full design occupancy of 
housing and dining facilities provided 
by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority and the University 
of Massachusetts Building Association, 
the good offices of the University should 
be extended to determine that fraterni- 
ties and sororities build, maintain, and 
operate on a sound financial basis houses 
that meet University living standards for 
the health and the safety of students. 
In the event that a fraternity or sorority 
which has built such a house fails to 
meet its financial obligations under its 
mortgage or lease commitments, after ex- 
hausting all means available to it to 
meet the same, the University will take 
such non-financial steps as may be appro- 
priate under the circumstances and con- 
sistent with the maintenance of the policy 
stated above to assign students to live in 
such house who will pay rent therefor, 
using such house for other than fraternity 
or sorority purposes. 

Chairman Pumphret of the Finance Committee advised that, 
with reference to Federal Fund reporting, opinion of the Attorney 
General has been requested along the lines of the recommendation of 
the auditor, so that when it is forthcoming there will be a meeting 
of the minds with the Legislature and the Governor, and it will be 
possible to move forward. 

He said, because there has been no action to date to 
supply supplemental budget funds, it has been necessary in order to 
continue the operations of the University, to transfer funds in 
accord with the detailed listing supplied to each member of the 
committee. The Chairman commented and explained the transfers, 
which included $60,000 to 03, to cover contractual services of 
custodial and security care for the three buildings leased for 
Boston. Also included were transfers for payroll and for the print- 
ing of admission forms and other administrative uses, for the Boston 
campus. In Amherst transfers were necessary for uniforms and other 
related equipment for the volunteer fire department and police and 
security guards at the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In order to continue academic programs and classes with- 
out curtailing student registrations in courses or shut down 
essential services such as the computer center, a transfer of 
$70,000 was necessary from 1350-01-08 to 1350-01-13 and 10. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the budget transfers for the 
fiscal year as detailed in Document T68- 
050 which document is herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

Chairman Pumphret advised that in order to authorize the 
Chancellor to sign certain documents rather than channel them to 
Amherst as had been the custom, a vote to establish a Trust Fund 
Account is required. A copy of the recommended vote was circulated 
to the members of the Board. After discussion, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To establish a Trust Fund account and a 

bank checking account in the State Street 
Bank and Trust Company, both entitled, 
"Student Activities Trust Fund - University 
of Massachusetts, Boston" on an imprest 
basis, the amount and accounting therefore 
to be determined by the Treasurer of the 
University; and to authorize the Chancellor, 
University of Massachusetts, Boston, to 
sign checks for disbursement from this 
account and/or to designate a member of 
his professional staff, after notification 
to the Treasurer, to draw and sign checks 
payable from the above account, provided 
that checks drawn in excess of $1,000.00 
are to be countersigned by the Chancellor. 
Also, to authorize the Chancellor to enter 
into and sign contracts or agreements per- 
taining to the above Student Activities 
Trust Fund account and/or to designate 
from time to time members of his pro- 
fessional staff to do the same. 

President Lederle presented personnel actions, copies of 
which had been supplied in advance of the meeting to the members 
of the Board. After comment, motion was made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the personnel actions 
as detailed in Documents T68-041, together 
with T68-047 and supplement #1, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was further 



3031 



Authorization 
for Chancellor 
to sign 
Documents 



UM/ Boston 
Trust Fund 
Account 



Personnel 
Actions 



3032 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without Tenure 



Classifica- 
tion of 
Position 
Titles 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure for the period 
December 19, 1967 to January 31, 1968 as 
detailed in Document T68-041A, which is 
herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
with respect to professional personnel under 
provisions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or de- 
termined shall be as hereafter determined 
by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 
Titles effective on and after February 4, 
1968, as detailed in Document T68-042, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 

Trustee Lyons gave the report of the delegate to the 
Board of Higher Education. In the absence of delegate Healey, 
Trustee Lyons had acted as alternate at a meeting held January 19. 
He stated that no action directly affecting the University was con- 
ducted at this meeting except one that affects all institutions, a 
recommendation for capital outlay fund for libraries of state 
colleges amended to include all institutions. This was put over to 
another meeting because a report of the library committee is due to 
come in. The Governor's committee on law enforcement plans special 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



police education courses, which the Chancellor said the Community 
Colleges would take on. Staffing has progressed to the point where 
standing committees can be disbanded and it was so voted at the 
meeting Trustee Lyons attended. 

Vice Chairman Healey stated he has been privileged to 
represent the Board of Trustees as the delegate to the Board of 
Higher Education for two years. He stated his feeling that it 
would be of great benefit to the Board of Higher Education and to 
the Board of Trustees of the University to elect a replacement 
delegate who would give new insight to these boards. He indicated 
his willingness to support the Board of Trustees' choice. Trustee 
Crowley, as Chairman of the Nominating Committee, thereupon 
nominated Trustee Louis Lyons to represent the Board of Trustees of 
the University on the Board of Higher Education. 

In conformance to section la of Chapter 572 of the Acts 
of 1965, it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To designate Trustee Louis M. Lyons of 

Cambridge as the University of Massachu- 
setts Board of Trustees' representative 
to the Board of Higher Education of the 
Commonwealth. 

Vice Chairman Healey directed Secretary McCartney to 
communicate this appointment to Chancellor Millard of the Board of 
Higher Education and arrange for Mr. Lyons to be sworn in, in the 
customary fashion by the Secretary of State. 

Vice Chairman Healey then appointed a committee to bring 
in to the annual meeting on February 19, 1968, nominations for 
officers of the Board of Trustees; said committee to provide a list 
of its nominations in writing to the Secretary at least ten days 
prior to said annual meeting. 

The following Trustees are members of the Nominating 
Committee: Messrs. Crowley, Chairman; Emerson and Troy. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 



3033 




Robert 
Secretary, 



Representative 
of Board of 
Higher 
Education 



Appointment 
of Nominating 
Committee 



034 



TRUSTEE 



Minutes 
Approved 

President' s 
Comments 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees 

February 19, 1968, 1:00 p.m., Whitmore Administration Building, 

Amherst, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Croce, Crowley, 
Emerson, Haigis, Healey, Lambson, 
Lyons, Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, 
Pumphret, Troy, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Acting Dean Gagnon, Planning 
Officer O'Brien, Miss Coulter; Members 
of the Press; Professor S. Shapiro, 
Faculty Senate; Miss Boronski, vice 
president Student Senate, Mr. J. Collins, 
President, Student Senate, Miss Michalenko 
and Mr. Bertucci. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was <&^t-]Lgd to order by 
Chairman Boyden at 1:30 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, a motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees of January 31, 1968. 

The President reported on the recent student picketing of 
the Dow Chemical Company representatives and the military recruiter 
in the Student Union. The pickets conducted themselves with de- 
corum, but, as the size of the group grew in the Student Union, the 
tenor of the crowd changed and the concern of the speakers shifted 
to include general protest of University policies. As a result of 
a continuing dialogue, during which Dr. Mark Noffsinger, Associate 
Dean of Students, stressed the need to show tolerance and respect 
for each others beliefs, an open meeting was arranged with the Presi' 
dent and other administrators for February 19 to allow opportunity 
for all to be heard. The President said he looked forward to the meet- 
ing, adding that it would afford an opportunity to learn the nature 
of some of the student complaints as well as for the students to 
learn some of the problems the University has in providing education 
for 15,000 students on the campus. 

President Lederle stated plans for the Medical School are 
being pursued assiduously. He asked Dean Soutter to describe 
current progress. 



3035 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Soutter stated a number of meetings have been held 
in Washington with officials of the Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare (HEW) to whom the University must apply for 
federal funds. The talks were successful. The second application 
has been well received and is moving ahead. The Dean cautioned, 
however, there is no guarantee of approval, but indications are 
that favorable progress is being made. 

Dean Soutter advised that the Medical School office in 
Worcester was officially opened today with the installation of a 
telephone and secretary. He stated also that 2,000 books a week 
are currently being sent to the Worcester headquarters to be stored, 
after processing and cataloguing. A large sign has been erected 
identifying the building as the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School. 

After March 1, the architects will begin redesign of the 
building at Belmont Avenue in order to accommodate the first year 
Medical School enrollment there. The Dean expressed optimism that 
the second year class would be able to open in the new building. 

Chairman Healey submitted the report of the Executive 
Committee. He said the basic subject for discussion at the recent 
meeting was the evolution of the Master Plan for the future of the 
University. The plan is currently being developed and considerable 
progress is being made. 

Chairman Boyden then called for the report of the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Chairman Haigis described the need for an expanded staff 
for the University at Boston in order to continue planning and de- 
velopment for the present campus, and also for the development of 
a new, permanent campus. After discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board anticipates that the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston will develop 
a staff appropriate for the present and 
future development and planning needs of 
that campus . 

Chairman Haigis then referred to a petition received from 
the "Northeast Quadrangle Presidents' Council - Housing Sub- 
committee," voicing objection to the proposed construction of resi- 
dence halls for 1970 in that location. Copies of this petition had 
been forwarded to the Trustees. Chairman Haigis stated that, 
although no vote would be required, the students representing the 
Northeast Quad had been invited to attend the meeting and present 
their points of view. Trustee Haigis then introduced Miss 
Michalenko, Mr. Bertucci and Miss Boronski. 



Application 



Worcester 
Office 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 
Master Plan 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings & 
Grounds 

UM/ Boston 



Northeast 

Quadrangle 

Petition 



3036 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Miss Michalenko stated the students had learned about the 
proposed dormitory construction for 1400 students in the quadrangle 
area of campus last October or early November. She stated the stu- 
dents like their quad very much as it is and averred an over- 
whelming majority of students were opposed to proposed construction 
plans which would change the whole nature of the area. Although 
887» of the residents signed a hastily circulated petition, an even 
greater number of signatures could have been secured had time per- 
mitted supporting opposition to placement of the 1970 residence 
halls in that location. 

Miss Michalenko said the administration had invited the 
petitioners to attend a showing of the architects plans. These were 
found to be most attractive, but still unwanted in the quadrangle, 
which she described as a "very nice place to live." This viewpoint 
was not solely initiated because of the impending plans for change, 
she said, but had been expressed during a survey conducted in a pre- 
vious year, as well. She described the area as homelike and not 
hectic. Miss Michalenko pointed out that 1400 extra students will 
double the occupancy of the quad area, where 1220 students now live, 
In addition, facilities at North Dining Commons will be badly 
cramped and the heavy increase of through traffic will create 
distractions including noise and lack of privacy, all of which will 
intrude on a proper study atmosphere. Miss Michalenko said it was 
felt untenable to object aesthetically though this too was a factor, 
Research was undertaken and statistics prepared which were supplied 
to the Trustees as Document T68-053, on which Mr. Bertucci was pre- 
pared to speak. 

Mr. Bertucci said the statistics were calculated to show 
that the effects of doubling student concentration in the area will 
be felt in: (1) damage and (2) academics. With reference to the 
first, he said male students are responsible for most damage. He 
compared the index of damage in traditional living areas to that 
in the high density areas. This indicated a damage cost ratio of 
34c per male student in the former, to $1.96 per student in the. 
latter. The semi-high-density areas, such as Orchard Hill, had a 
ratio of 65<; per male student. Although a minimum of damage occurs 
in women's dormitories, comparison there showed 5c per student in 
the traditional living atmosphere compared to 23c per woman student 
in high-density areas, - four times greater. The total, for high- 
density is $5,052, compared to $815 for traditional. Mr. Bertucci 
said the sensitive subject of elevator cost alone, shown on the re- 
port, is .034 per student, compared to .078. 

Mr. Bertucci went on to relate the percentage of dismissal 
(flunk outs) to pertinent areas (4.69 traditional; 6.18 per 100 in 
high density) . He attributed this to the noise and the great turn- 
over of residents in the Southwest area. He said that outside 
distractions, echoes and student traffic contributed to the noise 
and confusion. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Healey observed that these factors do not account 
for differences in behavior patterns. Mr. Bertucci expressed the 
view that in a large dormitory the residents are more anonymous and 
less apt to be observed as compared to the traditional dormitories 
where student assumption of responsibility is greater because the 
student is more easily identified with his indiscretions. 

President Lederle expressed interest in the statistics 
and said they would be further explored. He said that another 
factor influencing the figures in the Southwest area is the 
tendency for more freshmen to be residents there. Trustee Lyons 
observed that the older, traditional buildings seem generally to 
appeal also to a more conservative student. This might also be a 
factor reflected in the statistics. He agreed with Trustee Troy 
that the aesthetic considerations are also very important. 

Chairman Haigis pointed out that, although the Board is 
concerned with the aesthetic appeal of the construction, considera- 
tion must be given also to providing accommodations beyond the 
15,000 students now on campus, up to a possible 30,000. 

Miss Boronski, vice president of the Student Senate, ad- 
vised that these matters had also been brought into the service 
committee of the Student Senate. The Student Senate has voted to 
encourage the Trustees not to approve this particular site for the 
proposed new buildings. Miss Boronski said the Senate, composed 
of students from every area of campus, including the Southwest area 
all felt it important to stress the integrity of the Northeast Quad 
as a unit. 

Miss Boronski acknowledged the problem created by the in- 
creasing size of the University. She stressed the need to provide, 
in addition to high-density housing, areas of low-density housing 
adding there is tremendous merit to this type of housing. She ex- 
pressed the hope that the Board would give this matter serious con- 
sideration. Mr. Bertucci suggested the alternative of inviting 
private enterprise to make low cost housing available. He 
summarized that the whole point of the student presentation was to 
show that there are grounds for further study. 

President Lederle stated his appreciation of the desires 
and concerns expressed by the students. Trustee Healey stated: I 
think this is a fine dialogue between a group of students and the 
Board of Trustees. I am impressed with the presentation; with the 
way it came up, through channels and also the fine documentation. 
He expressed appreciation to the students for their willingness to 
come before the Board to discuss the matter. 

Trustee Lyons added that he was similarly impressed by 
the quality and good sense of the students who. had met with the 
Committee on Student Activities during the preceding week. 



3037 



3038 



Campus 
Boulevard 



State 
Nursery 



Naming of 
Buildings 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The final plans for the campus boulevard in Amherst, as 
prepared by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, were then submitted 
for consideration. Treasurer Johnson described the location of the 
boulevard. The Treasurer said the project will include completion 
of the mall east of Whitmore Administration Building. It will also 
include all lighting, landscaping, trees, sidewalks and curbing. 
He said appropriation has already been made for this million dollar 
project. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To accept the final plans for the Campus 
Boulevard - Amherst as submitted by the 
firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates. 

Chairman Haigis then submitted a recommendation that the 
Department of Natural Resources be requested to remove the state 
nursery from its present location on University property. He noted 
that this department is not controlled by the University. Considera 
tion is being extended to offering land elsewhere on University 
property. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To request the Department of Natural 

Resources to move the State Nursery from 
its present location on University 
property. 

Chairman Haigis then submitted for consideration the 
naming of two new buildings. The first, in honor of former 
Governor Christian A. Herter; the second in honor of former Governor 
Maurice J. Tobin. Both men were described as great friends of the 
University who had served with distinction as Governors of the 
Commonwealth as well as in the cabinet of two separate Presidents 
of the United States. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To name the building known as Bartlett 
East for CHRISTIAN A. HERTER and the 
building known as Bartlett West for 
MAURICE J. TOBIN. 

The Chairman then described progress on selection of a 
permanent site for the University at Boston. He said three meet- 
ings had been held with Messrs. Moynihan and Riesman (Harvard-MIT 
Joint Center of Urban Studies) in conjunction with consultants 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates. In addition, last Friday a meet- 
ing was held with Mr. Hale Champion the new administrator appointed 
by Mayor Kevin White to head the BRA. Mr. Champion has met with 
representatives of the University several times, Trustee Haigis 
said, but has been in office for so short a time he has not yet had 

an opportunity to study the matter thoroughly. Some things on both 
sides must be resolved, but we are moving ahead with dispatch. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Healey attended the Friday meeting, as a guest. 
Every site suggested was reviewed. There was opportunity for frank 
interchange with Mr. Champion. 

The report of the Student Activities Committee was given 
by Chairman Lyons. He said a meeting was held February 13 with 
members of the Faculty Senate and student government at the request 
of the administration. The issue was the extent of autonomy to be 
granted the individual residence house councils to determine the 
frequency of open house periods and whether room doors must be kept 
open during the visit. The meeting lasted two and a half hours and 
the entire proposal was thoroughly discussed. Chairman Lyons noted 
that according to Saturday's COLLEGIAN, the Faculty Senate had met 
and acted on the issue. The result was to meet the basic considera 
tions: doors must be kept open during visiting hours; autonomy of 
the residence house council must be exercised within established 
university regulations. The number of open houses allowed, when 
voted by individual houses, was increased to ten a month maximum 
(had been four). Chairman Lyons then drew attention to today's 
COLLEGIAN which reported the Student Senate had rejected this pro- 
posal. He concluded this means the deadlock continues. As the 
President had advised earlier, a meeting with the students is 
scheduled for this evening. 

Chairman Lyons again spoke of the fine quality of the 
student leaders who had attended the February 13 meeting of the 
Trustee Committee on Student Activities. He noted that two of these 
students, (President Collins and Miss Tracey) were leaders in 
assisting Associate Dean Mark Noffsinger in his very effective 
activity to bring Thursday's sit-in demonstration around to order. 

Chairman Lyons quoted a statement by Senate President 
Collins in the COLLEGIAN. .. ."those who wish only to embarrass 
others and exhale thoughtless slogans should aid the University by 
their non-attendance at the meeting. Whether they be students, 
faculty or administrators, such 'mediators' or 'leaders' should 
respect the intelligence of those present by neither seeking to 
pacify legitimate anger nor promoting demagogic excess..." (see 
attached) . Chairman Lyons also mentioned an editorial entitled 
THE DEMONSTRATORS by editor Wiernerman, in which he stated "a 
thoughtful re- examination on the part of each student at the Uni- 
versity regarding what should be his role as a student and what he 
should expect from his professors and administrators should precede 
any sharp and hopefully constructive criticism...." Chairman Lyons 
stated these matters were reported by him to show that there is 
some thoughtful, rational and useful leadership among the students. 



The Presidential agenda included Personnel Actions which 
had been circulated. The President moved their approval. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 



3039 






Report of 
Committee 
on Student 
Activities 



OPEN 
HOUSE 



Student 
Demonstra- 
tion 



3040 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To approve and confirm the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T68-052, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential Appoint- 
ments Without Tenure for the period February 1, 
1968 to February 19, 1968 as detailed in Docu- 
ment T68-052A, which is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject to 

the policies and procedures now in effect as sub- 
sequently amended, revised, added to or repealed 
by the Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 
fessional personnel under provisions of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and 
descriptive job specification for each position 
to which a member of the professional staff is 
hereby appointed, promoted, transferred or de- 
termined shall be as hereafter determined by the 
Board of Trustees or under their authority. 

The President next submitted the graduation list for the 
fall, which had been approved by the Faculty. He drew attention to 
the fact there were 16 doctorates awarded in this interim period, 
an indication of moving forward at the graduate level. The Presi- 
dent observed that eight years ago, when he joined the University 
administration, there were not this many doctorates awarded for the 
entire year. Now, this number is awarded almost on a semester basis 
with substantially more to follow at the June commencement. He ex- 
pressed satisfaction that the graduate students we are attracting 
move out to serve society in business, government and academic 
services. 



Motion was then made. 



seconded, and it was 



Graduate 
Degrees 



Undergraduate 
Degrees 



VOTED : To approve the list of candidates for advanced 
degrees set forth in Document T68-054 dated 
February 15, 1968, which document is attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the list of undergraduate degrees 

awarded as of February 1, 1968, as detailed in 
Document T68-055, which document is attached 
to and made a part of these minutes (also sheet 
#1 and #2 of changes) . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman of the Finance Committee then submitted for 
consideration a matter pending from the January 31 meeting of that 
committee. This was an unpaid legal bill of an estate of which the 
University had been a beneficiary. After discussion, motion was 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the principal of the Codding Endowment 
Fund be reduced by the sum of $564.00 in 
favor of paying legal expenses that were un- 
paid in error upon settlement of the Estate 
by the Fairfield County Trust Company. 

Chairman Pumphret advised the American Institute of Archi 
tects had presented the "1968 Gold Award to Architect Marcel Breuer 
and that an award had also been made to I. M. Pei and the allied 
professional medal to engineers LeMessurier Associates, Inc. of 
Boston. He further advised that Marcel Breuer' s representative 
during a visit to campus to check the details for the Campus Center 
reported that in his long experience he has never encountered a 
contractor who showed such detailed interest in the work as Daniel 
O'Connell & Sons who are currently carrying on construction. 

Trustee Lyons, as the delegate to the Board of Higher 
Education reported on a recent meeting. He said there were three 
actions of interest to the Board of the University. 

1. The BHE went on record in opposition to 
House 3103 - (to establish individual 
boards of trustees for certain state 
colleges) 

2. The BHE also stated opposition to the 
proposed change in name of the South- 
eastern Massachusetts Technological 
Institute to that of University. 

3. The BHE also recorded opposition to 
the proposed legislative investigation 
of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston. 

Chancellor Millard had written a letter to the Chairman 
of the Education Committee opposing the separate boards for certain 
state colleges. The BHE voted approval of a draft of its position, 
detailing the reasons for the opposition. Trustee Lyons read the 
conclusion to the draft which stated, 

"The concept of division in the current bill is 
a major step backwards and would harm the very 
institutions it is designed to help. That there 
are current tensions cannot be denied. Many of 
these are growing pains. The concept of system 
in public higher education in this state is new, 

it must be given opportunity to develop or the 
future for public higher education in Massachu- 
setts looks dark indeed..." 



3041 



Report of 

Finance 

Committee 



Codding 
Estate 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



o 



UM/ Bos ton 

Support 

Protest 



Report of 

Nominating 

Committe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The phrasing of the Board's position in opposition to the 
change of name of SMTI was left to the Chancellor after a consensus 
was reached that a change of name that implied change of character 
or function is inappropriate while the BHE itself is in the process 
of evaluating the whole state system of higher education. 

The phrasing was also left to Chancellor Millard on 
opposition to the threatened investigation of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. There was unanimous consensus in favor of 
a general statement of principle as follows: 

"To affirm that students and teachers in the 
state institution must be accorded no less 
freedom than is universally accepted for 
private colleges else they are assigned a 
position of second class citizenship which 
is intolerable." 

House Speaker Ouinn also has publicly stated he will try 
to defeat this "unwise and dangerous measure." This follows a pro- 
test by Chancellor Ryan and the faculty senate of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston opposing any intrusion into the academic 
freedom of this institution, or any harassment of its members. 
Trustee Lyons suggested it was highly appropriate for the Board of 
Trustees to go on record in full support of the protest and the 
position taken by the Chancellor and the faculty senate. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To support the position of protest taken 
by the Chancellor and Faculty Senate of 
the University at Boston with reference 
to a threatened legislative investigation 
of the UM at Boston faculty. 

Trustee Croce made the personal observation that he would 
support Chancellor Millard's statement with respect to freedom of 
expression in public institutions. But he stressed the importance 
of not equating this with supporting or condoning license without 
responsibility; to advocate what might be illegal, immoral, or even 
bad taste - which have been confused on recent occasions. The 
public university in recent past has seemed to be the victim of such 
abuses of freedom. Private institutions usually nip these indiscre- 
tions in the bud; public institutions seem helpless as they develop. 
He said he wished to state firmly that nothing said by him should 
be construed as anything but full support of Chancellor Millard's 
statement of freedom of expression in public institutions. Trustee 
Louis Lyons stated his complete support of Trustee Croce' s 
positions. 

Chairman Boyden then called for the report of the Nominat- 
ing Committee. This was presented by its chairman, Trustee Crowley. 
After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 
unanimous ly 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To elect the following officers of the Board 
of Trustees for the ensuing year: 

Chairman, Frank L. Boyden 
Vice Chairman, Joseph P. Healey 
Secretary, Robert J. McCartney 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 

It was also 

VOTED: To approve the list of committee chairmen 
and members of the committees of the Board 

detailed in Document T68-056, 
is herewith attached to and 



of Trustees as 
which document 



made a part of these minutes. 

President Lederle stated it should be a matter of record 
that in all his experience he has never seen a board of lay people 
that worked as hard as this Board has over the years. He said the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee particularly has three or four meet 
ings a month. The other committees hold meetings regularly, in 
addition to the monthly meeting of the full Board. The President 
said that in no case has the Board of Trustees or its committees 
been dilatory. Progress is being made on many difficult problems 
as rapidly as possible. 

Chairman Boyden then expressed his appreciation for the 
honor of serving as Chairman of the Board and for the opportunity 
to do so for so many many years. He noted the great advancement 
which has taken place. He expressed appreciation to the Board for 
their loyalty to the institution which they represent. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



3043 



Committees 
of Board of 
Trustees for 
1968 




Secretary/ Board of Truste 



;044 



TRUSTEE 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Prior Meeting 

President' s 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
March 22, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Acting Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Brown, Croce, 
Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, 
Greenblatt, Haigis, Laranbson, Lyons, 
Maginhis, McNamara, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo; Chancellor Ryan, Act- 
ing Dean Gagnon, Planning Officer 
O'Brien of UM at Boston; Professor 
Seymour Shapiro (Amherst Faculty 
Senate) ; Dean of the Graduate School 
Moore; Dr. D. Thompson (American 
Council on Education intern); Messrs, 
Sasaki, Chapman, Alexander of Sasaki. 
Dawson, DeMay Associates; representa- 
tives of the UM/Boston Student Site 
Committee, members of the Press, 
Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, in the absence of the Chairman, Vice 
Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been distri- 
buted, motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees of February 19, 1968. 

At the invitation of the Acting Chairman, President 
Lederle commented that a two million dollar federal grant had been 
awarded to the University toward construction of the new 28-story 
library on the Amherst campus. He also informed the Trustees of a 
site visit in connection with the second application filed with the 
Federal Government for funds for construction of the Medical School 
in Worcester. He expressed optimism that adequate support would be 
forthcoming as a result of this application. 

President Lederle informed the Board, with regret, that 
this meeting marked the end of Trustee Brown's long and dedicated 
service on the Board. He said that Mr. Brown had been. a great friend 
of the University, starting as a student leader, continuing as Presi 
dent of the Alumni Association, and for many years as a member of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Board of Trustees. The President expressed as well his deep 
personal appreciation for the friendship and loyalty of Trustee 
Brown and his wife, stating that Mr. Brown has been a conscientious 
member of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, which entailed 
attending the meetings held very frequently. 

Trustee Crowley then offered a resolution that the Board 
recognize the distinguished contribution of Trustee Brown by an 
appropriate written testimonial. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

RESOLVED - That the Board of Trustees express its 
affection, admiration, respect and good 
wishes to Harry Dunlap Brown, devoted 
alumnus and former legislator, as he 
leaves the Board of Trustees after 28 
years of dedicated public service to 
the Commonwealth and to the University 
of Massachusetts; and that his dis- 
tinguished contribution to higher educa- 
tion be recognized by the presentation 
of an appropriate written testimonial. 

Presentation was then made of an appropriately inscribed 
document in testimony of Mr. Brown's distinguished service. 

Chairman Healey called for the report of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Recommendations for tenure at Amherst and Boston were 
submitted by Chairman Troy. He advised all of these had been care- 
fully screened and evaluated in terms of established criteria. 
Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That tenure be granted to the members of 
the Amherst and Boston faculties as shown 
on Documents T68-058 and T68-059. 

Chairman Troy then described a recommended change in the 
policy statement on additional compensation (Document 63-062) as a 
result of a study made by the Committee on Sponsored Research of 
the American Council on Education. The recommended change has been 
in actual practice at the University, and it is now proposed to 
change the policy statement to conform. Chairman Troy said the 
original policy (1963) authorized faculty to earn additional com- 
pensation from sponsored research in an amount not exceeding 25% of 
current salary which could be earned during the academic year. The 
policy followed at the University recommends that additional com- 
pensation from research grants be earned only during the summer 
months. Faculty members on 12-month appointment basis may not re- 
ceive additional compensation to the budgeted salary. 



3045 



Harry Dunlap 
Brown - 
Resolution 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Tenure 
UM/ Amherst 
UM/ Boston 

Policy on 

Compensation 

for Certain 

Additional 

Professional 

Services 



3046 



Document 
T68-060 



Policy on 
Preventing 
Conflicts of 
Interest in 
Government 
Sponsored 
Research 
T68-061 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the altered policy on compensa- 
tion for certain additional professional 
services as shown on Document T68-060, with 
the word "ordinarily" struck on page 2 as 
shown on the attached document. 

The Chairman then discussed the Conflict of Interest 
Policy memorandum (Document T68-061) prepared by the Dean of the 
Graduate School, as Chairman of the University Research Council. 
He advised that this statement of policy has been approved by the 
University Research Council, the Faculty Senate and is now 
recommended by the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To adopt the Policy on Preventing Conflicts 
of Interest in Government Sponsored Research 
at the University of Massachusetts. 

1. The principal investigator of any 
sponsored research project is required 
to report to the Dean of the Graduate 
School all consultantships which appear 
directly relevant to his research. 

2. The principal investigator will confer 
with the Dean of the Graduate School as 
a source of advice and guidance for ad- 
vance consultation on questions involving 
possible conflict-of-interest situations. 

3. A copy of the American Council on Educa- 
tion—American Association of University 
Professors policy statement on "Prevent- 
ing Conflicts of Interest in Government 
Sponsored Research at Universities" will 
be given to each faculty member receiving 
a government grant. 

Chairman Troy then submitted the recommendation of the 
committee to establish, for the post-doctoral fellows on campus, a 
category to be known as the "Post Doctoral Research Associate." 
(See Document T68-062) . The purpose of this category is to allow 
the persons so designated to be treated as faculty, so far as per- 
quisites are concerned. This would include use of library, labora- 
tory facilities, faculty housing priorities, parking permission, 
membership in Faculty Club, but would not include voting privileges 
nor tenure credit. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That a category to be known as Post Doctoral 
Research Associate be established. Holders 
of such title are to be appointed by the 
Board of Trustees with the recommendation of 
the Graduate Dean. 

Chairman Troy next apprised the Trustees of the recommenda 
tion to divide the present Department of Entomology and Plant 
Pathology into two administrative and academic departments. He 
stated this would repair an error made some years ago when these 
two unrelated disciplines were joined. The Chairman advised the 
department has also fallen behind in acquisition of modern equip- 
ment. The separation is recommended as the first step in improving 
the overall situation. After discussion, motion was made, seconded 
and it was 

VOTED : That the Department of Entomology and 
Plant Pathology be abolished and that 
the Department of Plant Pathology and 
Department of Entomology be established. 

Trustee Gordon inquired as to the effect this would have 
on the field station in Waltham. The Provost stated that Waltham 
was an entirely separate department. 

A proposal to offer a Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in Comparative Literature was described by Chair- 
man Troy. It was noted that the development of this program has 
been a dramatic one throughout the country. It was also stated 
that graduate studies in Comparative Literature would attract quali 
fied students in substantial numbers. After discussion and on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the Proposal to Offer Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in 
Comparative Literature (Document T68-063) . 

A proposal for a two year graduate program leading to the 
degree of Master of Regional Planning was described by Chairman 
Troy (Document T68-064) . He stated the recommendation for this pro 
gram came about because of (1) impact of urban areas on the rural 
region and the fact that very few programs in this area of planning 
are offered and also (2) there is a real need to strengthen the 
existing University programs. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To establish a two-year terminal graduate 
program in Regional Planning leading to 
the professional degree, Master of Re- 
gional Planning. 



3047 



Post-Doctoral 

Researdh 

Associate 



Establishment 
of Separate 
Departments 
of Entomology 
and Plant 
Pathology 



Waltham 

Field 

Station 



Master of 

Arts and 

Doctor of 

Philosophy 

in Comparative 

Literature 



New Program 

Master of 

Regional 

Planning 



3048 



Latin 
Courses 



TRUSTEE 



Tuition 

Waivers for 

Community 

College 

Faculty 

Members 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman of the Faculty and Educational Policy 
Committee then described a proposed program for three new Classic 
courses : 

Latin 326 Latin Didactic Epic 

Latin 327 Latin History and Biography 

Latin 328 Latin Drama 

The program is designed to attract majors into the field and train 
them for teaching professions. Chairman Troy described the need in 
the public school system for teachers and stated the committee had 
recommended that the three courses be adopted. However, responding 
to a letter from Trustee Plimpton (who is also President of Amherst 
College and a member of the Five College Cooperative program) the 
recommendation will be held for a month to give the committee oppor 
tunity to investigate further, whether the need can be filled by use 
of the Five College program. 

There was discussion in which it was said that this is an 
excellent opportunity for practical application of the raison d'etre 
for the Five College Cooperative program, the theory of which is 
generally endorsed. Chairman Troy emphasized that if the program in 
this area is not workable, the students have a right to have the 
advantage of the Classic program, as described, established on the 
University campus. 

It was then agreed to strike temporarily the three Latin 
courses from the Document T68-066) List of Courses. 

Chairman Troy then introduced a proposed resolution for 
tuition waiver for community college faculty members. After con- 
sideration and on motion made and seconded, it was unanimoualy 
agreed: 

WHEREAS it has been traditionally the posture of the 
University of Massachusetts to uphold and 
support the regional community colleges in 
every way possible, and 

WHEREAS the number of students coming to the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts increases yearly, to 
the point where eventually a third to a half 
of the students in the upper two classes at the 
University will have received their initial 
college training at one of the regional commu- 
nity colleges, and 

WHEREAS it is definitely in the best interests of the 
University that faculty members at the re- 
gional community colleges have the advantages 
afforded by exposure to University instruction 
and research in order to better train students 
both on the transfer and terminal programs, and 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



WHEREAS similar tuition waiver privileges are avail- 
able to faculty members at the University 
who teach the same courses at the same levels 
to students who will end up in the same 
classes, it is therefore 

VOTED : That the President is authorized to waive 
tuition, but not fees, for faculty members 
of Massachusetts Regional Community Colleges 
taking courses at the University of Massa- 
chusetts providing that the faculty members 
are full time before taking such courses and 
return to full-time teaching in their commu- 
nity college after completion of course work. 

A recommendation for approval of a proposal for a summer 
study program in Japan for the summer of 1968 at Sophia University 
was described by Chairman Troy. He stated there would be no cost 
to the University. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the proposal for a Summer Study 
in Japan Program as outlined in Document 
T68-065. 

Chairman Troy described a listing of new courses, graduat^ 
and undergraduate (Document T68-066) , including Physical Education 
courses and Studies in Rhetoric and Prose Style, approval of which 
the committee recommended, with the deletion of the Latin courses 
previously discussed. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the Programs and New Courses 
of Study as shown on Document T68-066 
(with Latin deleted) attached to these 
minutes. 

The Provost advised that during the past year 11 programs 
were added, two were revised; a total of 71 new courses, four re- 
vised and three deleted. He drew attention to the fact that there 
were sixty academic departments and an average of one new course 
per department. 

Acting Chairman Healey next called for the report of the 
Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Chairman Haigis ad- 
vised that among the matters to be reported, that of the selection 
of a permanent site for the University at Boston was most important 
He stated that a progress report concerning the major studies in- 
cluding evaluation of the sites and a summary of the technical aspects 
of the problem had been prepared by the University's site con- 
sultants, Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates. He asked Mr. Sasaki of 
that organization to outline for the Board of Trustees the general 
criteria developed for application to any and all sites which have 
been under consideration. 



3049 



Proposal for 
Summer Study 
in Japan 
Program 



New Programs 
and Courses 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings & 
Grounds 



3050 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. K. E. Alexander for the consultants then explained 



the site study approach, 
studied: 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 



Four major categories of sites were 

core area 
core fringe 
intermediate area 
route 128 corridor 



He described the various factors involved, including size and its 
effect on the type of planning required. To illustrate more pre- 
cisely, he adopted the use of slides which detailed the site criteri|a 
as follows: 



SITE SIZE 



SITE FACTOR 



DEVELOPMENT 
POTENTIAL 



LOCATIONAL 
FACTORS 



DEVELOPMENT 
ECONOMICS 



AVAILABILITY 



Program 
Development Density 

Identifiable Center 
Possible Expansion 

Site configuration 
Architectural Expression 
Visibility 

Regional access 

Link to Local and Regional Access 

Environs 

Displacement of Taxable Property 
Displacement of Non-Taxable Property 
Acquisition Costs 
Demolition Site Development Cost 
Source of Premium Construction Costs 

Physical or Factual Data 
Policy Administrative Level 



After discussion of factors, including the considerations of future 
expansion and transportation, designed to aid the Trustees in 
arriving at a decision with as much technical help as possible, 
Mr. Alexander turned the meeting back to Chairman Haigis. 

Chairman Haigis stated that more than fifty meetings had 
been held on site considerations for UMass at Boston, sixteen in the 
current year. The committee now felt they had examined all possi- 
bilities and would not now accept further suggestions beyond those 
prof erred before the meeting by Mayor White, Speaker of the House 
of Representatives Quinn and the Administrator of BRA. 

The original intention of the committee had been to 
recommend three sites at this meeting; namely: 

Turnpike-Air Rights site 
Watertown Arsenal 
Columbia Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The recommendation of the Turnpike-Air Rights site was based, how- 
ever, on the hope for support by the Mayor and the BRA office. 
This support has not been forthcoming. In the opinion of the Mayor 
and BRA Administrator Champion, development of the Turnpike-Air 
Rights site by the University is not in the best interests of the 
City of Boston. This site, therefore, is not included in the 
recommendation. The committee is then left with the following 
recommendations : 

Watertown Arsenal 
Columbia Point 
and those suggested this morning: 

a. expand in Park Square, from 
present location (BRA suggestion) 

b. reconsider North Station (Mayor's 
suggestion) 

c. Fenway Park as core - and extend 
from there (Speaker's suggestion, 
conditioned on the Red Sox having 
a stadium located at another site) 

Chairman Haigis stated that no votes were recommended at 
this time. The sites were submitted for consideration only as part 
of the progress report. He stated that it is expected further eli- 
minations will be made. Additional progress will be reported at 
the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees on April 15. 

In response to a question, Chairman Haigis stated the 
committee is not recommending a site at this meeting so that suffi- 
cient study may be given to the additional sites suggested by the 
Mayor, the BRA Administrator and the Speaker. 

Chairman Healey acknowledged the progress report. He 
stated that in the ten years he has served as a member of the Board 
no committee he can recall has worked harder or assumed a more 
difficult task than the Buildings and Grounds Committee in its 
search for a site for the University at Boston. However, this is 
now approaching the hour of decision. He stated there would be a 
further report at the April meeting of the Board. 

The Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds Committee then 
advised that four bids were received on the Campus Boulevard 
project, of which Puffer Construction Company of North Amherst was 
the lowest bidder. The appropriation is available and the committe;, 
therefore, recommends the contract be awarded. 



Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 



3051 



Campus 
Boulevard 



3052 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 

Berkshire 

Gas 

Company 



VOTED : To award the contract for construction 

of the Campus Boulevard to the low bidder, 
Puffer Construction Company of North 
Amherst, for the sum of $923,473. 

Chairman Haigis advised that bottled gas had been used 
for campus needs. It is now recommended that natural gas lines be 
installed and maintained, at no cost to the University, to bring 
the supply to the foundations of certain buildings. 



Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the agreement with the Berkshire 
Gas Company for installation and maintenance 
of gas lines on the campus in accordance 
with the terms of a contract on file in the 
office of the Treasurer. 

Personnel President Lederle stated that the listing of Personnel 

Actions Actions had been circulated to the members of the Board (Document 
T68-068) . The Provost asked for a deletion on page 12A, item 2 
(Spaights) . After consideration, motion was made and seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 

as detailed in Document T68-068 with deletion 

as noted, which document is herewith attached 

to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure for the period 
February 20, 1968 to March 22, 1968 as de- 
tailed in Document T68-068A, which is here- 
with attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 



It was also 



VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees with respect to professional per- 
sonnel under provisions of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and 
descriptive job specification for each posi- 
tion to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, trans- 
ferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Lyons as the delegate to the Board of Higher Edu- 
cation reported there was relatively no current activity with 
reference to the University. Meetings of the BHE continue to be 
very instructive. 

President Lederle next commented on the acute need of the 
University for additional funds. He stated that, although he 
appreciated the fiscal situation of the state, the recent advance 
in taxes had netted nothing for higher education in the Common- 
wealth. The Governor's budget is inadequate to permit higher edu- 
cation to do the quality job which must be done. The President ex- 
pressed his intention to communicate this need to the Governor, and 
to urge that the Legislature approve a supplemental budget. The 
situation is so serious that the faculty on the Boston campus is 
discouraged; and, in fact, many students will not be able to finish 
science courses because laboratories and books will not be avail- 
able. 

Chancellor Ryan endorsed the President's comments and 
drew attention to a statement prepared by the Budget Committee of 
UM/Boston concerning the seriousness of the problem. Copies of 
this document (T68-069) were supplied to the members of the Board. 
He said the budget simply is not sufficient to provide the program 
for the next year, and he urged that steps be taken without delay 
to insure understanding of this problem on the part of the legisla- 
tive leadership. 

Trustee Gordon said irreparable harm would be done to the 
University if the condition is allowed to continue. It can mean 
loss of many faculty. It could take fifteen years to regain what 
will be lost. He stated the situation is more than crucial and the 
Boston campus simply cannot afford to have it continue. Stringent 
conditions also apply to Amherst, he stated, and was hopeful that 
an informative discussion with the Governor would bring about im- 
provement. The President stated that meetings had been held with 
the Governor's staff, though not with the Governor himself. 

Discussion was held in which Trustee Lyons advised that 
the condition of budgetary structure described above is evident 
throughout the entire state. Chancellor Millard of the Board of 
Higher Education plans to make a representation in the interest of 
all higher education in Massachusetts. He suggested Chancellor 
Ryan prepare a memorandum outlining the need for student course 
transfers due to the lack of laboratory equipment and supplies. 

The Chairman recognized Trustee Brown who then addressed 
the Board. Mr. Brown expressed his deep appreciation for the 
Resolution passed earlier in the meeting; also, for the honors pre- 
viously received through the years. He stated it had been a wonder 
ful experience and a great joy to be a member of the Board of 
Trustees, and expressed his own and Mrs. Brown's pleasure in the 
very pleasant association over the years. 



3053 



UM/ Bos ton 



3054 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Vice Chairman Healey thanked Trustee Brown and said "the 
members of the Board would have a very special place in their hearts 
for Harry who has been a loyal supporter of the institution." 



TRUSTEE 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 





'J. McCartney 
y, Board of Tri/ 



ees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
April 15, 1968, 1:30 p.m., Whitmore Administration Bid., Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Frechette 
Gordon, Haigis , Healey, Knowles, Lyons, 
Maginnis, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Dean Moore, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Miss Coulter. Professors 
Bromery, Darity, Johnson, Wilson; 
Professor Ludtke for Faculty Senate; 
Professor Silver for Communications 
Board; Student Senate President Collins, 
Vice President Boronski; Peter Ward for 
YAHOO; also, David Stevens, John Poirier, 
Miss Tracy of Student Affairs and Members 
of the Press. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 pf the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 
2:00 p.m. 

Chairman Boyden welcomed the student groups, the press 
and faculty members to the meeting. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees held on March 22, 
1968. 

President Lederle then commented on a program carried on 
by negro members of the faculty, entirely on their own time, in 
response to a concern that the University did not include in its 
enrollment an appropriate proportion of the disadvantaged. He then 
asked Professor Johnson to describe the efforts to stimulate and 
encourage enrollment from this segment of the Commonwealth. Pro- 
fessor Johnson introduced the members of the committee present to 
the Board. 

A survey a year ago revealed a total of only 85 negro 
students at the University (including 20 graduate students) . He 
attributed the exclusion of negroes from most institutions of 
higher learning to the fact they do not meet the conventional 



3055 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



3056 



Program 
for Dis- 
advantaged 
Students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

standards of admission in which entrance is based on SATS, high 
school GPA and similar criteria. Professor Johnson stated that most 
negroes from a ghetto school and environment cannot meet these ad- 
mission standards. The members of the committee, using personal 
funds, traveled throughout the state, and as a result of interviews 
and recommendations, have compiled a listing of 250 prospective 
candidates for admission. 

It is the opinion of the committee that many of these, if 
given opportunity, could do as well as others within similar 
criteria. A program to supply necessary reinforcement where certain 
weaknesses in the background become evident has been formed. A 
major problem also is the financial one. A survey indicates the 
average family income in this group to be $5,000 compared to the 
family income of the typical student of $10,000. The professor then 
outlined steps taken to secure financial aid for the program in- 
cluding an appeal to the Ford Foundation. This resulted in an agree 
ment to help, but contingent upon similar action by the Common- 
wealth. He then outlined plans and a program for 125 students in 
1968 and additional numbers in 1969. He expressed the hope that 
the need for the independently inspired program would soon be 
obviated by the assumption of full responsibility for this program 
by the Commonwealth. 

Professor Johnson was commended for his presentation and 
was assured that the Board, in general, supported his position. 
He was advised the appropriate committee would consider the entire 
program and submit a formal resolution to the Board of Trustees at 
the next meeting. Trustee Lyons expressed the hope that the motion 
would include a vigorous prodding of the state for funds in support 
of this endeavor. 

In response to question, Professor Johnson stated there 
are a number of programs similar to that proposed, two of which are 
outstanding. He cited particularly the New York City program and 
that of the University of California at Berkeley, California which 
has enrolled several hundred disadvantaged. The professor noted 
that a remarkable number of students (907=) survived the freshman 
year in the 1966 New York City program. 

On motion then made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the proposed program for students 
from disadvantaged areas in principle and re- 
fer it to the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy with the recommendation that an 
appropriate resolution be forwarded from that 
committee to the May 3, 1968 meeting of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Lyons then submitted the report of the Committee 
on Student Activities. He informed the Board of the deliberations 
of the committee concerning the Visiting Policy in the residence 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



halls. He stated the faculty and student committees have been 
working on this for nearly two years and after full discussion the 
recommendations of the faculty and student groups had merged. With 
the approval of the Administration, it was agreed to put this pro- 
gram on the honor system basis, thus leaving it to the student 
committee at each residence to assume responsibility as to whether 
the doors will be open or closed. He noted that (1) the students 
must have written parental permission and (2) a system of signing 
in and out of guests must be followed. 

Chairman Lyons noted that provision had also been made to 
accommodate students not wishing to be included in this program. 
Opportunity will be allowed, at room choosing time, for students to 
be assigned to an appropriate area - compatible with their indi- 
vidual wishes. He said the Student Activities Committee voted to 
recommend this revised policy to the Board. 

Dean Field read a listing of colleges pursuing a similar 
policy. Student Senate President Collins addressed the Board in 
support of the policy. He stressed that each residence hall must 
vote on each visiting hours scheduled. In the event responsibility 
is not properly exercised, the Student Government will act and the 
visiting hours privileges will be withdrawn. Mr. Collins said it 
would not be a disciplinary matter but would be handled in con- 
junction with the Dean of Students. 

Chairman Lyons suggested it is not realistic to expect 
the Board to chart the lives and personal relations of the students 
in contemporary society. Under these circumstances, he said, it is 
fortunate there is a system of placing responsibility upon the stu- 
dents themselves and upon appropriate faculty groups. 

There was discussion. In answer to question, Dean Field 
stated (1) the program is a comprehensive one. Regulation extends 
to the fraternity and sorority houses; also (2) any house that has 
vandalism does not have good government and does not deserve the 
privilege of visiting hours. 

A motion was made to accept the committee recommendation 
that the Residence Hall Visiting Policy be adopted. This was later 
withdrawn in order to allow sufficient opportunity for further 
study by the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Lyons then informed the Board of discussions 
held with reference to re-establishment of a humor magazine on 
campus. He briefly described the proposed organization and the 
provisions incorporated which are designed to insure representative 
elections to the editorial board. He noted that the Communications 
Board which would be advisors to the magazine would be appointed 
by the President, and that the proposal has the approval of the 
Student Senate. 



3057 



Report of 
Committee 
on Student 
Activities 



Residence 
Hall Visit- 
ing Policy 



YAHOO 



3058 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was general discussion. The traumatic history of 
YAHOO, the campus humor magazine, was reviewed. Vice Chairman 
Healey asserted strong support for the quality DAILY COLLEGIAN, but 
reviewed the serious past trouble caused by YAHOO, leading to ex- 
tensive damage to total University relations with the general public 
and the Legislature. He pointed out the full ramifications of the 
damage, including increased difficulty in securing appropriations 
from the Legislature for buildings and student purposes. 

Mr. Healey emphasized the total dedication of the Trustees 
to the University and to the best interests of the students and 
asserted it would take a great deal of persuasion of the Trustees 
plus full assurance of adequate controls to induce favorable Trustee 
consideration in this matter. 

President Lederle asked Mr. Peter Ward, chairman of the 
committee to revive the publication, to speak to the reasons for re- 
taining the name YAHOO in view of the proposed totally new organiza- 
tion. Mr. Ward supported retention of the name on the grounds that 
the performance of prior staffs, not the name, had constituted the 
problem. The Student Senate has voted retention of the name. 
Mr. Ward stated it was up to the new staff to do a better job and 
improve the quality of the publication. 

Senate President Collins affirmed student awareness of 
the problem created by the former publication of the magazine. He 
stated it would not be solved by forcing it off campus. Strategi- 
cally, President Collins said, it is better to have a humor magazine 
on campus, subject to controls. He stated that the original 
problems with YAHOO should have been brought to the Student Senate 
for disciplinary action. President Lederle advised that this had 
been done; but the procedures became involved in the Free Press 
Movement, and the Administration's complaints were entirely in- 
effective. The President likewise emphasized the irreparable damage 
done to the University by this incident. 

Discussion encompassed consideration of funds. Mr. Ward 
stated until the publication becomes a legal entity and is 
authorized to become a member of the RSO group, funds cannot be re- 
quested. It was estimated that the publication would cost $1,500 
per issue, based on previous experience. Trustee Plimpton, in 
answer to request, stated that, at Amherst, the College is not 
responsible for the humor magazine, nor does it have control over th 
student budget. Neither is the College subject to suit. The stu- 
dents have full responsibility. Trustee Plimpton expressed his 
support for a campus humor magazine, but left in debate the question 
of whether the title should be retained. 

After further discussion, Vice Chairman Healey suggested 
the matter be remanded for further consideration. Motion was there- 
upon made, seconded, and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To remand the consideration of the Resi- 
dence Hall Visiting Hours Policy, and the 
consideration of approval of the Constitu- 
tion of YAHOO, to the next meeting of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Lyons expressed regret that the Trustees in 
general have not become more involved in actual campus contact with 
the students and faculty working with the students and thus had 
opportunity to be directly aware of campus attitudes. He encouraged 
the adoption of a plan of a yearly meeting with student leaders 
merely for general discussion and updating. 

President Lederle suggested a concentrated two-day sessio^i 
of discussions related to campus matters such as the one held at 
Northfield a few years ago. Trustee Gordon concurred. 

Chairman Boyden then called for the report of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Trustee Healey, Acting Chairman of the Executive Committee 
advised that the committee met on April 10 and considered a pro- 
posed increase in room rents and board rates at the University; 
also, establishing uniformity in room rates throughout the campus. 
Some reaction from those directly affected has been felt and the 
recommendation is made that the matter be postponed until the next 
meeting of the Board, to afford sufficient opportunity for the 
Treasurer to make a further presentation as to the purpose and need 
for the increase, as well as the philosophy behind the uniformity 
provision. 

Treasurer Johnson said the basic issue is that the Uni- 
versity is attempting to provide fine new facilities in residence 
and dining halls in a highly inflationary building construction 
period. He described the spiraling costs for labor and materials 
in the construction industry and as well as state services. He 
pointed out that as long as the University is expected to self-li- 
quidate the facilities, there is no other way to secure funds for 
amortization except through a realistic schedule of room and board 
charges . 

Treasurer Johnson referred to Document T68-070 which out- 
lined the situation relative to the room and board rate increase. 
In addition he described the proposal to equalize room rents across 
the campus in accord with previous practice. The Treasurer ad- 
vised that, based on present estimates of construction cost, the 
residence halls planned for the fall of 1970 will advance to more 
than $550 per room. He stated the only way it is possible to hold 
costs down is to equalize costs across the campus. 

The Treasurer then discussed the necessary increase also 
in the board rate. He described factors contributing to the in- 
crease including labor costs, a policy permitting second helpings, 



3059 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



Room Rents 



Board Rates 



3060 



TRUSTEE 



Marine 
Science 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and a limited five-day meal ticket, compared to the mandatory seven- 
day ticket held by other institutions. 

There was discussion of a "hand-out" publication 
describing some living conditions as unworthy of increase as "ghetto 
conditions. Dean Field described the buildings referred to as re- 
quiring refurbishing. President Lederle stated no one is living 
under ghetto conditions at the University. 

The President of the Student Senate stated that student 
dissatisfaction stemmed from lack of communication. He expressed 
the value and need for dissemination of information to the student 
body. In the present case, the increase was submitted to the stu- 
dents without sufficient advance notice. The Treasurer said that a 
meeting with students has been held. Others are scheduled. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To remand action on the proposed increase 
in room and board rates; also equalization 
of room rates throughout campus, to the 
next meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Healey apprised the Board of an opportunity to 
lease facilities from the Coast Guard at Gloucester and Plum Island 
for use in the Marine Sciences program. He stated there will be no 
cost until such time as the University wishes to acquire the 
property, upon removal of the Coast Guard and the property becomes 
surplus, at which time the University will have first priority. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 

to sign for and in the name of the Trustees 
a Revocable License for the use of a parcel 
of land owned by the United States of 
America and under the jurisdiction, custody 
and control of the United States Coast Guard 
located at Plum Island, Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts for a period from March 1, 1968 to 
March 1, 1969 with provisions for renewal 
for four additional years in accordance with 
the terms of the Revocable License as pre- 
sented to this meeting and on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer. 

It was also 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 

to sign for and in the name of the Trustees 
a Revocable License for the joint use with 
the United States Coast Guard of the station, 
buildings and dock at Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts, for a period from March 1, 1968 to 
March 1, 1969 with provisions for renewal 
for four additional years in accordance with 
the terms of the Revocable License as pre- 
sented to this meeting and on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer. 

The Chairman then described an agreement which would per- 
mit appropriate equipment to be erected on Mount Tom, for the opera 
tion of the planned ETV channel of the University (see Document 
T68-076) . He stated no cost to the University would be entailed at 
present. 

Motion was made and seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : To approve an agreement to lease certain 

space and facilities on Mt. Tom, presently 
owned by the WHYN Stations Corporation as 
detailed in Document T68-076. 

Chairman Healey described the need for a continuing 
policy of insuring that the legislative and executive leaders of 
the Commonwealth comprehend fully the rationale of budget transfers 
effected by the University. He referred to Document T68-077 list- 
ing transfers made during the last year. He stated this is 
standard procedure at this time of year and reviewed the basis for 
the transfers as documented in the memorandum attached. 

Upon motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize and approve transfers for the 
year 1968 as shown on Document T68-077. 

Trustee Haigis, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds, reported on a series of meetings held with reference 
to the UM/Boston site selection. He said a letter had been dis- 
patched to Mayor White with regard to the North Station recommenda- 
tion, and response is expected from the BRA. In addition, the 
business community has been contacted with regard to other recommend 
ed locations. It is expected that further reports will be avail- 
able by the first week in May, including one on Fenway Park. It 
is hoped to narrow the final possibilities further. The Chairman 
pointed out this is a very deepseated problem with many ramifica- 
tions. It deserves the most intensive considerations that can be 
accorded. The University at Boston is not being built for a month 
or a year, but for the decades and centuries to come. 



3061 



TV 
Agreement 



UM/Boston 
Site 



3062 



1970 
Dormitories 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis then reviewed the 1970 Residence Hall 
Complex. He stated the original plan for three high-rise buildings 
in the northeast quad had been reconsidered. He asked Messrs. Kohn 
and Post of the architectural firm of John Carl Warnecke Associates 
to describe the new plan. 

Mr. Kohn, by means of slides and table models, augmented 
by an area map, presented the new concept which provides accommoda- 
tions for 1400 students in the wooded area east of the women's 
tennis courts. The north quadrangle project would be reduced to 
800 students, thus allowing for elimination of the towers. 

Trustee Pumphret, as a member of the Building Authority, 
endorsed the new concept, and stated that a magnificent job had been 
done. 

MiSs Frances Boronski, Vice President of the Student Senat 
expressed appreciation for the consideration extended the students 
in their request for revision of the original plan. 

Trustee Knowles expressed pleasure at the design and its 
relation to the landscape. 

Trustee Haigis stated the campus master planning Board of 
the University has approved the plan and it has also been submitted 
to the Building Authority. 

On motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the concept as shown by the 

architectural firm of John Carl Warnecke 
Associates to locate residence halls for 
1400 students at the location east of the 
women's tennis courts (as shown on a 
diagram) for the fall of 1970; and resi- 
dence halls for approximately 800 students 
in the northeast quadrangle to be ready 
for the fall of 1971. 

President Lederle then presented the Personnel Actions. 
After due comment and on motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

TOTED: To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T68-071, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
March 23, 1968 to April 14, 1968 as detailed 
in Document T68-071A, which is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 



3063 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action -shall be- sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now 
in effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
with respect to professional personnel under 
provisions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or determined 
shall be as hereafter determined by the Board 
of Trustees or under their authority. 

It was 



VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 

Titles effective on and after April 1, 1968, 
as detailed in Document T68-072, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



It was also 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any job 
group number or grade. 

There was comment that the personnel actions revealed 
considerable activity in the School of Education and the hope was 
expressed that the Board would have opportunity to meet with the 
new Dean of Education at a future meeting. Provost Tippo agreed 
to arrange this. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:04 p.m. 




Secret 



3064 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 3, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



President 's 

Comments 



Bargaining 
Unit 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Crowley, Emerson, 
Frechette, Gordon, Greenblatt, Haigis, 
Knowles, Lambs on, Lyons, Maginnis, 
McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Acting Dean Gagnon, UM/B Plan- 
ning Officer O'Brien; Dr. Thompson, 
Dr. Shapiro, Miss Coulter; Members of 
the Student Senate - Paul Silverman, 
Frederic Hartwell, Alan Gauthier; Members 
of the Student Affairs Committee - Susan 
Tracy and Frances Boronski; Member of 
the Collegian - Mark Silverman; Members 
of the Student Senate Ad Hoc Committee 
on Room and Board Rates; Area Coordina- 
tors - James Burke, Paul Brubacher, 
Walter Silva; Dean Field and Professor 
Isidore Silver; Treasurer's Assistant 
Robert Kittle; Members of YAHOO - David 
Stevens and John Poirier. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 19S8 
having been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of 
Trustees being present and acting throughout, in the absence 
of the Chairman the meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. 
by Acting Chairman Healey. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been 
circulated and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting 

of the Board of Trustees held on April 15, 
1968. 

The president then commented that the decision 
rendered by the Commonwealth Labor Relations Commission on 
the issue of designating a University bargaining unit had 
been circulated to the members of the Board. This decision 
held in favor of seven units, as contrasted with a single 
overall unit of non-professional employees. The Commission 
has set the date of May 27 for an election to determine 
whether the Association, the Union, or neither has the support 
of a majority of employees in each of the units. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle noted that, throughout the country, 
similar cases have gone either way. He then invited Trustee 
comment . 

Trustee Pumphret inquired how many employees, in the 
groups, excluded from these decisions, represented the supervisory 
category. Business Manager Grady was invited to respond. He 
stated there are approximately 42 or 43 persons in this group and 
added that a meeting is scheduled of all groups to discuss the 
addition or deletion of personnel in these groups. Mr. Grady 
said this had been arranged with the Commission. Neither the 
Union nor the Association plan an appeal. 

Chairman Healey said the Trustees had stated their posi- 
tion as to what they thought was the appropriate bargaining unit 
and see no reason to impose their views further. It is possible 
to work under these arrangements as well as any other. 

The President then advised the Board with regret that 
Chancellor Ryan had accepted a position at another University. 
He said the Chancellor has agreed to stay until September 1 in 
order to provide assistance in developing the budget request for 
UM/Boston for the following year. In the meantime a Consultative 
Committee on the Chancellorship, composed of members of the UM at 
Boston faculty, has been appointed to work with the President in 
screening candidates. President Lederle said, when preliminary 
screening has been completed and a list of key people compiled, 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy will have an 
opportunity to interview prospective candidates. The members of 
the Consultative Committee are: Professors Antonoff, Bluestone, 
Brown, Campbell, Goodwin, Lipke and James Ryan of the Boston 
faculty, and Dean Redfern. 

The President also solicited suggestions from the Board 
of Trustees and from any member of the faculty. A national search 
has been instituted to secure a successor to head up the work of 
the Boston campus. 

Chancellor Ryan was then invited to speak. He expressed 
appreciation for the personal as well as official help, encourage- 
ment and assistance given him by members of the Boston faculty and 
by members of the Board over the past three years. H e noted that 
his association with the Board extended over seven years. He 
stated that the members of the Board, the faculty and the student 
body have reason for some satisfaction when they look back on the 
accomplishments of the past three years. He expressed confidence 
that his successor would receive the same kind of support and 
encouragement resulting in bright prospects for the success of the 
Boston campus in the years ahead. 



3065 



Chancellor- 
ship - UM/B 



3066 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey acknowledged Chancellor Ryan's comments 
and stated that the Board at the appropriate time would take suit- 
able action to recognize the service he had given to the University 

There was no report of the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy. 

Chairman Haigis then gave the report of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. He said that, in accord with the instruc- 
tions from the Board, the search for the site for the UM/Boston 
permanent campus in the core city has continued. He reported 
progress, stating there is some support from the business commu- 
nity to explore the possibility of expansion from the present 
location at 100 Arlington Street. Such exploration is being 
carried on, and it is hoped that with continued support this loca- 
tion will prove to be a prime location for UM at Boston. 

Chairman Healey advised he had been involved to some 
extent on the perimeter of the negotiations and assured the Board 
that a number of meetings had been held with individuals and with 
the BRA. A sincere effort is being made to determine what may 
fall within accepted urban renewal plans, with a view to persuad- 
ing some of the officials to change these plans if this proves to 
be desirable. Within a week or ten days the sub-committee will 
again confer with the BRA officals to attempt to resolve the 
central core site problem. 

President Lederle presented personnel actions which had 
been supplied in advance of the meeting to the members of the 
Board. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

V OTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T68-078, and supple- 
ments #1 and #2, which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period April 16, 1968 to May 2, 1968 as 
detailed in Document T68-078A, which is 
herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED: That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
with respect to professional personnel under 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



provisions of Chapter 75 of the General 
Laws as amened by Chapter 648, 1962. The 
classification, salary range and descrip- 
tive job specification for each position 
to which a member of the professional staff 
is hereby appointed, promoted, transferred 
or determined shall be as hereafter deter- 
mined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

Trustee Gordon was recognized by Chairman Healey. 
Mr. Gordon expressed concern that the budget requests for the 
operation of the University, both in Amherst and Boston, had been 
substantially reduced. The Governor's message had recommended 
cuts which were, for example, approximately 387» in Boston. He 
said that in the United States, during the last two decades, no 
other existing campus of a state university has had the budget 
recommendations by its Board of Trustees reduced to the degree 
now suggested by the Governor. At Mr. Gordon's request the entire 
transcript of this discussion follows herewith: 

While under the aegis of the Presidential agenda, I 
would like to discuss for a moment the situation on the budget of 
the University as it exists at the present time. At the March 
meeting, there was some discussion raised, part of which I raised 
and others raised, on some of the crucial areas of our University 
budget for this year, both in Amherst and in Boston. Amherst, 
where our request for some $42 million was reduced in House 1 to 
$34 million and in Boston with request for some $7 million $900M 
reduced to $4 million 900M. The preparation of the document that 
was testified for Ways and Means Committee in part reads, as it 
relates to the University in Boston, that the budget for the 
University of Massachusetts/Boston which the Trustees recommended 
to the Governor totaled $7 million 916M. The Governor has recom- 
mended cuts in this budget which total $3 million. (If) the 
Commonwealth were on the stage of bankruptcy; funds simply did 
not exist to establish a public university in Boston and it had 
become necessary to reverse a decision to do so, the Governor's 
recommendations could be understood in that context. Neither 
this, nor any other reason, has been announced. Yet, in the 
United States during the last two decades, no other existing cam- 
pus of a state university has had the budget recommendations by 
its Board of Trustees reduced to the degree or in the manner which 
is now suggested by the Governor for the University of Massachu- 
setts/Boston. 

I am also speaking for the University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst, where there was a rather large cut. Observations were 
made two months ago that faculty were being disgruntled as to the 
future and potential, particularly in Boston, due to the lack of 
support such examples for example as a request for half a million 
dollars for the library, which is desperately needed and the 



3067 



3068 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

House 1 budget of the Governor of $100M. Since that time the 
Legislature has done something rather unusal in that it has raised 
rather considerably, more than what Legislatures usually do - the 
budget. But we have this problem and I think it should be discussec 
to the point of looking for some help, for some support, for some 
leadership. While I am not relating the Chancellor's resignation 
specifically to the budget, comments were made months ago that we 
have a distinguished faculty, both in Amherst and at Boston, and 
the support that we are getting now is not sufficient to justify 
the programs that we had and that we want to continue. 

The hope that the Governor would join us as a Trustee by 
attending some of our meetings, by getting aware of our specific 
problems, particularly in the budget, and give us the kind of 
political leadership we should be getting so that these things, 
particularly faculty disaffection, lack of support, will not con- 
tinue. As far as the University of Massachusetts/Boston is con- 
cerned, and its site search, the kind of political leadership that 
we should be enjoying has not been forthcoming and I would hope 
that my statement would be an invitation to engender that support, 
which we desperately, desperately need. This is not in any way a 
partisan statement. 

I have been involved for over 25 years as a student, 
alumnus, President of the Alumni of University of Massachusetts 
which is above and beyond all partisan considerations, but we have 
reached a point where even with deficiency budgets, supplemental 
budgets in the last few years, we are not getting the kind of sup- 
port that we need to further the programs that we now and want to 
engender. It is our hope, mine particularly, that we can begin to 
get this kind of support. I would hope that the discussions with 
the Governor and executive branch of the government would be con- 
tinued. I want to make it crystal clear that while we have had 
problems with the Legislature before and will undoubtedly have them, 
this immediate budget problem is not their concern totally in that 
Legislatures rarely add large amounts to Governor's budgets. In 
this instance here, this year, they have added considerable amounts 
to a Governor's budget. The problem is in the executive leader- 
ship of the Commonwealth, as it relates to this University and I 
would hope that this statement would be construed as an invitation 
to engender more executive support of our problems, particularly 
financial, hopefully in the way of Boston site problems so that we 
can begin to do what is best not only for the University but for 
the Commonwealth as a whole. That's all I have to say. 

Chairman Healey - any other comments? 

Mr. Pumphret - Ken, what is the normal cut (it has been) usual for 
the Governor to reduce your recommendation. Isn't it when you 
send in your recommendation for 

Mr. Johnson - That is true . The budget is set up with various 
programs. First, the basic program of continuing the existing on- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

-going program; the additional students at both Amherst and Boston 
is the next program. In addition to that, certain other programs 
that are new. Now some of these were the ones that were reduced 
as well as some of the basic programs. 

Mr. Pumphret - In (the) Boston, this cut is about 387„, and in 
Amherst it is about 207°; that's why I was curious whether - is 
there some norm that is customary where they lop off because it 
would seem to me that a reduction of 38% in a Boston budget and 
somebody put an axe to it as compared to the normal treatment - 
and I was wondering what has been your experience in the past with 
these budgetary problems as to what they have done to you. 

Mr. Johnson - I think the percentage cut on a percentage basis is 
higher this year than normal at the executive level. Now I would 
just like to add one thing that I think is a note of hope. That 
is going to be very beneficial to both the Boston campus and the 
Amherst campus if it materializes and that is that in the Capital 
Outlay Program that was presented to the executive branch by the 
Board of Higher Education there is included $500M for library 
books for Boston and $1 million for library books for Amherst. 
Now these were two items that were cut out of the operating budget 
and hopefully they will be included in the Governor's capital 
recommendation. This will be a giant step forward in both Amherst 
and Boston in areas that are vital to us in terms of improving 
libraries, if they are recommended to the Legislature. 

Mr. Gordon resumes - Mr. Treasurer, we appreciate that and we hope 
that goes through. However, in Amherst, when a request of $28 
million for salaries is reduced to $20 million, and the request in 
Boston for $4 million odd is reduced to $2 million, obviously this 
is not a capital outlay restoration. In the way of back-up ser- 
vices which the University in Boston particularly needs, where 
department heads are doing their own typewriting, $706M for ser- 
vices down to $425M -- these are the problems. Again, the Legisla- 
ture this year has recognized the problems better than I think we 
could expect the Legislature to in raising this in Boston by, as 
I understand it, close to a million dollars, if not more, on this 
total budget request. We are still shy, but these are some of the 
problems. Your comments on the capital outlay and library books is 
true and this could be handled there, but the deficiencies are 
still vast and it is a question of keeping this distinguished 
faculty together and giving them hope that this state means busi- 
ness in putting together a first-rate public university in Boston. 
I hope that the Governor will lead the way to show this Common- 
wealth means what it has said. 

Mr. Lambson asked to be recognized. 

Mr. Lambson - Mr. Chairman, I believe no really useful purpose is 
served in publicly chastising the Governor and the administrative 
machinery of the state or in some of our cuts because (in) this we 
have to cooperate. They have to cooperate with us and we with them 
and I repeat, no really useful purpose is served in this manner. 



3069 



3070 



TRUSTEE 



Room and 
Board Rates 

Increase 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gordon - Mr. Lambson, this is an invitation and, I hope, not 
a chastisement. 

Mr. Lambson - Well, I so interpreted it. 

Mr. Lyons - Mr. Chairman, without wishing to be involved in 
chastisement, I would like to ask the Chancellor about the acute 
problem at the Boston campus. 

During the ensuing discussion, Chancellor Ryan reported 
that the House of Representatives had increased the budget for 
fiscal 1969 for the Boston campus in the amount of approximately 
$400,000. Badly needed items, principally provisions for support 
staff which have been requested for three years and never before 
provided, may now be forthcoming. The Chancellor stated that 
additional appropriation is urgently needed for equipment, with 
special emphasis on scientific and laboratory items. He asked 
the Board to reinforce its original request for nearly 8 million 
dollars, the sum required to operate the 1969 UM at Boston pro- 
gram at the level indicated by the Board. 



business , 



The meeting then moved to discussion of unfinished 



Treasurer Johnson reviewed the proposal for increased 
room and board rates at; the Amherst campus. This matter had been 
tabled at the previous meeting to provide time for more thorough 
discussion with student groups, including the student government. 
The Treasurer stated that a dozen very productive meetings had 
been held with the members of the Student Senate and an appointed 
sub-committee of the services committee. The students participat- 
ing in the meetings made major contributions towards an acceptable 
solution. As a result, the Student Senate voted to support an 
increase in the board rates as indicated on Document T68-070, 
supplied to the members of the Board. 

The students wish to continue for one year the differen- 
tial for rates between old residence halls and newer residence 
halls, at an increase of $50 per semester for each. This results 
in a rate of $400 for the traditional residence halls and $450 
per year in the newer Building Authority units. A proviso is 
included stating that when older dormitories are rehabilitated to 
bring them up to standards comparable with the newer buildings, 
the higher rate will apply. For example, Lewis House has received 
major refurbishing and in the fall the higher rate will apply. 
The rates were approved on a one-year basis so that students could 
be consulted annually through the Student Senate sub-committee 
regarding needs and priorities in refurnishing and refurbishing 
the residence halls. 

The Treasurer stated that two votes on each proposal 
(room and board) had been circulated to the Trustees to permit 
study in advance of the meeting. He expressed appreciation to the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students and others of the staff who had worked on this problem. 

The Chairman called for questions and comments and 
Trustee Pumphret requested that opportunity be allowed for the 
Building Authority to secure an opinion from Counsel Broadhurst, 
with particular reference to the comingling of funds, as related 
to provisions within the Management and Services Agreement. He 
stated a meeting is scheduled for May 9. Thus, there should be 
no undue delay in execution of the proposal. 

Student Senate President Paul Silverman was recognized. 
He stated that the Student Senate on May 2, 1968 had voted to peti- 
tion the Building Authority to permit comingling of funds. 

Trustee Greenblatt stated he was impressed that the stu- 
dents had voted for the increase even though it meant increased 
personal expense. Chairman Healey observed that, viewing the broad 
spectrum of American Universities, it becomes apparent that there 
will be increasing dialogue between the students, faculty, the 
administration and trustees. There is a hopeful sign here at the 
University of Massachusetts that this dialogue is proceeding in a 
useful and meaningful way. The Chairman expressed deep regret at 
the necessity for the increases in room and board rates and pointed 
to the rising costs of running the University, just as business 
and industry costs are rising nationally. He stated that financial 
resources would be made available to those students who cannot 
assume the added costs. He expressed Trustee appreciation for the 
realism and cooperative spirit with which the student leadership 
had approached the problem. 



After further comment, motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED : That, until the subject to further action 
of the Trustees amending the same, the 
following be and hereby is adopted as the 
schedule of charges for meals to be served 
commencing with the first day of the semes- 
ter to commence in September 1968 in student 
dining facilities, other than any owned or 
leased by University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, operated by the Trustees and 
that the following be and hereby are fixed as 
the fees, rents, rates and other charges for 
any other use of any such facility on and 
after such date: 

Schedule of Charges : 

For 15 meals per week - $245 par semester (1) 

For 21 meals per week - $340 per semester (1) 



3071 



3072 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(1) in each case excluding meals during extended vacation 
periods . 

Per day - $2.90 (effective for summer school, vacation periods, 
etc.) 



Per meal - Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 
Sunday dinner 



$ .95 
1.25 
1.50 
2.00 



The foregoing rates supersede those established by vote of the 
Trustees April 21, 1966. 

Group meals, conference rates, individual food and drink items - 
such amount as the Treasurer of the University shall fix to cover 
the cost of materials and special services plus reasonable provi- 
sion for other costs and expenses. 

Fees, rents, rates and other charges for other uses of student 
dining facilities : 

For rental or other use of all or any part of a facility - such 
amount as the Treasurer of the University shall fix to cover the 
cost of any special services plus reasonable provision for other 
costs and expenses. 

Refund Schedule 

A student who withdraws from the University after paying a semester 
meal charge shall be entitled to a pro-rata refund on such charge, 
less administrative costs in such amount as the Treasurer of the 
University may fix, provided, that no such refund shall be charged 
against any meal charge proceeds which are payable to University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority under any Management and Services 
Agreement relating to any dining facility owned or leased by the 
Authority. 

The Treasurer shall report to the Trustees all charges, fees, rents 
and rates established by him under authority of this resolution. 
No such charge, fee, rent or rate so established shall be reduced, 
but may be increased, without prior approval of the Committee of 
the Trustees on Buildings and Grounds. 

It was also 



VOTED : That the schedule of charges set forth in the 
foregoing vote be and hereby is recommended to 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
for adoption as the schedule of charges and 
other fees for meals served in and other uses 
of dining facilities owned or leased by it and 
that the Secretary of the Trustees be and he 
hereby is directed to certify these votes to 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the Authority as the writing provided for 
in Management and Services Agreements now 
in effect between the Commonwealth and the 
Authority pertaining to such dining facili- 
ties . 

It was further 



3073 



VOTED : That the following be and hereby is esta- 
blished as the schedule of charges to be 
in effect for periods commencing on or 
after the beginning of the academic year 
in September 1968 for occupancy of dormi- 
tory accommodations, other than those in 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority dormitories, at the University, 
namely: 



Per iod of T ime 



Semester 


15 


weeks 


14 


weeks 


13 


weeks 


12 


weeks 


11 


weeks 


10 


weeks 


9 


weeks 


8 


weeks 


7 


weeks 


6 


weeks 


5 


weeks 


4 


weeks 


3 


weeks 


2 


weeks 


1 


week 



Per day 



Charge 

$200.00 

188.00 

175.00 

163.00 

150.00 

138.00 

125.00 

113.00 

100.00 

88.00 

75.00 

63.00 

50.00 

38.00 

25.00 

13.00 

2.00 



provided, however, that if and whenever more 
than the design number of students shall be 
assigned to occupancy of dormitory accommoda- 
tions, other than those in University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority dormitories, 
for periods of more than four weeks each, the 
charge per student for such occupancy during 
such period shall be 807 o of the applicable 
charge stated above, and provided that upon 
the rehabilitation of any dormitory other than 
a Building Authority dormitory the charges for 
accommodations in such dormitory shall be in- 
creased, effective at commencement of the semes- 
ter beginning next after such completion, to the 



3074 



TRUSTEE 



Residence 
Hall 

Visiting 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

schedule recommended at this meeting for 
charges for accommodations in Building 
Authority dormitories. 



It was also 



VOTED: 



That the following be and hereby is recom- 
mended to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority as the schedule of char- 
ges to be in effect for periods commencing 
on or after the beginning of the academic 
year in September 1968 for student occupancy 
of dormitory accommodations in University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority dormitories, 
namely: 



Period of Time 
Semester 
15 weeks 
14 "weeks 
13 weeks 
12 weeks 
11 weeks 
10 weeks 

9 weeks 

8 weeks 

7 weeks 

6 weeks 

5 weeks 

4 weeks 

3 weeks 

2 weeks 

1 week 

Per day 



Charge 

$225.00 

211.00 

197.00 

183.00 

169.00 

155.00 

141.00 

127.00 

113.00 

98.00 

84.00 

70.00 

56.00 

42.00 

28.00 

14.00 

2.00 



Residence Hall Faculty Apartments $30.00 per 
month, provided, however, that if and when- 
ever more than the design number of students 
shall be assigned to occupancy of dormitory 
accommodations, for periods of more than four 
weeks each, the charge per student for such 
occupancy during such period shall be 807 o of the 
applicable charge stated above. 

The Chairman then recognized Trustee Lyons, Chairman of 
the Student Activities Committee, who brought to the Board his 
committee's recommendations under unfinished business with reference 
to the Residence Halls Visiting Hours (Document T68-074) , which 
item had been tabled at the meeting of April 15. This matter has 
been under discussion in committee and with student and faculty 
groups for two years. Chairman Lyons read a listing of practices 
at other educational institutions. Obviously, this is a situation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in a good deal of flux and under negotiation on many other cam- 
puses . 

Provost Tippo drew attention to a change in the April 3 
document, recommended by the Dean of Students - page 2, item D; 
deletion of second sentence. This, in effect, means no visita- 
tion until all houses establish a proper form of government and 
show responsibility with respect to noise, damage, etc. Dr. 
Tippo strongly recommended the policy. He stated it is experi- 
mental and will be reviewed after one year, based on how well 
the students have demonstrated their responsibility. Dean Field 
stated that visiting hours privileges would be granted only on an 
individual house basis. It is expected the policies at each house 
will be quite different, depending on the desires and votes of the 
residents . 

Trustee Gordon expressed the hope that the students would 
respect the property in the residence halls, just as the Trustees 
have indicated their consideration for their good judgment in 
handling the visiting hours privilege. 

Chairman Healey stressed the extreme sensitivity of the 
situation. The Board, he said, in taking action as recommended 
is placing complete confidence in the student body. He described 
the incalculable harm that could result to the entire university 
community if the trust is violated. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve for a period of one year, beginning 
in September, 1968, the implementation of Resi- 
dence Hall visiting policies set forth in Docu- 
ment T68-074 entitled "Administrative Statement 
on Residence Hall Visiting Policy," which docu- 
ment becomes a part of these minutes. 

The Chairman of the Student Activities Committee then 
introduced the recommendation, tabled at the previous meeting, in 
order to allow the Board opportunity for further study, that a 
campus humor magazine be permitted. He stated the recommendation 
was made on the basis set forth in the constitution that the 
publication would be under the control of the Student Senate; 
also, the Student Communications Board and faculty advisors. 

Discussion was held. Provost Tippo described the steps 
taken to insure an improved and quality publication. He stated, 
last September a Bill of Particulars was directed to the group 
which listed objections and suggestions. These included correc- 
tions as to the duties of the advisors, insuring they would see 
the copy for the entire issue; provision that the faculty advisors 
would be approved by the President; also special consideration by 
the staff with respect to sensitive issues such as sex, race, 



3075 



Humor 
Magazine 



3076 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



religion and politics. They have attempted to spell out these 
precautions.. A suggestion that the name be changed was not 
adopted. Suggestion was made that they might explore the possi- 
bility of publishing off campus. The students feel they would 
have better control of the publication if it were published on 
campus. They also feel that if it were published off campus it 
would still be subject to criticism which would be reflected on 
the University. 

The Provost introduced Professor Isadore Silver, Chair- 
man of the Student Communications Board, a joint committee of 
students and faculty. 

Professor Silver stated the Student Communications 
Board has been working with the YAHOO group for two years and has 
had meetings for 15 consecutive weeks with successive groups of 
editors on all issues including elections, budgets, constitution 
and control. The present staff is an entirely new group . Pro- 
fessor Silver expressed confidence in the abilities of the stu- 
dents and felt they should be accorded an opportunity to revive 
the publication. He noted that the Faculty Senate has endorsed 
YAHOO; the Student Senate has endorsed it, and the Communications 
Board has devoted a tremendous amount of time and work in an 
effort to resolve the differences. He stated the campus community 
is overwhelmingly in favor of YAHOO'S republication. 

Mr. John Poirier, Financial Manager for YAHOO, was 
invited to address the meeting. He said it appeared that the 
principal concern was one of control of YAHOO to insure that stu- 
dents did not radically step out of line so as to jeopardize 
University programs. He noted that significant controls have 
been instituted. In addition, although only two issues are 
planned next year if the magazine is revived, request has been 
made that the Communications Board review the first issue, thus 
subjecting it to "feedback" of representative group of University. 

Mr. Poirier said the voting membership voted unanimously 
to retain the name and two motions are now pending in the Student 
Senate which say in effect they will not recognize a student 
humor magazine on campus under other than the name YAHOO. 

Trustee Gordon said he was impressed with the present 
concept and constitution of YAHOO in its control factor. However, 
he suggested it be published as YAHOO off campus. He affirmed 
the right of the students to publish the magazine, but he did not 
see the involvement of the University as anything other than a 
restrictive or inhibiting force on the kind of a magazine proposed 

Mr. Poirier was recognized and stated that YAHOO intends 
to function as an educational as well as an entertainment publica- 
tion. It is already within the University framework. It cannot 
do its job effectively off campus, he said, for it would not then 
be able to avail itself of the services of competent University 
advisors. The magazine is intended as an educational process in 
which the students can learn and use their creative talents. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Maginnis expressed adamant opposition to the use 
of the name YAHOO, though no objection to publication of a humor 
magazine • 

Trustee Croce said there is a place in the University 
for a humor magazine; it has some value educationally. He ex- 
pressed confidence in the new constitution and in the safeguards 
established in order to avoid the mishaps of the past. He ques- 
tioned the use of the former name which he said has become odious 
throughout the state. 

The President of the Student Senate explained the sup- 
port of the student body for the former name. He stated it was 
felt the publication would be so improved there would be no need 
to assume another name. He explained that the name YAHOO is a 
tradition at the University and likened it to the name of a build- 
ing. Further, with reference to publishing off campus, he stated 
it would not then be a University humor publication. 

Trustee Plimpton stated he would salute anyone who 
could write any humor with a constitution as tight as the one 
proposed. 

Chairman Healey stated his unqualified endorsement of 
the DAILY COLLEGIAN, the campus newspaper, and his willingness to 
vote its continued support. But he reiterated the troublesome 
history and deep and permanent damage caused by YAHOO. He expres- 
sed great respect for the integrity and responsibility of the 
students appearing at the meeting in support of YAHOO, but stated 
he did not feel the student body should be taxed in order to 
support the publication. He stated there "would have to be a 
great period of insulation" before he would be willing to support 
it. If the name were changed and a completely different focus 
given, he might reconsider; but to bring back this controversial 
publication at this time would be a great mistake. He pointed 
out that if there is a great demand for YAHOO, then certainly 
those who wish it should be willing to pay for it and not subject 
the student tax funds to this expense. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed concurrence with Trustee 
Croce 's view, but stated he also would vote against use of the 
name YAHOO. 

After further discussion, Trustee Croce moved an amend- 
ment to the general motion which excluded the name YAHOO for the 
humor magazine. 

Secretary McCartney, speaking for the University Rela- 
tions Office, noted that a consensus of the professional depart- 
ment heads in this area which has primary concern along with the 
President when trouble develops had concluded (in agreement with 
Trustee Gordon's views), that if YAHOO were revived as an on- 
campus publication - from a professional PR point of view - it 



3077 



3078 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

would not be possible to guarantee the Trustees that renewed diffi- 
culties would be preventable. It might well be published off- 
campus, however, where two results would ensue: (1) the editors 
of the publication would be free from all administrative pressure 
or restrictions; and (2) any indiscretions of the publication 
would not ultimately reflect adversely on the University, since it 
would have no official connection whatsoever with the campus. The 
Secretary stated that he was impressed with the sincerity and 
ability of the present group of students attempting to revive 
YAHOO, but that the long range problem remains: such groups of 
dedicated students move on in the passing of college generations, 
and others of lesser dedication and ability may well take their 
place. 



After further consideration, the motion as amended was 
moved, seconded, and it was, by show of hands 

VOTED : To consider the constitution for a new 
humor magazine at the University only 
with all references to the title YAHOO 
(or a similar title) excluded and deleted. 

The result: Five Trustees opposed; two 

abstaining and seven in sup- 
port of the motion. Trustee 
Gordon wished to be recorded 
in opposition, Trustees Haigis 
and Knowles as abstaining. 

It was then moved and seconded and, by show of hands, 

VOTED : To approve the constitution of a new, 
nameless campus humor magazine whose 
basic organizational structure, except 
for name, is detailed in Document 
T68-075, which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

The motion was carried with the following Trustees 
wishing to be recorded in opposition: Messrs. Healey, Gordon and 
McNamara. Trustee Knowles abstained. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that no state funds are 
involved in publication of the humor magazine. It is supported 
from the fund created by the tax imposed upon the student body 
by their own government. Administration of these funds, however, 
comes within the total purvue of the Trustees. 



Chairman Healey expressed the hope that, as a matter of 
courtesy, the Trustees would be advised when a name has been 
selected for this magazine. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Lyons, as the Board of Trustees' representative 
to the Board of Higher Education, then reported the BHE had voted 
approval of the proposal to establish a Law School on. the campus 
at Amherst. The Board of Higher Education also noted with appre- 
ciation for being kept informed of the development of a program 
leading to Master of Arts and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and 
the development of a program leading to Master of Regional Plan- 
ning. 

Trustee Gordon complimented the Office of University 
Relations on the publication of recently inaugurated "University 
Newsletter." Trustee Maginnis drew attention to a fine week-long 
series of articles devoted to the University in the WORCESTER 
TELEGRAM. President Lederle introduced the author, Miss Magiera, 
to the Board. The Board accorded Miss Magiera a rousing round of 
applause. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



3079 



Board of 

Higher 

Education 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, BOjard of Trustees 



3080 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 

President' s 
Comments 



Dean of School 
of Education-- 
Dean Dwight 
Allen 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



May 31, 1968, 2:00 p, 



m. 



Board Room, Amherst, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, Vice Chairman Healey, 
President Lederle; Trustees Croce, 
Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, 
Haigis, Lambson, Knowles, Lyons, 
Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret. 
Thompson, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Dean Redfern, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Planning Officer UM/Boston 
O'Brien; Miss Coulter. Guests : Dean 
Allen; Architects: R. Scott Quinlan 
of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, D. H. 
Ramseth of Ellerbe Associates, Donald 
Ritchie of Ritchie Associates, Inc., 
Peter Moyes of Ritchie Associates. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 
2:00 p.m. Vice Chairman Healey presided. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made and seconded, and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of May 3, 1968. 

The Chairman asked for the President's comments. Presi- 
dent Lederle stated that at the last meeting the Trustees had ex- 
pressed interest in meeting the new Dean of the School of Education, 
Dean Dwight Allen was then introduced to the Board and invited to 
address the meeting. 

Dean Allen said the school is in a very exciting period 
with prospects next year of a greatly expanded faculty which will 
include a Rhodes Scholar and several distinguished graduates of 
outstanding colleges and universities. Some persons have been re- 
cruited outside of the discipline of education narrowly conceived 
because the field of education is in a period of transition. 
Scholars in the behavioral sciences and outside disciplines will be 
called upon to examine and construct programs in the field. The 
Dean announced that a grant in the amount of $100,000 had been re- 
ceived from the Federal Government to build a model elementary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

teacher program. This is one of nine grants funded from 79 pro- 
posals made nationally. It is hoped to build a model for teacher 
education to be used widely, but first of all implemented here, in 
terms of a new conception of teacher education. Next year will be 
a planning year. The entire faculty will have time allocated for 
planning. The catalogue of courses for 1969-70 has been discon- 
tinued in the sense that all present programs, courses and require- 
ments will be set aside for examination. They will be replaced in 
the program, after consideration on the same basis and justifica- 
tion as new programs and new sets of requirements. This insures 
that the power of the combined faculty will be brought to bear more 
sharply on the problems of education. 

Schools of Education in the past have been preoccupied 
with training of teachers. Leadership has not been engaged in the 
process of scholarship sufficiently because of time consumed in 
routine preparation, Dean Allen said. 

Examining the process of teacher education will be one of 
the main focuses for the scholarly investigation of the school. 
Competing programs of teacher education at the undergraduate level 
are planned. The process of teacher education will be experimented 
with to make it intellectually stimulating and to add to the social 
relevance of the process of teacher education programs. The Dean 
expressed the hope that some of the things tried would have enough 
potential to succeed in a dramatically different way, so that they 
would also have the potential to fail. He stated there is wide- 
spread and genuine dissatisfaction with teacher education and quote^ 
Beveridge, the great English scientist: "at certain points in a 
discipline you advance a discipline from within; at certain points 
in the history of a discipline to advance a discipline you have to 
gain outside perspective." Education is at a point where an out- 
side perspective is necessary, Dean Allen stated. 

The Dean said that scholars interested in the problems of 
the disadvantaged will be brought to the campus. The under- 
graduate program will be directed toward service to the Common- 
wealth. A graduate program is envisioned which will be of national 
consequence. A modest beginning in a vocational education program 
will be made next year under federal funding (salesmanship training 
at the high school level) . Programs of continuing education need 
to be expanded. The emphasis in the next decade will be on in- 
service teacher education rather than pre-service education, Dean 
Allen predicted. Formulas for staff differentiation will be de- 
veloped. He explained that under present practices, the way to im- 
prove the quality of education is by reducing class size, although 
in fact an outstanding teacher in a large class is better than a 
poor teacher in a small class. A career inventive for teachers to 
spend a lifetime commitment in the classroom should be developed. 



3081 



3082 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Course 
Proposals 

UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The goal of restructuring the profession of education is 
a big one. It is hoped to build bridges with other schools in the 
academic community at the University in an effort to find imagina- 
tive answers. A proposed Center for Innovation in Education and 
other programs and ventures will be submitted at a future time to 
the Board. 

Dean Allen noted that, if a professional school is to make 
a strong contribution, it is not inexpensive. 

President Lederle then informed the Board of two new books 
published by the University of Massachusetts Press: Figures of Dead 
Men by Leonard Baskin and The Satirical Rogue on Poetry, a 
collection of essays by Robert Francis. 

The President concluded his comments by reporting that an 
employee bargaining election had been held on Monday. Results were 
circulated to the Trustees. Election process went off well for a 
first venture and it is hoped to move forward from this base. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was given by Chairman Troy. He said the meeting held May 21 
provided opportunity to discuss in depth the whole problem of new 
courses, since both UM/Boston and UM/ Amherst had prepared and pre- 
sented schedules of course additions. Discussed were: the general 
rate of increase and reasons for it; comparison with comparable in- 
stitutions in relation of faculty members to the number of courses 
taught; how these increases affect the ratio of 15-1; effect on 
budget; whether the method of screening new courses is sufficiently 
rigorous. Discussion was detailed and comprehensive because in the 
past members of the Board had indicated concern over possible pro- 
liferation. The Provost, the Dean of Arts and Sciences and his 
assistant were present; also the Dean of the Graduate School and de- 
partment heads. All participated in the discussion. As the 
minutes indicate, the programs and procedures are both rigorous and 
moderate. They follow the general pattern of development in other 
institutions and, if anything, are more conservative than practices 
elsewhere in the pace of development of new courses. 

Chairman Troy stressed that Amherst has 75 departments 
and programs; 55 masters degrees; 40 doctoral programs. If each 
department were to propose 1 new course, he said, it would amount 
to more than 70 each year. Actually only 55 were added this year 
at Amherst. The English Department, for example, has more than 
1500 undergraduate majors and 100 faculty members. There could be 
fewer advanced courses and innumerable divisions in those courses, 
but instead we have diversity and a large number of courses. This 
is preferred by both students and faculty. It enables faculty to 
teach in areas in which they have greatest interest and prominence. 
This does not affect the budget, since the same number of students 
are taught and the same number of teachers and classrooms are re- 
quired. This applies also to other courses such as history and 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

languages. Also, basic changes and development in the sciences 
create the need for the curriculum to reflect new areas of study 
and knowledge that appear from year to year, such as biophysics, 
molecular biology, computer science, etc. 

It was pointed out also that the graduate program 
leading to the doctorate started late. Chairman Troy compared the 
20 masters and fewer than a dozen Ph.D. programs offered in 1962 
to the present number of 55 masters and 40 Ph.Ds. This meant the 
program had to move rapidly. 

Chairman Troy stressed that the number of courses 
offered does not basically affect the budget so long as the ratio 
of 15-1 is maintained. It is the sense of the Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy, the Chairman stated, that in the future 
new programs will be scrutinized with great care, but proposals for 
new courses within established departments, should not be a matter 
of committee concern. Such recommendations are pro forma at best; 
Trustee review and action are not required at other institutions. 
Mr. Troy expressed the intention of asking the committee for a 
formal vote incorporating this philosophy at the next meeting. He 
then presented two votes recommended by the committee. On motion 
made and seconded, it. was 

VOTED : To approve the Course Proposals, 1968-69 
for UM at Boston campus as shown on Docu- 
ment T68-082. 



VOTED : 



It was also 

To approve new courses for UM at Amherst 
as shown on Document T68-085. 



Trustee Thompson commended the committee for the 
hard work evidenced by the report. 

Chairman Troy described the UM at Boston proposal 
for a Junior Year in France. He stated that after thorough 
discussion of all phases of the program, advantages as opposed to 
disadvantages, including consideration of the current unrest in 
France and the effect on student living conditions, it was decided 
to recommend the program for Trustee approval. Acting Dean Gagnon 
has affirmed that it is a tightly organized program which will be 
under the direction of a thoroughly competent director. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the proposed UM at Boston Junior 
Year in France (Document T68-083) subject 
to presidential approval of the budget. 



3083 



New Courses 
UM/ Boston 



New Courses 
UM/ Amherst 



UM/ Boston 
Junior Year 
in France 



3084 



TRUSTEE 

Tuition 
Scholarships 
for Foreign 
Students 



Out-of-state 
Students 



Latin 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A proposal to increase tuition scholarships for foreign 
students was then described by Chairman Troy (Document T68-087) . 
The University now grants 15 tuition scholarships and, due to the 
increase in the number of students, the faculty committee has 
recommended an increase in the number of scholarships to foreign 
students. Trustee Troy drew attention to the fact that there were 
60 foreign students in 1959. Now there are 341. The Chairman 
recognized the value of this program, but stressed again the value 
and importance of encouraging a greater national mix of students on 
campus. He said the natural provincialism of our university could 
be offset by greater geographical spread. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To increase tuition scholarships for 

foreign students from 15 to 20, and to 
request the committee responsible for 
reviewing tuition scholarship candidates 
to give special emphasis to granting 
tuition scholarships to undergraduate 
foreign students. 

Provost Tippo advised the Chairman that the need to 
broaden the national mix of students has been brought to the 
attention of the Faculty Senate and it would be considered next 
year. 

President Lederle drew attention to the fact that the 
out-of-state enrollment, as authorized by the Board of Trustees, is 
5%. When he first came to Amherst, the University did not admit 
out-of-state students. He described the embarrassment this has 
caused, for example, during fund drives when out-of-state alumni 
complained they had been unable to enroll their children at the 
University, although schools of quality such as Cornell and Michigar 
did admit them. In view of this, it should be pleasing to know 
that enrollments have jumped from less than VL to the 5% allowed. 
The President also stated that Massachusetts as a whole exports to 
public institutions in other states 5800 students (1963 figure) and 
accepts about 780 from other states in its public educational in- 
stitutions of the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Healey emphasized that it is very important for 
the Legislature to understand the broad implications, because when 
budgets are discussed, the matter of the numbers of out-of-state 
students accommodated is always adversely considered. 

Chairman Troy then described a proposal to add three 
Latin courses. Professor Lawall has reviewed the entire Five 
College cooperative program in classics and discussed it with 
representatives of each college. It was concluded that cooperation 
with the program can continue. Letters directed to Chairman Troy 
indicate the Five College group would be happy to see general 
strengthening of classics at the University. Discussion was held. 



3085 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

We have explored the opportunities available through Five 
Colleges, Inc. and are receiving maximum use from courses offered 
at other colleges, Provost Tippo added. There is general agreement 
that the demand is greater than the available room. It is, there- 
fore, desirable to add the three Latin courses proposed. The 
Provost stated one Latin course has 41 students, another has 39 
students. The courses proposed will not be duplicated within the 
Five College curriculum. There were 62 vacancies for Latin 
teachers in Massachusetts last year, the Provost said. He added 
that 301 Massachusetts high schools offer first year Latin courses. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve three Latin courses: 

Latin 326 (Latin Didactic Epic) 

Latin 327 (Latin History and Biography) 

Latin 328 (Latin Drama) as shown on Document T68-086 

The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was 
given by Chairman Haigis. With reference to the UM at Boston site 
search, he stated a meeting scheduled with the Boston Redevelopment 
Authority on Monday had been cancelled due to illness of the 
Mayor's representative. The meeting has been rescheduled for the 
following week, at which time it is hoped to learn the result of 
studies made by the BRA with reference to the possibility of ex- 
pansion west from the Park Square area now occupied in part by the 
University. 

Chairman Haigis invited Dean Soutter to introduce the 
architects for the Worcester hospital for the presentation of plans 
Associate Dean Stockwell then briefly described the 403 bed 
hospital as having all of the normal functions of diagnosis and 
treatment usually found in any teaching center of this type. In 
addition, the hospital will serve as a clinical education center 
for medical education and many allied fields of health. One 
hundred thousand out-patient visits are contemplated annually. All 
of the departments that have basic and clinical offices in research 
will have their inpatient facilities on the same level of the 
hospital. 

Messrs. Ritchie and Moyes of Ritchie Associates 
summarized the project and its architecture. The recently com- 
pleted final studies, approved by the Medical School and the various 
departments as meeting the program requirements for the hospital 
phase, were displayed. The interrelationship between the floors 
of the hospital and the medical science building was pointed out. 
This will facilitate teaching and maximum flow of staff and stu- 
dents from one area to the other. There are four floors in the 
base and seven floors in the tower of the building. A series of 
slides were shown to graphically illustrate the layout. 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



Medical 
School - 
Worcester 



086 



Shaw 
Building 



UM/Boston 
Renovations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Moyes stated that 25 feet were cut from the overall 
length of the building, which has reduced the cost an estimated 
$1 million. The basic functions required for the project will still 
be supplied. Trustee Pumphret inquired whether any of this sum had 
subsequently been lost to inflation. An estimated $100,000 a month 
could be lost to escalation if the project goes beyond the 1972 
completion date, Mr. Moyes stated. Inflation during construction 
is in the budget. However, the time schedule set by the government 
has been met. To date nothing has been lost to inflation. 

There being no further questions, motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve preliminary plans for the Medical 
School-Hospital as submitted by the firms of 
Ritchie Associates and Campbell, Aldrich & 
Nulty, Ellerbe Associates as consultants. 

Chairman Haigis then asked Dean Soutter to present the 
proposed plan for renovation of the Shaw Building in Worcester. 

Dean Soutter said this building containing approximately 
48,000 square feet was purchased for about a half a million dollars 
It is proposed to use it for teaching the first and second medical 
school classes. The building will then be used for another twenty 
years for other educational purposes in the para medical field to 
derive full benefit from the expenditure. Basic education of people 
in the various allied health professions will be provided here. 
The architects have considered the subsequent use, including con- 
version of certain areas to laboratories as set forth in the pro- 
posed plan. The building required a good deal of repair, in addi- 
tion to the proposed alterations. 

Mr. Quinlan then presented plans for the building. He 
estimated the total project cost would be within the $1 million 
dollar budget imposed. Sixteen students will be accommodated the 
first year, with space for a future laboratory (not furnished at 
this time) in event the main medical science building is not ready 
at the end of the first year. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : TO recommend to ehe Board of Trustees approval of plans 
for renovation of the building at Belmont and Lake 
Streets in Worcester for use by the UM Medical School. 

The Chairman then presented plans for the renovation of 
buildings at the Boston Campus. He stated the priorities as follows 

1. approval of plans to utilize the $750,000 
currently available. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. urging that Driimmey, Rosane and Anderson 
be authorized to proceed with designs in- 
volving the 1.560 million dollars ex- 
pected to be available in fiscal 1969 as 
recommended by the Governor. 

3. the problem with the fourth floor of the 
Sawyer building, in terms of its suitability 
for office space because of lack of auditory 
privacy for faculty and students due to 
partial partitions, making it necessary to 
lease additional faculty office space. 

Chairman Haigis invited Chancellor Ryan to speak on the 
proposed renovations. Chancellor Ryan stated that 53 new faculty 
members and administrators will be added in Boston in September. 
The fourth floor of the Sawyer building is already inadequate to 
accommodate the 90 members of the humanities division now assigned 
there. A solution is required that involves leasing some addi- 
tional space. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To accept the UM at Boston Phase III 
Renovations Schedule and the proposed 
space acquisition by lease, and space 
allocation at UM/Boston for the 1968-69 
academic year as detailed in Document 
T68-079 with the exception that the 
Chancellor's Office and associated 
executive offices shall remain in build- 
ing #1 at 100 Arlington Street on file 
in the Office of the Secretary. 

Chairman Haigis presented a recommendation for renovation;: 
in buildings under lease. There being no discussion, motion was 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To carry out renovations in buildings 
under lease to the University at UM at 
Boston on the basis of the present 
owners contracting for the work and re- 
covering the expenses through increased 
lease charges. 

Two proposals for namings were then submitted by Chairman 
Haigis. Document T68-081 (map of campus) was supplied to the 
Trustees in advance of the meeting showing proposed names for 
respective locations as designated. 

There was discussion during which it was agreed, in accorc 
with Trustee Troy's suggestion, to substitute "Presidents" for 
"Presidential" (Drive) . 



3087 



3088 



Map of Amherst 
Campus 



TRUSTEE 



Horace M. 
Jones 
Memorial 
Garden 



Murray D, 

Lincoln 

Land 



Parking 
Garage Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the names, as amended, indicated in 
red on Document T68-081 (a large map of 
the Amherst campus) be adopted for the 
respective locations as designated. 

A permanent copy of this map will be kept on file in the Office of 
the Treasurer. 

Chairman Haigis apprised the Board of the wish of the 4-H 
group to name the area in front of the relocated 4-H buildings 
(Farley and Bowditch Lodges) the Horace M. Jones Memorial Garden, in 
honor of this deceased member of the faculty of the College of Agri- 
culture, who served as a State 4-H Club Leader from 1942-56. A 
memorial fund established at the time of his death in 1966 in the 
amount of $400 is available for making suitable recognition of this 
honor. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To designate the area directly in front 
of the Farley and Bowditch 4-H Club 
Houses the Horace M. Jones Memorial 
Garden in accordance with a plan on file 
with the Treasurer. 

Trustee Haigis then advised that the State of Ohio re- 
quires for a state highway a small part of the land given to the 
University by Murray D. Lincoln; part as an outright taking and part 
for an easement. The state is offering $9,100 as damages and the 
proposal recommends $12,344 (on advice of the Trustees of the Murray 
D. Lincoln Trust). Treasurer Johnson said the damages are not great 
as the highway is going across the extreme corner of one end of the 
property. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to negotiate with the State of 
Ohio, Department of Highways, and to 
execute appropriate documents to re- 
linquish 2.333 acres in takings and .508 
acres for an easement, with retention of 
oil rights, on land given to the Univer- 
sity by Murray D. Lincoln and indicated 
on a map on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

The final plans for the parking garage were presented. 
Vote was deferred pending appropriate action by the Legislature and 
Governor on the enabling bill. It was noted that the next meeting 
of the Trustees on June 28 will provide opportunity to vote on 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



acceptance of these plans, also to present 
Building Authority on this project. 



formal request to the 



Treasurer Johnson stated the plans have been reviewed in 
great detail. Corrections have been made for the Building 
Authority by the architect that the University recommended. The 
plans are in excellent shape. The Building & Grounds Committee has 
also reviewed the plans and is ready to recommend them just as soon 
as the Building Authority is prepared to proceed. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the Board of 
Trustees will proceed with the formalities as soon as the techni- 
calities are completed. 

The Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds Committee ad- 
vised that the Amherst Selectmen had requested that the Old Town 
Road be closed to conform with the details of the campus master 
plan. 



There being no questions, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : That Old Town Road on the north side of 
the campus be closed in accordance with 
a plan on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

The Civil War Library and photographic collection of the 
military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Massachu- 
setts Commandery, has been offered to the University as a "perma- 
nent loan." This includes 16,000 Civil War photographs by Matthew 
Brady together with other documents and artifacts. The collection 
has been in the Armory now used as a library by UM at Boston. The 
Buildings and Grounds Committee recommends acceptance of the offer. 

Chairman Healey asked what the legal responsibility would 
be if the University accepted the offer since they would not be 
owners, but merely bailees. Chancellor Ryan stated the matter has 
been reviewed by Attorney Broadhurst who indicated that acceptance 
by the University would be in order. 



After further discussion, motion was then made, seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED : 



To accept the permanent loan of the library 
and collection of photographs as described 
in a letter dated May 22, 1968 and signed 
by William H. Shreve, Commander of the 
Massachusetts Commandery of the Loyal Legion; 
the terms of which are set out in Document 
T68-090 attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 



3089 



Old Town 
Road 



Civil War 
Memorabilia 
UM/ Bos ton 
Library 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University 
Relations 

TRUSTEE 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Emerson, as Chairman of the Committee on Govern- 
ment and University Relations, reported on a meeting held May 24 in 
Boston. He stated that President Lederle reviewed for the 
committee the general government and University relations posture of 
the University. Dean Redfern discussed the current situation on 
legislation as related to the University. In addition, it was 
recommended that an outside agency examine the University's govern- 
ment and legislative relations. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the President communicate with 
Mr. Bonham, President of Science and 
University Affairs, and arrange an 
early meeting of the Government and 
University Relations Committee at 
which Mr. Bonham or an associate could 
describe the proposal of his firm in 
detail. 

President Lederle stated that Document T68-088, Personnel 
Actions, had been circulated in advance of the meeting. The members 
of the Board having had opportunity to read and discuss these docu- 
ments, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T68-088, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
May 4, 1968 to May 30, 1968 as detailed in 
Document T68-088A, which document is here- 
with attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the pro- 
fessional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as here- 
after determined by the Board of Trustees or 
under their authority. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 

Titles effective on and after July 1, 1968, 
as detailed in Document T68-089, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 

The President then recommended that the Board approve 
granting of degrees, graduate and undergraduate as appropriate, 
subject to the persons on each list meeting the requirements as set 
forth. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the list of degrees awarded as 
of June 1, 1968 subject to each individual 
meeting the requirements as applicable. 

Trustee Gordon introduced to the meeting his guest, Mr. 
Paul Crane, a board member of the National Scholarship Service and 
Fund for Negro Students located in New York. He stated this group 
is a national leader in this field. Mr. Crane had met with 
Professor Johnson, Deans Tunis and Allen and others to give con- 
sideration to establishing dialogue between a private foundation 
in New York and the University of Massachusetts in this very crucia 
area. 

Treasurer Johnson stated a listing of proposed budget 
transfers had been distributed to the members in advance of the 
meeting. The most significant transfer was for the UM at Boston 
summer school for supplies and library materials. It was noted 
that approximately 600 students are already registered for this 
first summer session. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 



3091 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



Degrees 



3092 



TRUSTEE 



Transfers 
Between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve the following transfers: 

Account 1350-01 - Amherst 

From: 09 - Farm and Grounds 

This sum was accumulated by de- 
ferring purchase of needed 
plantings to cover essential 
needs in other accounts. 

To: 10 - Travel 

Primarily expense of recruitment 
of new faculty. 

11 - Advertising and Printing 

Printing of additional Summer 
School catalogues and advertising 
for vacant positions 
16 - Rentals 

To provide transportation by 
rented buses for students in 
nursing to hospitals in the 
Springfield area and for other 
required student field trips. 

Account 1350-02 - Boston 

From: 08 - Heat and Light 

12 - Maintenance and Repairs 
16 - Rentals 

To: 13 - Educational Supplies 

These transfers are necessary 
to provide educational supplies 

for the new Summer School 
starting in June and for 
essential library materials. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 



$19,000.00 



$14,000.00 



$ 1,000.00 



$ 4,000.00 



$40,000.00 
18,000.00 
35,000.00 

$93,000.00 





Robert/^. I McCartney 
Secretary, /Bostrd of Trustees 




3093 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 28, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Gordon, Haigis, Healey, 
Kiernan, Lambson, Lyons, Pumphret, 
Rowland, Thompson and Troy; Secretary 
McCartney, Treasurer Johnson. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Dean 
Hunsberger, Associate Dean Wagner, 
Attorney Broadhurst and Miss Coulter. 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by 
the Chairman at 2:15 p.m. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees for May 31, 1968. 

The President then reported that notice had been received 
of an award of federal funds for the Medical School in Worcester. 
He asked the Dean of the Medical School to describe the award. 

Dean Soutter said $13.8 million had been awarded for the 
medical sciences building and library, and approximately $4.9 for 
research facilities. Although a request had been filed for $25 
million, in these days of austerity, the Dean said, we are fortu- 
nate and grateful for the sum received. He expressed great appreci^ 
tion for the efforts and continued interest of Senators Brooke and 
Kennedy and Massachusetts Congressmen which helped to bring about 
favorable action. 

Dean Soutter described an official visit on June 27 by 
the federal site examiners. Representatives of the National Ad- 
visory Council on Education for Health Professions appeared quite 
satisfied with the plans for the Medical School hospital at 
Worcester. Several Worcester area hospital officials and doctors 
as well as members of the faculty and Trustees joined the group who 
met with the examiners. Dean Soutter indicated that $23 million 
in federal aid is sought toward the total cost of about $38.6 
million for the hospital. It is expected that the advisory council 
will meet in November to take final action on federal fund applica- 
tions for the 400 bed hospital, the second phase of construction 
planned for the Medical School complex. 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



President ' s 
Comments 



Medical 
School 



3094 



TRUSTEE 



Campus 
Center 



Continuing 

Education 

Center 



Parking 
Garage 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Attorney Austin Broadhurst, counsel for the Building 
Authority, next described for the Board a series of authorizations 
required in order to initiate the project to construct the Campus 
Center. He described in addition a proposed resolution to approve 
the working drawings and specifications. Chairman Haigis of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee informed the Board that previous 
discussion had been held on this matter and approval extended in 
prescribed fashion. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To adopt the following preambles and 
resolutions : 

WHEREAS University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority (the "Authority") is 
authorized by Chapter 773 of the Acts 
of 1960, as amended, (said Chapter 773 
as amended being hereinafter referred to 
as the "Enabling Act") , among other 
things, to construct buildings and 
structures upon written request made by 
authority of the Trustees (the "Trustees") 
of the University of Massachusetts (the 
"University") and upon determination by 
the Trustees that a project is designed 
primarily to provide facilities for, 
among other things, the housing, feeding, 
medical care or extra curricular use by 
University students, staff and dependents; 
and 

WHEREAS on April 21, 1966 the Trustees adopted a 
vote authorizing a request to be made to 
the Authority, among other things, that 
it undertake a project to provide for 
dining facilities, housing facilities 
and extra-curricular facilities at the 
campus of the University in the towns of 
Amherst and Hadley substantially as out- 
lined in the document entitled "University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Continuing Education Center Feasibility 
Study July 1965" by Marcel Breuer and 
Herbert Beckhard, Architects, and others, 
and such request was made; and 

WHEREAS on January 31, 1967 the Trustees adopted 
a resolution authorizing a request to be 
made to the Authority that it enlarge said 
project to provide parking garage facili- 
ties, and such request was made; and 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



WHEREAS on August 29, 1967 the Authority re- 
quested the concurrence of the Trustees 
in a reduction in the scope of the said 
project to eliminate the parking garage 
facilities and that Trustees concurred 
in such reduction; and 

WHEREAS the Trustees now desire to restore the 
scope of said project to include park- 
ing garage facilities; Now, Therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED that John W. Lederle, President 
of the University, be and he hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the Trustees to make a written request 
of the Authority that it undertake a 
project to provide dining, housing and 
parking garage and other extra-curricular 
facilities at the campus of the University 
in the towns of Amherst and Hadley, that 
the facilities to be provided by such 
project include substantially those out- 
lined in the"Massachusetts Continuing Edu- 
cation Center Feasibility Study July 1965" 
by Marcel Breuer and Herbert Beckhard, 
Architects, and others, plus parking 
garage facilities for approximately 1,000 
cars and that such project incorporate the 
existing student union facilities; and 
that the undertaking by the Authority of 
new construction and the acquisition of 
the existing student union building to 
provide such facilities and the provision 
and installation by the Authority with 
respect to or in said construction and 
building of furnishings, furniture, 
machinery, equipment and facilities and 
such related approaches, driveways, parking 
areas, planting and landscaping as may here- 
after be approved by authority of the 
Trustees be and the same hereby is determined 
to be a project designed primarily for the 
housing, feeding or medical care of or extra 
curricular use by University students and 
staff or their dependents, including those 
uses mentioned in Section 3 of the Enabling 
Act; that the aforesaid vote adopted April 
21, 1966, the aforesaid resolution adopted 
January 31, 1967, and the requests made 
pursuant thereto be and hereby are amended 
accordingly; and that said concurrence be 
and hereby is amended accordingly. 



3095 



Continuing 

Education 

Center 



Parking 
Garage 



3096 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 



parking 
Garage 



VOTED : That the working drawings and detail speci- 
fications presented to this meeting and pre- 
pared by Marcel Breuer and Associates for the 
parking garage to be constructed by University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority as a part 
of the Eleventh Project of the Authority pur- 
suant to request made June 28, 1968, modifying 
earlier requests, each made by authority of 
the trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
be and hereby are approved; that John W. 
Lederle, president, and Kenneth W. Johnson, 
treasurer of the University, be and each acting 
alone is authorized to endorse the approval 
hereby given upon one or more sets of said 
working drawings and detail specifications; 
and that any requirement of approval of pre- 
liminary plans or drawings or preliminary or 
outline specifications for said dormitories be 
and hereby is waived. 



The following resolution was also 



Contract for 

Financial 

Assistance 

Eleventh 
Project 



VOTED : That the making of an Amendment to the Contract 
for Financial Assistance dated as of January 
31, 1967 between The Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts and University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts 
of 1960 as amended and providing, among other 
things, for an increase in the Maximum Cost of 
the Project to which such Contract pertains, 
be and the same hereby is authorized; that the 
form of such Amendment presented to this meet- 
ing and each term, condition and provision there- 
in contained be and the same hereby are approved; 
that said Trustees or a majority thereof be and 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on behalf 
of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts to sign, 
acknowledge if deemed advisable and deliver an 
Amendment in the form presented to this meeting 
and providing, among other things, for a Maximum 
Cost of the Eleventh Project, as defined in said 
Contract, of Eighteen Million Five Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($18,500,000) and to cause the 
common seal of said University and of said 
Trustees to be affixed thereto; and that the 
taking of such action by said Trustees shall be 
conclusive evidence that the same is hereby 
authorized and that the form of Amendment so 
executed is as hereby authorized and approved. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Pumphret of the Finance Committee reported 
briefly on a meeting held June 19, 1968, with the financial ad- 
visors at which time the Endowment Fund was reviewed. The minutes 
of the meeting were circulated to the members of the Board to 
afford opportunity for detailed review. In accord with committee 
recommendation after discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Johnson to execute 

changes in the University's investment port- 
folio in accord with recommendations of 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 

Chairman Pumphret described a recommendation that a Trust 
Fund established by the parents of Ilene Sharon Saval be converted 
to an Endowment Fund (Document T68-097) . Motion was thereupon made 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Ilene Sharon Saval Scholarship 
(Trust) Fund in the amount of $1,736.00 
be established as an endowment fund for the 
purpose of awarding annually one or more 
scholarships in the amount of $100 to an 
entering student or students at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, said students to be 
from the city of Revere, Massachusetts (or 
elsewhere in the state if no qualified stu- 
dent from Revere can be found) ; awards shall 
be made to students considered worthy and 
needy as determined by the University 
Committee on Scholarships and Financial Aid. 
Any excess income remaining after annual 
awards have been made shall be added to the 
principal . 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was made by Trustee Rowland. Mrs. Rowland reported that 
discussion on procedures for decisions affecting development and 
authorization of new courses was held. The result was a recommenda 
tion to the Board that, in the future, such decisions should be 
left solely in the hands of the faculty and administration. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That henceforth the review of single new 

courses be left to the faculty and administra- 
tion, with the understanding that an annual 
report will be made each year to the Trustees 
in which the number of new courses added and 
the number withdrawn will be stated; and, 
further, that all new degree programs and new 
curricula will be taken to the Trustees for 
approval in conformance with current practice. 



3097 



Report of 

Finance 

Committee 

Endowment & 

Operating 

Fund 



Ilene Sharon 
Saval 

Scholarship 
Fund 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



New Courses 



iOQ 



Proposal to 
Modify Cer- 
tain Core 
Curriculum 
Requirements 



Ph . D . in 
Anthropology 



Lectureships, 
School of 
Education 
UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rowland reported that discussion was held on a 
proposal to modify certain core curriculum requirements, in which 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences presented options for 
Speech 101 and English 125/126 for College of Arts and Sciences 
students. The committee recommends the adoption of this proposal. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the proposal to modify core 
curriculum requirements for College of 
Arts and Sciences and other University 
students (option for Speech 101 and 
English 125/126 as detailed in T68-095, 
which document is made a part of these 
minutes. 

Professor Lee, Head of the Department of Sociology and 
Anthropology, presented a proposal to establish a Ph.D. in 
Anthropology at Amherst. After discussion this also is recommended 
by the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Motion was accordingly made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Ph.D. degree be authorized and 

established in the field of Anthropology. 
(Document T68-098) 

The Dean of the School of Education described to the 
committee a proposal to establish two lectureships in the School of 
Education at the University in Amherst. He stated a special 
government training act allows government employees to take leave 
of absence (with pay) to further professional training. The proposed 
lectureships would be one year appointments in education, for per- 
sons in the middle ranges of government service and would be a com- 
bination of advanced training, with some service to the University, 
They would teach one course per semester and take substantial 
graduate work. Each lectureship would carry a $2,000 award and an 
award citation. Trustee Rowland reported that this proposal has 
also been recommended by the Faculty and Educational Policy Committe 



was 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



VOTED : That two named lectureships be established 
in the School of Education, each carrying 
with it a $2,000 award and an award citation; 
the first to be named The Horace Mann 
Lectureship in Public Education Policy; and 
the second, to be named The John Quincy 
Adams Lectureship in International Education 
Development. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the June 19 meeting of the committee, Mrs. Rowland 
said, Dean Allen also explained a proposal to establish a Center 
for the Study of Educational Innovations in Amherst. It was stated 
the school now has a grant of $100,000 to study new curriculum re- 
visions in education and it is possible that further federal sub- 
sidies amounting to $ 1 million per year for a five-year period may 
be obtained. Establishment of the Center for Study of Educational 
Innovations would permit the School of Education to pursue grant 
support systematically. 



Motion was made 
VOTED : 



seconded, and it was 



To establish at UM/ Amherst a Center for 
Study of Educational Innovations at the 
School of Education. 



Trustee Rowland reported that Dean Allen wished to move 
toward establishment of a Ph.D. program in Education. This 
prospect will be studied in detail during the coming academic year 
along with a general review and evaluation of the undergraduate 
curriculum. Ninety three major universities in the United States 
offer a Ph.D. degree in Education. It was the sense of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy that consideration of 
this proposal is very important. The actual proposal will be 
brought before the Board in detail at a future meeting. 

An Interdepartmental program in International Agri- 
cultural Studies has been proposed by Dean Spielman. This would 
involve undergraduates, would add an additional (fifth) year to the 
curriculum and would involve one year abroad. There is a possi- 
bility of Peace Corps support for sending students and faculty 
abroad. The proposal places special emphasis on programs in Africa 
because of the background and experience of the University in this 
region. 

After consideration, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That an Interdepartmental Program in Inter- 
national Agricultural Studies be authorized 
and established at the University of Massa- 
chusetts in Amherst. (T68-099) 

Trustee Rowland then briefly cited the report of Pro- 
fessor Feng of the Department of Civil Engineering on the Environ- 
mental Engineering option in his department at Amherst. The Ph.D. 
and M.S. degrees are emphasized, as well as research. The reason 
for the option is that there is a requirement taking 2% years to 
qualify for entrance to the Ph.D. degree program in Civil Engineer- 
ing, but there is no need for such a long time to be spent in the 
Environmental Engineering option. This would mean the department 
could reduce the number of prerequisites. No vote was required. 
(Document T68-100) 



3099 



Center for 
the Study of 
Educational 
Innovations 
UM/ Amherst 

Ph.D. in 
Education 



Interdepart- 
mental Pro- 
gram in Inter- 
national 
Agricultural 
Studies 
UM/ Amherst 



Report on 
Environmental 
Engineering 
option in 
Civil Engi- 
neering De- 
partment, 
UM/Amherst 



3i00 



TRUSTEE 



Subsidiary- 
Accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Rowland described the President's comments on the 
desirability of establishing a University system-wide committee on 
graduate work. The University at Boston will provide graduate pro- 
grams in the foreseeable future and there is a need for a pan- 
University group of faculty and administrators from all phases of 
the system to focus upon problems of establishment of curricula, 
advanced degrees, etc. 

The report of the Executive Committee was made by Chair- 
man Healey. He invited Treasurer Johnson to submit and explain the 
transfers between subsidiary accounts which are recommended by the 
committee. Treasurer Johnson described the necessity of making 
transfers created by the lack of operating funds in certain accounts 
It had been hoped that a deficiency bill would remedy this situation 
but no such bill materialized. In order to meet the summer school 
payroll, funds must be transferred from those accounts reserved for 
terminal pay for academic year teachers who are leaving the Univer- 
sity, but whose annual salaries were spread over twelve months end- 
ing August 31. It has been customary to pay terminal salaries in 
June upon termination. In addition, funds committed in -08, -15 and 
-16 must be unencumbered and commitments shifted in -08 to dormi- 
tory accounts. Expenditures in -15 and -16 will be deferred. After 
further discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the transfers between subsidiary 
accounts as listed below: 



Account 1350-01 Amherst 
From: 01-salaries, permanent positions 
02-salaries, temporary positions 

To: 03-salaries, non-employees 

From: 08-heat, light, water, etc. 
15-equipment 
16-rentals 



To: 



14-administrative expense 



$113,000 

37,000 

$150,000 

$150,000 

$ 35,000 

25,000 

4,000 

$ 64,000 

$ 64,000 



President Lederle stated the operating budget for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1968 had been circulated. He drew 
attention to the fact it is a very tight budget, that it does not 
offer prospects for many quality improvements. There are no funds 
for new programs, for ETV or for various other programs the Univer- 
sity had hoped for. He stressed the need for support staff in order 
to do a quality job both in Amherst and Boston. The President said, 
unless additional funds are provided, the 1969 summer session will 
have to be cut by at least a thousand students. 



After further discussion and comment, 
seconded and it was 



motion was made. 



i 



I 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To confirm and approve the Operating Budget 
for the fiscal year 1969 as detailed in 
Document T68-092 

With reference to the search for a UM/Boston site, Chair 
man Haigis of the Buildings and Grounds Committee reported that a 
meeting had been held with representatives of the BRA and the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce during which discussion took place on possi- 
bilities in the North Station area. BRA offered to make an in 
depth study including a model. Sufficient interest was evidenced, 
Chairman Haigis said, so that a formal request was made of the BRA 
to make a study in depth for consideration by the committee. 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates will be asked to work with BRA on 
the study. No vote was required, nor motion submitted. 

President Lederle stated that the Personnel Actions had 
been circulated. He recommended their acceptance. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Actions 

as detailed in Document T68-091, together with 
Supplement #1, which document and supplement 
are herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
June 1, 1968 to June 27, 1968 as detailed 
in Document T68-091A, together with Supple- 
ment #1, which document and supplement are 
herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees with respect to professional per- 
sonnel under provisions of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and 
descriptive job specification for each posi- 
tion to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, trans- 
ferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 



3L01 



Operating 
Budget 



UM/Boston 
Site - 
North 
Station 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



o i no 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Schedule of 
Board Meet- 

TRUSTEE 

ings for 
1968-69 



President Lederle drew attention to the proposed Schedule 
of Board Meetings for 1968-69. He suggested a change in the 
September date from the 19th to the 12th, because of the timetable 
for submitting next year's budget request. He asked the Board to 
consider the proposed dates and communicate their recommendations 
to the Secretary. 



The President then invited the members of the Board and 
others present to remain for a half hour after the meeting to view 
the recently completed University film, sound-color film, "Giant 
Step." 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 






Rober 
Secretary, 



McCartney 
lard of Trusteed 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



August 12, 1968, 2:00 p.m. 



. Board Room, Whilmore Administration Build- 
ing, Amherst 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle ; Trustees 
Croce, Crowley, Emerson, Healey, Lambson, 
Knowles, Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret 
Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter; 
Acting Dean Gagnon and Planning Officer O'Brien, 
UM at Boston. 



] 







The provisions of Chapter 626of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by the 
Chairman at 2:45 p.m. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of the Board 
of Trustees for June 28, 1968. 

The President noted with regret the resignation of Dean 
Edward Moore as Dean of the Graduate School and Director of 
Research. 

Trustee Troy requested that the Board of Trustees extend 
special recognition in the form of a citation of appreciation to 
Dean Moore, to be drawn by the Secretary and incorporated as a part 
of these minutes. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To extend to Dean Edward C. Moore, retiring head 
of the graduate and research programs, an appro- 
priate citation of appreciation for his services 
in developing the Graduate School, Research Program 
and the Massachusetts Press to high levels of 
distinction during his period of tenure at the 
University, said citation to be incorporated in 
these minutes as Document T69-006 

CITATION 

The Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts herewith conveys to Edward C. Moore 
its felicitations and appreciation for outstanding 
service to the University in Amherst as Dean of the 
Graduate School and Coordinator of Research, noting 
that during his tenure (August 1, 1962 to August 
31, 1968) the campus research program has grown 



3 LOS 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Moore, 
Edward C, 
Citation 



31.04 



President ' s 
Comments 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



from less than one million to more than seven 
million dollars annually; also, that under his 
direction, the University of Massachusetts Press 
was founded, and within a few short months has 
risen to national distinction, producing more than 
36 volumes since 1965. While expressing sincere 
regret at his departure, the Board extends every 
good wish for continued successful achievement 
throughout a long and distinguished career in the 
service of higher education. 

The President called attention to the fact that, due to a 
six billion dollar reduction in Federal monies available for domesti 
programs, there may be a substantial deduct in Federal grants avail- 
able to the Medical School from the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare. 

Provost Tippo commented further that a letter had been 
received from the National Science Foundation indicating that grant 
monies already distributed will be cut back. The Provost termed 
this "a severe and traumatic experience." A smilar letter has been 
received from the National Institutes of Health. The cuts involved 
are on the order of 107, to 207o. 

Dean Soutter referred to copies of correspondence received 
from the Office of House Speaker McCormack (a similar letter has 
been received also from Congressman Conte) describing the restric- 
tion in Federal monies available for the Medical School. If funding 
of awards already made are delayed or reduced, the Dean suggested 
that this involved the following alternatives: 

a. A delay in the beginning of construction 
for Medical School facilities 

b. The Federal government might choose to 
discharge its commitment at so much on 
the dollar 

Either course of action would be bad for the prospects for 
the Medical School. Dean Soutter is hopeful that the grants may be 
made as originally allotted so that construction on the Medical 
School can begin on time. These funds could then be paid back 
retroactively, even four or five years from now when, hopefully, 
Federal funds will be available. 

President Lederle noted that the matter of retroactive 
payment of funds had been broached to the Massachusetts congression- 
al delegation. It is clear that the mandate to cut Federal funds 
for domestic programs is binding, but certain programs are being 
exempted (e.g. the Post Office Department). It is probable that 
medical schools should likewise be exempted. It was noted that the 
AFL-CIO recommendations for action to both political parties in this 
election year stress the need for dollars for medical education. 



D 



TRUSTEE 



a 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Pumphret commented on an article in the BOSTON 
GLOBE on August 11 citing the almost certain prospect of such 
Federal cutbacks, and the harmful effect this will have on medical 
schools in private institutions who now find themselves in the same 
fix. 

President Lederle expressed the hope that a breakthrough 
might occur at least on funds for medical school construction. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To direct the administration to bring every 

effort to bear with the Governor of the Common- 
wealth and with the Massachusetts congressional 
delegation to exempt medical school construction 
from current Federal domestic program spending 
cuts and/or to urge the Congress and appropriate 
Federal agencies to authorize construction of 
such facilities without delay on the basis of 
retroactive payment of Federal matching funds. 

Chancellor Ryan reported that bids were opened on lease 
space for academic and administrative office requirements at UM at 
Boston on Friday, August 9. These bids were satisfactory, having 
come in at $193,345.00. It was also pointed out that UM at Boston 
must develop the means for meeting its additional classroom require- 
ments by expansion in the Sawyer Building. The additional lease 
space is within an acceptable walking distance (five or six minutes) 
of the central facilities at 100 Arlington Street and vicinity. 



3L05 



was 



After brief discussion, upon motion made and seconded, it 



VOTED : That the basis of distance, occupancy date 
and cost the following bids for additional 
lease space at the UM at Boston be accepted: 



1 



Address 

131 Arlington -'St. 



80 Boylston St. 
(Floors 5,7,8) 



308 Boylston St. 
172 Columbus Ave, 
TOTAL 



Annual Rent 
$58,905.00 



For offices for : 
Admissions, Registrar, 
Advising, Classics 
and German 



60,000.00(est.) French, Italian and 
Spanish 



19,000.00 

55,440.00 

$193,345.00 



Mathematics 
English 



3106 



Report of 
Committee on 

TRUSTEE 

Buildings & 
Grounds 



UM/ Bos ton 



Amherst 

Fire 

Station 



Addition to 
Health Services 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In the absence of Chairman Haigis, the report of the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds was presented by Trustee Emerson. 
Brief description was given from the minutes of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee meeting of August 1, 1968, and the following 
actions were taken: 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees approve the plans for 
renovations under contracts associated with Phase 
IV for renovations at the 100 Arlington Street 
building af UM at Boston, and to authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, to award the con- 
tract for this work to the lowest qualified and 
eligible bidder. 

It was also 

VOTED : That they confirm the award of the contract on 

Phase III to the low bidder, R. A. Caputo Company 

of Belmont, Massachusetts in the amount of $498,669.00. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees herewith expresses 
favorable interest in moving forward together 
with the Town of Amherst to investigate the 
possibility of locating a fire station and 
dormitory facility at the corner of the Tillson 
Farm on East Pleasant Street opposite Eastman 
Lane, together with a review of traffic 
circulation patterns throughout the campus 
with particular emphasis on closing North 
Pleasant Street to vehicular traffic between 
Ellis Drive and the West Experiment Station. 

Acting Chairman Emerson reported briefly on the intention 
of the ad hoc UM/Boston Site Committee, including Trustees Gordon, 
Crowley, Healey and Committee Chairman Haigis to confer with Messrs. 
Champion of the Boston Renewal Agency and Kelso of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce so that the Board of Trustees may be advised at 
the earliest possible date concerning the real prospects for 
acquisition of a permanent site possibility for UM at Boston. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To proceed with stages one and two of Massachusetts 
State Project U68-3, Additions to the Health Ser- 
vices Building, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Based on a proposal presented by Dean Warren McGuirk of 
the School of Physical Education as outlined in Document T69-003, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To convey to Dean McGuirk the interest of 
the Board of Trustees in exploring further 
the possibilities outlined in his proposal 
(Document T69-003) for the establishment 
and construction of a Convocation and Athletic 
Center. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the design of a north entrance 
road to the campus in Amherst in 
accordance with a plan on file in the 
Treasurer's Office. 

Trustee Emerson noted that the Board of Trustees had pre- 
viously considered acquisition of the last piece of land called for 
under the original Master Plan, a plot presently owned by Peter A. 
and Mary M. Ostrowski. 



] 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



it was 



I 



VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 476, Acts of 1968, 
Item 8069-66, and other Acts authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire land, or 
land with buildings thereon, by purchase or by 
eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the General 
Laws, for the further development of the Univer- 
sity; independent appraisals of the value of the 
land and buildings, if any, having been made by 
qualified disinterested appraisers and filed with 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; that the Trustees 
of the University purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Peter A. and Mary 
M. Ostrowski (supposed owners), consisting of 22.2 
acres, more or less, located in Hadley and Amherst, 
Massachusetts, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Hadley and Amherst, Massachusetts to be 
acquired by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the use of the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts," dated June 20, 1967, and prepared by 
Gordon E. Ainsworth and Associates; said parcel 
being that described in Book 1052, Page 279 of 
the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds; and that 
the award for said property be Forty two thousand 
one hundred twenty-five dollars. ($42,125.00) 

Thereupon, the Trustees affixed their signatures to the land taking 
instrument. After brief discussion and on motion made, it was 



3l07 



Convocation 
& Athletic 
Center 



North 

Entrance 

Road 



Ostrowski 
Property 



3108 



Traffic 
Regulations 

Modification 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the traffic rules and regulations 
approved by the Trustees be further 
amended as follows: (Dashes through words 
and figures indicate deletions; underlined 
words and figures indicate additions.) 

ARTICLE II. AUTHORITY AND DUTIES OF POLICE, 
Section 2 

Amend as follows: 

Section 2, Assistance - The President, 

Treasurer, Provost, Dean of Students, 

and/or the Chief of the University 

Police may request the assistance of 

the Tewn-e£-Arahersfe police of other towns 

wherein University lands are situate , 

and/or the State Police^ whenever in 

their judgment such assistance is necessary. 

ARTICLE IV. ILLEGAL PARKING, Section 4 

Add the following sentences: 

Any vehicle found without a valid license 
plate attached will be considered an 
abandoned vehicle and removed from Univer - 
sity property. The owner will be 
responsible for costs involved in removing 
and the storage of such vehicles. The 
University assumes no responsibility for 
the care or protection of, or damage to , 
any such motor vehicle or its contents . 

ARTICLE V. TOW-AWAY ZONE REGULATIONS, Section 6 

Add the following new sub-section (d) : 

(d) In any fire zone or fire lane . 

President Lederle observed that the Personnel Actions had 
been circulated to the Trustees, and he recommended their 
acceptance. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T69-001, together 
with Supplement #1 and Supplement #2, which 
document and supplements are herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes, with the 
deletion of Donald VanLiew. 



D 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period June 29, 1968 to August 11, 1968 
as detailed in Document T69-001A, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees with respect to professional per- 
sonnel under provisions of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and 
descriptive job specification for each posi- 
tion to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, trans- 
ferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or 
under their authority. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 

Titles effective on and after July 1, 1968, 
as detailed in Document T68-002, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classifi- 
cation shall not be designated by any job 
group number or grade. 



The meeting was adjournetKat 3:20 p.m 



) 



Robert 
Secretary, 



3109 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 




3L10 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
September 12, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Crowley, Emerson, 
Frechette, Gordon, Greenblatt, Haigis, 
Healey, Kiernan, Lambson, Knowles ,• 
Lyons, Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, 
Rowland, Thompson, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Soutter, Acting 
Dean Gagnon, Dean Redfern, Business 
Manager Hrady, UM/B Planning Officer 
O'Brien, Miss Coulter; members of the 
press and television media. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Boyden called the meeting 
to order at 2-15 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulatec 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of August 12, 1968. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, President Lederle 
commented on the favorable news from Washington of a federal fund- 
ing grant for the University Medical School. He asked Dean Soutter 
of the Medical School to provide details for the Board. 

Dean Soutter advised that a federal funding grant of more 
than $13.8 million for the education and library portion of the 
Medical School had been received. A further request is still pend- 
ing for additional funds related to research. The Dean advised the 
Trustees that the Health Research Facilities branch of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare has a backlog of approved 
projects in excess of $40 million, and an operating budget of only 
$9 million this year. It is, therefore, unlikely that the Univer- 
sity will actually receive the money from the research grant this 
year. 

Dean Soutter then read a letter from the Chief of the 
Health Research Facilities Branch of the Division of Research 
Facilities and Resources of the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare (Document T69-012) , outlining the procedure which would 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

allow the University to proceed with the construction of the re- 
search portion in advance of actual receipt of federal funds. The 
Dean requested formal Board approval of the prescribed course of 
action. 

On motion made and seconded (and in accord with 
recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds) , it was 

VOTED : That Dean Soutter be authorized to proceed 
with the design and construction of the 
Medical School in accordance with the proce- 
dures outlined in a letter dated August 28, 
1968 from the Chief, Health Research 
Facilities Branch, Division of Research 
Facilities and Resources. 

President Lederle next informed the Board that Trustee 
Croce had been appointed by Governor Volpe to serve as a member of 
the Building Authority. Congratulations on this honor were ex- 
tended. 

Expressing deep regret, the President announced that 
Trustee Hugh Thompson had advised of his impending resignation from 
the University's Board of Trustees, effective October 15, 1968, due 
to relocation of his permanent residence to New Hampshire. The 
President recalled the long years of meaningful service and deep 
friendship which Trustee Thompson had given to the University. He 
noted that two sons of the Trustee had attended the institution, 
also, that among other things, he had seemed like an Ambassador of 
Labor, always reflecting the best interest of this segment of the 
Commonwealth. It was noted that Trustee Thompson would leave a 
monument at the University in the Labor Relations and Research 
Center which he was instrumental in establishing. 

Trustee Thompson expressed his personal regret that he 
must tender his resignation to the Governor. He stated his apprecia 
tion to the Board for the many years of happy association and ex- 
pressed the hope that the Governor would see fit to appoint another 
representative of Labor to the Board, noting that he had been the 
first Labor man named as a University Trustee. 

Chairman Boyden endorsed the statements of the President 
and the members of the Board of Trustees and stated that Trustee 
Thompson had made tremendous contribution over the years. 

The detailed minutes of the meeting of the Executive 
Committee, held August 28, 1968, having been supplied to the Board, 
Trustee Troy as Acting Chairman drew attention to the recommenda- 
tions for the first commencement of the University at Boston next 
June (Document T69-007) . He noted that no honorary degrees would 
be given, except possibly to the commencement speaker, and that 
further discussion is being postponed pending the arrival of the 
new Chancellor in Boston. 



3L11 



Trustee 
Croce 
Building 
Authority 

Trustee 

Thompson 

Resignation 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

UM/Boston 
Commencement 



112 



Transfers 
between 
Subsidiary 
Accounfcf^E 



Preliminary 
Draft of 
Master Plan 



1970 Budget 
Policy Issues 



Student Union 
Transfer to 
Building 
Authority 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Chairman Troy advised that inadequate financial 
support in some areas has made it necessary to transfer funds be- 
tween subsidiary accounts (Document T69-008) , in order to maintain 
minimal level academic operations. The highly restrictive budgets 
for fiscal 1969 created an acute situation which would have 
necessitated, among other things, closing the library during certain 
hours, and similar drastic curtailments. The committee discussed 
at length the problem created by three restrictive budgets in 
succession. Communications from Deans and Department Heads setting 
out the critical nature of their needs, and the fact that an addi- 
tional 1500 students were added to the Amherst campus this year, 
were carefully considered. 



After deliberation and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED: To approve the transfers between subsidiary 
accounts as detailed in Document T69-008. 

The Executive Committee had also reviewed the Preliminary 
Draft of the Master Plan. Provost Tippo in presenting the draft 
stated that it is still flexible and subject to change. After 
further conferences with faculty, student and other groups, it is 
expected that the Plan will be complete and will then be presented 
to the Board of Trustees. 

Acting Chairman Troy reported that the President circulated 
Document T69-009 to the committee - General Budget Policy Issues for 
1970 - and this was discussed in detail (as described in the 
minutes of that meeting) . Particular reference was made to the need 
for more adequate operating funds. The effects of the recurring 
cuts in the budget were thoroughly examined. It was stressed that 
the inevitable results will be (1) elimination of all new programs 
and/or (2) a cut in enrollment. The matter was left that a serious 
effort would be made to acquaint the Governor with the depth of the 
problem. 

Treausrer Johnson notified the committee that Attorney 
Broadhurst is preparing papers to be discussed with the Attorney 
General's office with reference to the transfer of the Student 
Union to the Building Authority. These will be submitted to the 
Board of Trustees when in final form. 

Vice Chairman Healey reported that a meeting had been held 
to consider the matter of honorary degrees. The large number of 
names submitted from various sources had been reviewed and pre- 
liminary screening has been completed. Another meeting will be held 
to further refine the list, after which it will be presented to the 
Board. The Vice Chairman reminded the Board that the list is held 
confidential and will be presented at an executive session for 
possible additions or deletions. 



3113 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The report of the Buildings and Grounds Committee was 
made by Chairman Haigis. He advised that a meeting had been held 
with Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, in which the architectural design 
of the Medical School building had been discussed. Scale model and 
sketches, as well as photographs of the proposed building were 
viewed. As soon as architectural advisor Dean Pietro Belluschi has 
an opportunity to go over this presentation, it is expected tinat a 
recommendation will be made to the Board. 

With reference to Treasurer Johnson's negotiations for the 
University in connection with the Murray D. Lincoln Trust, authori- 
zation is needed in order to effectuate the course of action 
authorized at the May 31 meeting of the Board of Trustees. After 
discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, Kenneth W. Johnson, be and hereby is 
authorized to execute a contract of Sale and 
Purchase and all other instruments as may be 
necessary to effectuate the fulfillment of the 
terms and conditions therein, between the Board 
of Trustees, University of Massachusetts and the 
State of Ohio, pertaining to lands and rights of 
the said Board of Trustees in said lands situated 
in Ohio, County of Franklin and designated by the 
Ohio Department of Highways as Parcels Nos . 
113-WL and 113-U, Section 20.40 N; that the con- 
sideration to be paid by the State of Ohio be in 
the amount of $11,200 for the execution of said 
contract of Sale and Purchase and for the fulfill- 
ment of the terms and conditions therein, all as 
recited in a copy of said contract on file with 
the Office of the Treasurer. 

Chairman Haigis affirmed the course of action described 
earlier by the Dean of the Medical School (Document T69-012) which 
would allow the University to proceed with construction of the 
Medical School in advance of actual receipt of the funds requested. 
He stated the committee at its meeting endorsed the procedure as 
outlined. 

Consideration of a permanent site for the University at 
Boston has continued and is now down to two possibilities: North 
Station and Columbia Point. No further sites will now be con- 
sidered. A decision will be forthcoming within two or three weeks 
as soon as the committee has received firm answers to some as yet 
unresolved questions. The Board of Trustees will hold a special 
meeting in Boston in order to vote the final choice. 

Vice Chairman Healey stated: "I do not think this decision^ 
in fairness to the people it serves, can be delayed any longer." 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



Murray D. 

Lincoln 

Land 



Medical 
School 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



3114 



Operating 
Budget Re- 
quest for 1970 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



Wareham 

Cranberry 

Station 

Gift of Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle submitted the OPERATING BUDGET REQUEST 
FOR FISCAL YEAR 1970 (Document T69-013) . In summarizing, he stated 
that the Amherst campus will continue to grow at its established 
rate. This fall there are 1500 additional students. Boston has 
approximately 3500 students registered. The President noted the 
dramatic growth of the Boston campus within three short years. He 
said he knew of no comparable rate of growth for a new campus in so 
short a time. 

The President drew attention to the request for funds 
needed for library expansion. He stated that the library is the 
heart of any institution. Funds are also needed for adjustment of 
the base appropriation to compensate for under-appropriations in 
recent years. He explained that appropriations for non-personnel 
expenditures have not kept pace with the increase in enrollment and 
faculty. This has created the need for funds to prevent deteriora- 
tion of some academic programs below minimum levels. The Funds for 
New Programs section included sums required for the Program for 
Disadvantaged Students. 

President Lederle noted that these financial plans now 
reflect the increase in the amount required for the Medical School 
since 1970 will be the final year before the school is in actual 
operation. He advised that the University is getting almost the 
equivalent of half the cost of the first building from the Federal 
Government. 

After further comment and consideration, motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the Operating Budget Request 
for Fiscal 1970, as detailed in Document 
T69-013, which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

Chairman Boyden called for the report of the delegate to 
the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Lyons responded that the 
BHE meeting would not be held until the following week. He added, 
however, that the Board had been hampered by under staffing, due to 
the lack of funds. However, some studies have been made which have 
been thorough and proved useful including one on libraries. The 
nursing needs of the Commonwealth have been the subject of one re- 
port. There has been recent addition of staff support and a re- 
organization of the Board to insure that members of the committees 
will rotate. Chancellor Millard, Trustee Lyons stated, has been 
doing as effective a job as can be expected in view of his shortage 
of support staff. 

President Lederle advised that the Provost and several 
Trustees had represented the University at the Wareham Cranberry 
Station recently during the annual meeting of the Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers' Association. One of the University's great 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

contributions is research in the area of cranberries, he said. He 
invited Provost Tippo to continue the report to the Board. 

The Provost announced that a three acre parcel of land, 
consisting of five lots, was offered to the University by the Cape 
Cod Cranberry Growers' Association, to aid the growth and develop- 
ment of the Experiment Station in East Wareham. The addition of 
this parcel would bring the total acreage of the facility to approxi 
mately thirty. Included is a ten-acre cranberry bog. Three build- 
ings, including a new 11,000 square foot laboratory building and a 
greenhouse are in full use at this University station. The Provost 
said the station has expanded its traditional role as a cranberry 
research facility to related areas including pesticide breakdown. 

After discussion and comment, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To accept with appreciation the deed to 
five lots (approximately 3 acres) con- 
tiguous to the East Wareham Cranberry 
Station, presented by Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers' Association, as shown on the 
deeds on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

President Lederle informed the Trustees that as the Uni- 
versity grows in quality, it attracts Federal grants. These con- 
sist largely of enrichment of established programs. He described 
the manner in which these funds are used and the operation of the 
programs, utilizing graduate students where possible. The Provost 
then announced that, although the University had been awarded about 
$4 million from the National Science Foundation, word was received 
this week that only about $1 million in actual funding would be re- 
ceived for fiscal 1969. This is due to the cut of $6 billion in 
the Federal domestic program budgets by action of Congress. The 
severity of the cut means a halt to faculty research and growth 
grants; it will seriously affect the operating budgets of the Uni- 
versity Press and library appropriations. Provost Tippo said the 
cut means that summer research programs cannot be carried on; also, 
that foreign travel budgets for faculty would be eliminated. In 
addition, new research equipment orders must be withdrawn. The 
Treasurer and the Dean of the School of Engineering will go to 
Washington this next week to find out exactly what steps, if any, 
can be taken to effect full or partial restoration of the funds. 
The President pledged his support through every available avenue 
to seek the return of these funds to the University budget. 

The President next presented Personnel Actions which had 
been circulated to the Board in advance of the meeting. 



3L15 



After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



Federal 

Grants 

Cutback 



3116 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel 

actions as detailed in Document T69-010 
together with supplement #1, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period August 13, 1968 to September 11, 
1968, as detailed in Document T69-010A, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now 
in effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees with respect to professional 
personnel under provisions of Chapter 75 
of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 
648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification 
for each position to which a member of 
the professional staff is hereby appointed, 
promoted, transferred or determined shall 
be as hereafter determined by the Board 
of Trustees or under their authority. 

It was then 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any job 
group number or grade. 

Chairman Boyden called for "Other Business." Trustee 
Maginnis queried whether the road conditions on the Amherst campus 
would be improved in time for the "Homecoming Weekend" next month. 
President Lederle replied that with more than 16,000 students back 
on campus, the whole pattern changes and new paths appear in the 
grass overnight. However, it is hoped to have the main roadways 
in order by the October meeting time. He noted that the Southwest 



3117 







UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Complex is now completed. This provides accommodations for 5600 

students. Four years ago this land had just been acquired. Here 

again, the University has achieved outstanding results in record 
time. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:27 p.m. 






Rober 
Secretary, 



/J. McCartney 
Soard of Trustee 



1 



J 



3118 



TRUSTEE 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
October 14, 1968, 3:10 p.m., Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, 
Gordon, Haigis, Healey, Kiernan, 
Lambson, Knowles, Lyons, Maginnis, 
McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland. 
Troy; Secretary McCartney, Treasurer 
Johnson. 



Chancellor Broderick, Dean Redfern, 
Miss Coulter, Mr. Melley; Messrs. 
Sasaki, Alexander and Chapman of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates; 
UM/Boston students and faculty; 
members of the press. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 
3:15 p.m. by Chairman Boyden. 

Chairman Boyden invited the Vice Chairman to preside 
at the meeting. 

Vice Chairman Healey welcomed the members of the faculty 
and student body of the University at Boston; also the members of 
the press and others who were present. He expressed appreciation 
for their interest in the selection of the permanent site for the 
University at Boston as evidenced by their attendance. He said a 
great deal of time and effort had been spent by the Trustees in 
arriving at a decision. He urged them to listen to the discussion 
attentively, stating: "we may learn from one another." Vice Chair- 
man Healey then asked the Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds to submit his report. 

Chairman Haigis advised that, in order to acquaint the 
meeting with the background, including the kinds and depth of 
material compiled and considered during the investigation of site, 
Mr. Sasaki of the firm of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay Associates would 
review the basic procedure. 

Mr. Sasaki, assisted by Mr. K. E. Alexander and Mr. M. 
Perry Chapman of his staff, by means of slides and accompanying 
dialogue, reviewed the analyses and the criteria; also the previous 
studies made and other highlights of the intensive search for the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston permanent site. 

Working in collaboration with the Trustees and the Uni- 
versity administration, Mr. Sasaki said that factual data was 
accumulated for a series of sites suggested by University officials, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



community leaders, realtors and public agencies as well as the 
consultants themselves. All sites were evaluated in accord with 
established site criteria as shown on a projected slide. The over- 
riding question was: Will this particular site be an asset or 
liability as the University grows and develops programs keyed to 
the needs of the urban areas of Boston? More than 50 site possi- 
bilities were considered. These were indicated on a map posted at 
the meeting. All sites were evaluated by comparing the physical 
and locational aspects of each in terms of the established criteria, 
The Trustees gave consideration also to: 

1. The University's impact on adjacent areas 

2. The influence of the area on development of 

University programs 

3. The effect of the location on the enrollment mix 

as shown on the established site criteria. 

Mr. Sasaki informed the meeting that all fifty sites were 
grouped according to zones, based on the distance from the downtown 
core. He noted that the minimum acceptable site size changes as 
one moves from the core area, due to lower building densities and 
the need for additional parking. Accordingly, if a site were larger 
than the minimum (as shown on a projected slide) this was considered 
a site advantage. 

Slides were projected showing Minimum Site Area, Average 
Travel Time (to and from each site) and 1975 Transit Times. 

Mr. Sasaki stated that, after the first investigative 
review by the Trustees, those sites with significant limitations 
were eliminated from further consideration. This left fifteen sites 
under consideration. These were deemed to have the best combina- 
tion of favorable factors according to the site criteria categories. 
Emphasis on accessibility required analysis from a transportation 
viewpoint. Accordingly, the Trustees and University officials 
conferred with urban experts and community leaders to explore this 
aspect of the sites under consideration. As a result, in coopera- 
tion with the DPW, the area within a 30-45 minute trip from a 
particular site was plotted and compared to distribution of 
sutdents 1 homes in accord with slide shown. 

Surveys revealed that 627, of the students enrolled at 
UM/Boston live in the fifteen "inner cities" of Boston. Studies 
also revealed the degree of accessibility to the largest number and 
whether by use of public transport or automobile. 

As a result, the Trustees felt that three sites: Watertown 
Columbia Point and Turnpike-Air-Rights were superior to others. 
Final investigations were undertaken. At the suggestion of Mayor 
White and Speaker Quinn, sites in the North Station area and 
Fenway Park were included in these investigations. 



3119 



i20 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Sasaki showed aerial photo slides of the three sites: 
Columbia Point, North Station and Turnpike-Air Rights. He noted 
that the BRA prepared studies on the North Station site and that 
his architectural firm prepared studies on the Turnpike site. The 
results were presented to the Trustees and revealed excellent loca- 
tional advantages (cultural and continuing educational opportuni- 
ties) , but considerable limitations on site size which would in- 
hibit development flexibility, staging and functional arrangement. 
Accordingly, a site accommodation study for the Columbia Point site 
was presented for study. 

The Columbia Point area has the advantage of adequate 
acreage. It is one of the larger of the more than 50 sites 
evaluated. Mr. Sasaki pointed out the attractive vista across 
Boston Harbor. He projected slides to illustrate his observation. 
The potential for further expension through land fill was described 
as a distinct asset. 

The transportation factor was described and illustrated 
using slides. The nearest public transportation (MBTA) is across 
Morris sey Boulevard and private property (about a mile away) . The 
possibility of a "sky-bus" system to link the campus to the MBTA 
was suggested. It was described as high speed and high capacity; 
also, automated, rubber tired, electrically operated and virtually 
noiseless. 

Mr. Sasaki stated that tentative conferences with owners 
indicated it would be possible to arrange for access across re- 
quired land for this purpose. This would provide quick and low cost 
public access, relieve congestion on the highway system and alle- 
viate parking demand on campus. Mr. Sasaki described the proposed 
traffic patterns to and from the site. He then proceeded to 
describe some facets of land acquisition. 

It was brought out that there are 130-150 acres of un- 
developed land owned by the Boston Housing Authority, the City of 
Boston, Boston College High School and a private owner, all of which 
can be expanded by filling operations. The minimum acceptable site 
size for this type of location for the University is between 80-100 
acres. This would not provide land for playfields and recreation 
use, or any reserve for expansion. 

Slides were shown indicating " Enrollment related to Build ' 
ing Space " and " Planning Program for Buildings ," among others. 

The subjects of soil conditions and aircraft noise were 
commented upon by Mr. Sasaki. He stated the noise is comparable to 
that of ground noise created at two downtown sites considered, 
created by rail and auto traffic. Soil consultants advise that 
foundations for buildings (five floors or less) would require 
caissons bearing on the clay crust. For taller structures, piles 
driven into rock would be required. Mr. Sasaki likened the soil 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

type to that of Back Bay, where the town houses are generally on 
piles driven into similar clay crust. He noted, however, that the 
quality of the fill at these areas is dissimilar and consolidation 
of fill would be much greater at Columbia Point. 

Utilities are not available at the Columbia Point site. 
Water mains must be extended and an effective sanitary system 
brought in. Present plans call for phasing out the present pumping 
station at Columbia Point. 

Mr. Sasaki then had slides projected to show a possible 
development plan for a campus at Columbia Point based on a central 
open court or common surrounded by academic buildings, with the 
Library and Science Center flanking the Central Court. Passage be- 
tween buildings would be possible through enclosed walkways. Ex- 
pansion could be obtained by adding fill to existing tidal flats. 

Chairman Haigis called for questions and comments. 
Trustee Pumphret inquired about the reaction of the Boston College 
High School to the proposed occupation of the neighboring site by 
the University. 

Vice Chairman Healey responded. He reviewed his conver- 
sations with the BCH and stated they appear to be happy with the 
area. In fact, they have plans for expansion. They have stated 
they would welcome the University as a neighbor and would enter in- 
to negotiations for sale of some of their land where required. He 
noted their wish that the access road be removed some distance from 
their residence halls to eliminate traffic noise. Also, they would 
like to retain rights to part of the shore area. 

Trustee Pumphret questioned whether negotiations had been 
held with the MBTA and whether in fact (as he had read in the press) 
the proposed plan of the University for rapid transit would be con- 
structed at MBTA or University expense. 

Chairman Haigis confirmed that the expense would be 
assumed by the University for the proposed transit link. He added 
that, as a result of preliminary negotiations with the MBTA, full 
cooperation had been assured in arranging passage from one platform 
to the other at Columbia station. In addition, the MDC has agreed 
to cooperate in arranging crossing rights over Morrissey Boulevard 
where required. 

Mr. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay said that mono- 
rail, or "sky-bus," transit time from the Columbia Point site to 
Columbia Station and thence by MBTA to the Park Street area would 
be approximately 12 minutes. Mr. Sasaki added that the actual 
physical distance to Park Square was equivalent to that from 
Harvard Square to Park Square. Although Columbia Point is isolated 
"physically and psychologically" at the present time, this factor 
can be surmounted. Indeed, the presence of the University at 



3121 



3122 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Columbia Point could be expected to attract housing and other de- 
velopments to which the campus could relate. 

Trustee Rowland drew attention to the fact that the pro- 
posed "sky-bus" could extend its transport capacity by the addition 
of numbers of cars on a double line. 

In response to question as to type of neighbors and 
facilities at this site, Mr. Sasaki said the University as a commu- 
nity would have cultural activities and facilities and in fact is a 
small community in itself. In addition, plans are under considera- 
tion for private housing in the area. The presence of the Univer- 
sity will stimulate other kinds of activities, he felt. Harvard 
has stimulated much of the development in the Harvard Square area. 
He noted that the University Trustees would insist on compatible 
use of contiguous areas, stating as an example that housing would 
be compatible, industry would not. 

In response to request, Mr. Alexander described the type 
and amount of fill which would be used. Some of it could be taken 
off the top of the site itself. New fill in an area as yet unfilled 
such as tidal flats, would normally require 10 years to settle. 

Chairman Haigis noted that UM/Boston Chancellor Broderick 
had been at the University for fourteen days and welcomed him. He 
stated the options for a site for the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston had been reduced to two. At a meeting of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds, earlier today, it was voted to recommend that 
the North Station site be eliminated from further consideration. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To eliminate the North Station area from 
further consideration as a permanent site 
for the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston. 

Chairman Haigis stated further that it was the recommenda- 
tion of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds that the only site 
under active consideration is the Columbia Point site and, further, 
that it is recommended that the final decision on this site be made 
at the November 22, 1968 meeting of the Board of Trustees at the re- 
quest of Chancellor Broderick of UM/Boston pending further study by 
the Board and the Chancellor. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : That the only site under active consideration 
by the Board of Trustees is the Columbia Point 
site; the final decision on this site will be 
made at the November 22, 1968 meeting of the 
Board. This action is taken at the request of 
Chancellor Broderick of the UM/Boston campus, 
pending further study by the Board and the 
Chancellor. 



3123 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Vice Chairman Healey addressed the meeting as it prepared 
to adjourn, stating the problem of selection of a site for the Uni- 
versity at Boston had been continuous for at least three long years, 
He said the Trustees had looked at all viable alternates that were 
available. He advised that the Chancellor had presented what the 
Trustees considered cogent reasons for leaving the decision open, 
but he urged those present and the groups they represented, to pre- 
pare their suggestions formally and submit them through proper 
channels . 



He counseled the students and faculty present to proceed 
with the same good faith evidenced at this meeting and said the 
Trustees are searching the same answers in order to create the 
finest possible University. He urged them to work together in a 
spirit of cooperation. He expressed the Board's interest in 
cogent reasoning, expressed through proper channels. Mr. Healey 
concluded, "This Board does not see any other viable alternate, 
(than Columbia Point) but we are willing to listen." He thanked 
all present for attending. The meeting was then adjourned at 
3:45 p.m. 



1 




Robert J. 
Secretary, 





^artney 
rd of Trustees' - / 



1 



3124 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 26, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Hampden Dining Commons, U of M, 

Amherst 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meetings 

Associate 

Provost 

J. M. Allen 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Crowley, Gordon, 
Haigis, Lambson, Knowles , Lyons, 
Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Soutter, Dean 
Redfern, Associate Provost Allen, 
Dean Field, Faculty Senate Repre- 
sentative Fenton, Business Manager 
Grady, Mr. Melley and members of the 
press; Messrs. Nulty and Quinlan of 
Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty; and Miss 
Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Boyden convened the meeting 
at 10:20 a.m. 

In order to provide an opportunity to discuss confidential 
matters within the purvue of the Executive Committee, motion was 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session for the purpose 
of considering candidates for honorary de- 
grees. 

It was then 

VOTED : To adjourn from executive session and con- 
tinue with the main agenda of the meeting. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meetings of 
September 12 and October 14, 1968. 

Chairman Boyden asked for the President's comments. 
President Lederle requested Provost Tippo to introduce to the meet- 
ing Dr. J. M. Allen, who recently joined the staff as Associate 
Provost. The Provost then introduced Dr. Jeremiah Allen to the 
meeting, briefly outlining his scholarly, academic and administra- 
tive background. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle asked the Dean of the Medical School to 
present for comment and approval the proposed exterior design of 
the Medical School. 

Dean Soutter stated that the external appearance of the 
Medical School has been the subject of a meeting of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee in September. Architect's costs and the 
comments and approval of Architectural Advisor Dean Belluschi were 
not then at hand. These have since been received. Dean 
Belluschi' s suggestions have been incorporated and the cost esti- 
mates submitted to the Bureau of Building Construction. It is 
suggested that the building be granite clad. The building will 
cost one quarter of a million dollars less than the estimate of 
last March. The BBC supports this. Dean Soutter then circulated a 
letter from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare 
commenting on the efficiency of this building and asking permission 
to copy the plans and distribute them to others as a model. The 
Dean noted that this shows the building is functional on the in- 
terior; but, of necessity, the exterior will therefore be plain. 
He advised that the faculty group has seen and approved the plans. 
He then introduced Mr. Nulty of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty. 

Mr. Nulty described the external treatment of the build- 
ing. He stated that the window frames will be bronzed aluminum, 
and demonstrated the style and manner of construction with a model 
of the proposed fenestration. Mr. Nulty advised that the massing 
of the building has been simplified. Granite facing is appropriate 
for such direct and simple facade, rather than limestone as had 
been considered previously. In response to question as to the colo: - 
and type of granite under consideration, Mr. Nulty exhibited two 
samples of granite, showing the general range of tone and color 
proposed. This will not be polished or rough, but will have a 
"honed" finish. Mr. Nulty stated the color would have the natural 
variance to be expected in natural granite and thus could not be 
accurately or specifically depicted at this time. The face of the 
stone and the face of the glass will be almost flush. 

Trustee Knowles questioned the practicality of this 
arrangement under conditions of rain and also sun glare. Mr. Nulty 
stated the cascades of rain would be broken by the slight granite 
recession as shown on display model. He then read Dean Belluschi 's 
letter (to Treasurer Johnson, dated September 11, 1968) in which 
the Dean expressed satisfaction with the design and recommended 
approval. This letter included question of a large expanse of 
glass on one area (connecting wing area) . Mr. Nulty stated this 
problem has been conquered by reducing somewhat the size of the 
glass in the area. 

Treasurer Johnson requested that an explanation of the 
construction of the building be made, with particular reference to 
the relation of glass, granite and metal in the design. Mr. Scott 
Quinlan described the proposed granite treatment, stating it will 



3125 



Medical 
School 

Exterior 
Plan 



3126 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be 2-3" thick, and will actually be hung on the building to make an 
interesting facade. Due to the simplicity of the building, it was 
felt that limestone, as originally considered, would be less 
attractive than granite. It was stated that although granite is 
more costly, ($119,000) the changes effected in the overall design 
have brought about a saving of one quarter of a million dollars. 
The simplified design is considerably enhanced by the use of granite 

Treasurer Johnson reported on a discussion held with 
Mr. Chase of the BBC in which it was agreed to use a granite facade. 
However, the Federal Government will not fund the increased cost of 
granite in lieu of the limestone originally proposed. The archi- 
tects have been requested to secure bids on both materials (granite 
and limestone) . 

Mr. Quinlan stated it will be quite possible to substi- 
tute granite for limestone in the plans. These will be presented 
in the bidding documents as alternates. 

Trustee Haigis informed the Board that the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds held a meeting on these matters and tenta- 
tively approved the plan, dependent on approval of Dean Belluschi. 
He noted that the Buildings and Grounds Committee had some reserva- 
tions about the external appearance of the structure as being too 
functional. The committee was assured by the architects that the 
use of the granite would supply a handsome effect. The committee, 
therefore, recommended approval of the design. Motion was then 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To accept the exterior design of the Medical 
School Building as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty. 

As a result of ensuing discussion, Dean Soutter advised 
that the plans and models for the Medical School construction have 
been exhibited several times in the Worcester community. He noted 
also that a meeting of the Board of Trustees is scheduled to be helc 
in the present Worcester offices in April. 

Chairman Boyden called for the report of the Executive 
Committee. This was given by Chairman pro tern Troy. He advised 
that the Executive Committee had considered and thoroughly discussed 
the list of proposed candidates for Honorary Degrees for 1969 and, 
in accord with accepted practice, the list is not made public. 
However, the members of the Board have now been informed of the 
names listed and acceptance is recommended. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the final list of Nominees for 

Honorary Degrees at Commencement, 1969 (Docu- 
ment T69-016) submitted by the Executive 
Committee; which document is marked CONFIDENTIAL 
and placed on file in the Office of the Secretary. 



3127 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis reported briefly that a meeting had been 
held October 14, 1968 in Boston to consider and report on the de- 
velopments in the selection of a permanent site for the University 
at Boston. No further report is expected to be made on this matter 
until the meeting scheduled for November 22, 1968. 

Chairman Haigis then read a commendatory citation received 
from the members, leaders and professional staff of the 4-H program 
in the state as a result of Trustee action in relation to relo- 
cating the 4-H Club Houses (Farley 4-H Club House and Bowditch 4-H 
Lodge) in response to their request. 

Chairman Haigis recommended the Trustees visit these re- 
located buildings to view the results of the work performed en- 
tirely by volunteers in the 4-H group. He lauded their spirit, 
their accomplishment and the evidence of their abilities, as well 
as the exemplary nature of the organization throughout the state. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the scroll tendered by the members 
of the 4-H program in the Commonwealth with 
an expression of sincere appreciation for 
their splendid spirit and achievements. 

Trustee Pumphret, as Chairman of the University Building 
Authority, was then invited to describe to the Trustees the study 
prepared for the proposed 1970 dormitory project. Copies of 
relevant documents were circulated to the members of the Board. 
These included: Estimates of Costs, Expenses and Required Revenue 
Twelfth Project (Document T69-018) ; Preamble and Resolution, as 
incorporated in these minutes; and a Contract for Financial 
Assistance (Document T69-019) , also an auxiliary sheet from the 
Office of the Treasurer entitled 1970 Residence Hall Project 
(Document T69-020) . 

Trustee Pumphret advised that the design has been 
enthusiastically accepted by the University Planning Committee and 
it is very attractive. The proposed Northeast dormitory complex 
will be located north of Eastman Lane in a wooded area behind the 
tennis courts next to the Women's Physical Education Building. It 
is proposed to have three eight-story buildings to house 1400 stu- 
dents by September, 1970. Instead of the usual single and double 
rooms along a corridor, the buildings will feature suite arrange- 
ments with eight students per suite. Each unit will be comprised 
of three double bedrooms, two single bedrooms, living room and 
bathroom. 

Chairman Pumphret stated the maximum cost of the project 
would be $10,350,000 as shown on the estimate supplied to the 
members of the Board. 

u j. „• • 



UM/Boston 
Site 



4-H 
Citation 



1970 

Dormitory 

Project 



Northeast 
Dormitory 
Complex 



3128 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



At the invitation of the Chairman, the Dean of Students 
responded to questions and told the Board the design by the archi- 
tects of the "cluster dorm" type accommodation was more responsive 
to student needs than anything previously constructed. He stated a] 
that this was the most thoroughly researched housing project ever 
undertaken at the University. The Dean stated that occupancy 
probably would be: one dormitory for graduate students, one for 
male undergraduates and the third for female undergraduates. Dean 
Field noted that the total square footage in these buildings will 
be less than with the conventional arrangement. He described it 
as an extremely adaptable plan, explaining that future needs could 
be accommodated, drawing attention to the flexibility possible in 
creating small classrooms or seminar rooms if the need arose from 
the suite areas. . . 



so 



After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : WHEREAS University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority (the "Authority") is authorized by 
Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended, 
(said Chapter 773 as amended being hereinafter 
referred to as the "Enabling Act") , among 
other things, to construct buildings and 
structures upon written request made by 
authority of the Trustees (the "Trustees") 
of the University of Massachusetts (the "Uni- 
versity") and upon determination by the 
Trustees that a project is designed primarily 
to provide facilities for, among other things, 
the housing, feeding, medical care or extra 
curricular use by University students, staff 
and dependents; 



BE IT RESOLVED that John W. Lederle, President 
of the University, be and he hereby is authorized 
in the name and on behalf of the Trustees to make 
a written request of the Authority that it under- 
take a project to provide housing facilities at 
the campus of the University in the towns of 
Amherst and Hadley for approximately 1,400 persons 
to be, occupied primarily by students at the Uni- 
versity and that the. undertaking by the Authority 
of new construction to provide such facilities and 
the provision and installation by the Authority 
with respect to or in said construction of fur- 
nishings, furniture, machinery, equipment and 
facilities and such related approaches, driveways, 
parking areas, planting and landscaping as may 
hereafter be approved by authority of the Trustees 
be and the same hereby is determined to be a 
project designed primarily for the housing of 
University students and staff or their dependents. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was then 

RESOLVED That the making of a Contract for 
Financial Assistance between The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts and University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 of the 
Acts of 1960 as amended and pertaining to the 
undertaking by the Authority of a project to pro- 
vide facilities to house not less than 1,400 per- 
sons and the doing by the Authority of certain other 
work as authorized by said Chapter as amended, and 
being the work requested by authority of the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts on October 26, 
1968, be and the same hereby is authorized; that 
the form of such Contract for Financial Assistance 
presented to this meeting and each term, condition 
and provision therein contained be and the same 
hereby . are approved; that said Trustees or a 
majority thereof be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to sign, acknowledge if deemed ad- 
visable and deliver a Contract for Financial 
Assistance in the form presented to this meeting 
and providing for a Maximum Cost of the Twelfth 
Project, as defined in said Contract, of Ten 
Million Three Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars 
($10,350,000) and to cause the common seal of 
said University and of said Trustees to be 
affixed thereto; and that the taking of such 
action by said Trustees shall be conclusive 
evidence that the same is hereby authorized 
and that the form of Contract for Financial 
Assistance so executed is as hereby authorized 
and approved. 

The Contract for Financial Assistance was then signed by 
a majority of the Trustees. 

President Lederle then submitted a listing of candidates 
for advanced degrees dated October 17, 1968, as recommended by the 
faculty. On motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the list of candidates for advanced 
degrees as set forth in Document T69-021, which 
document is attached hereto and made a part of 
these minutes. 

The President then supplied a listing of candidates for 
Bachelors degrees dated September 1, 1968 recommended by the 
faculty. Motion was made and seconded, and it was 



3L29 



Graduate 
Degrees 



3i30 



Undergraduate 
Degrees 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve the list of candidates for 

Bachelors degrees as set forth in Docu- 
ment T69-022, which document is attached 
hereto and made a part of these minutes. 

Personnel actions having been circulated (Documents 
T69-014, together with Supplement #1 and Classification of Position 
Titles, T69-015) , the President recommended approval and it was 
thereupon moved, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T69-014 together with 
Supplement #1, which documents are herewith 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
September 13, 1968 to October 25, 1968, as 
detailed in Document T69-014A, which document 
is herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the pro- 
fessional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as here- 
after determined by the Board of Trustees or 
under their authority. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 
Titles effective on and after September 1, 
1968, as detailed in Document T69-015, which 
document is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was then 



3131 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classifi- 
cation shall not be designated by any job 
group number or grade. 

Trustee Gordon questioned when the report would be forth- 
coming on the Future of Hotel and Restaurant Management. Provost 
Tippo stated this was presently under consideration by the faculty 
and is expected to be completed within a couple of months. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 



I 




Robert V. /McCartney 
Secretary, uWard of Trustees 




3132 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 22, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, Mass 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Chairman Boyden, Vice Chairman Healey, 
President Lederle; Trustees Crqce, 
Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, 
Greenblatt, Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret, 
Rowland, Troy, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Assistant 
Dean Gugin, Acting Dean Gagnon; UM/B 
Planning Officer O'Brien, Professor 
Fenton (UM/A Faculty Senate repre- 
sentative) ; Professor James Ryan (UM/B 
Chairman, Senate Executive Committee); 
Attorney Austin Broadhurst; Mr. George 
Benoit, President, Associate Alumni; 
Messrs. Alexander and Chapman of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates; Messrs. Clinchy 
and Flansburgh, Ford Foundation; Mr. 
Daniel Melley; Miss Coulter; Members of 
the Press; Mr. Stephen Berkowitz (Student 
representative of In-Town_site Coalition); 
Mr. Daniel Angert (representative, Students 
for Democratic Society); Professor Broderick, 
UM/B staff. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by the 
Chairman at 2:00 p.m. 

Chairman Boyden convened the meeting and asked Vice 
Chairman Healey to preside. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of the Board 
of Trustees held October 26, 1968. 

Vice Chairman Healey stated that the major item for con- 
sideration at this regular meeting of the Board of Trustees would 
be the location for the permanent site of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston. The following persons would be invited to 
address the Board: 



3L33 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor of UM/Boston 

The representative of the UM/B Faculty Committee Studying 

the Site Problem 
The student representation of the In-Town Site Coalition 

Mr. Healey called for the report of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. 

Chairman Haigis said that, over a period of three years, 
discussions had been held concerning the site for the University at 
Boston. He reviewed recent events including the fact that newly 
appointed Chancellor Broderick had requested a delay of thirty days 
in arriving at a decision. This request was granted in order to 
provide Dr. Broderick an opportunity to study the situation. 

Mr. Haigis reported that meetings were subsequently held 
on November 15 and 20, 1968 to consider a proposal submitted by the 
Chancellor and his committee. Since full and complete discussion 
was held (including chart displays of the Columbia Point Site) at 
the last regular meeting of the Board, nothing need now be added, 
Mr. Haigis said. He then briefly reviewed the proposal of the 
Chancellor and his committee. (Document T69-025) 

In the new proposal, three "space" areas, rather than a 
single site were designated: (1) Park Square; (2) South End; (3) 
Air rights over tunrpike. Subsequent growth would occur at other 
locations. It was suggested that modern, imaginative design would 
be utilized in developing multi-use structures. Thus, the flow of 
tax dollars to the city would not be reduced. This plan would also 
provide an entirely different educational philosophy and "confronta- 
tion," Chairman Haigis said. 

A letter form Cardinal Cushing also was introduced 
(Document T69-026) . In brief, the Cardinal stated, if the Uni- 
versity could put together a plan to locate space for 15,000 students 
in and near the South End, that the Archdiocese would make available 
to the University the Holy Cross Cathedral for ecumenical, religious 
and cultural purposes. ("If acceptable, the conditions under which 
it would be used can be studied on a later date.") 

The Cardinal also offered "to ask BRA to make these 
(three or four adjacent acres formerly promised to the Archdiocese 
for a gymnasium) available to you." 

After full exposition of the theory of the proposal, 
Chairman Haigis advised that greater detail would be supplied by 
the proponents of the plan when they addressed the Board during the 
meeting. 

Chairman Haigis emphasized that the present facilities of 
the University within the City of Boston at Park Square would 
remain in use, regardless of the ultimate site selection and would 
thus provide the desired urban milieu. 



Report of 
Committee 
on Buildings 
and Grounds 



UM-Boston 
Site 



3 134 



TRUSTEE 



Trustee 
Gordon' s 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Haigis announced that after discussion with faculty, 
students and consultants on a number of occasions; also, after con- 
sideration of more than fifty sites, as well as examination and 
weighing of new philosophies, (including the consideration that 
some aspects of multi-use structures would not be legally possible) 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds now recommends to the Board 
of Trustees that Columbia Point be selected as the permanent site 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 



Thereupon motion was made and seconded, 
held on the motion. 



Discussion was 



Trustee Gordon, as a member of the committee, expressed 
a dissenting view on the motion. He presented the reasons for his 
dissent and commented on the alternate proposal: a dispersed, 
linear University, threaded along transportation lines of the City 
of Boston. He acknowledged that Columbia Point is not an im- 
possible site, but noted that many have been concerned that it is 
"not a good site." He was also not convinced that the present 
alternatives are perfect; there are problems, he said, in the con- 
cept of a dispersed, linear university threaded throughout the 
transportation system. Some of these are legal problems, and there 
are other problems. This proposal to start at the South End and 
move toward the Park Square campus of the University is new and is 
just being put together. Some parts of this site were discussed at 
various times during the last three years, but the "total package" 
is so new that even as a dissenter to the motion to move the Uni- 
versity to Columbia Point, he felt that he should point out the 
problems. In his view, the problems were not insurmountable. 

The Columbia Point "negatives" have been discussed for 
years, Mr. Gordon continued. They involve sound from the airport, 
transit, or lack of transit, what must be put up in terms of a sky- 
bus; also land and engineering problems, including how high the 
buildings may go and the cost. Overriding all of these physical 
considerations is the educational philosophy of what an urban uni- 
versity might be all about in the latter half of the twentieth 
century. 

Very recently, the Ford Foundation Educational Facilities 
Laboratory produced a concept based on the current state of urban 
education. Officials at UM/Boston have had the benefit of working 
with some of the men from this laboratory. Study has been made on 
the immediate past in urban education as well as where it should be 
going. The study points to a distinct lack of relevance between 
what laymen have considered to be urban universities, built in the 
last 75 to 80 years in this country, and what form the urban uni- 
versity may take in the future. Example: The Ford Foundation talks 
about neighborhoods, not campuses. It points out that the boundarfes 
between campus and community are beginning to blur. A pioneering 
handful of institutions have accepted the need for a total physical 
commitment to the community. These institutions are beginning to 
plan neighborhoods rather than campuses. Many institutions are 
beginning to react to this latter day concept of modern urban 



3135 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

universities, e.g. the Tufts New England Medical Center, envisioned 
as a shared site or joint occupancy project in combindation with 
housing. In this concept, the school would be a community institu- 
tion and share its facilities with other agencies, serving adults as 
well as children. Trustee Gordon referred to Harvard and The Holyoke 
Center where the solution was to go to a joint occupancy scheme, not 
for economic reasons, but to help "stabilize"' Harvard Square. Mr. 
Gordon said he recognized there are certain legal problems as to 
whether a public institution can do that which Harvard or Tufts is 
doing, but these problems are not insurmountable. Time, however, 
is necessary to discuss these problems and prospects. This new, 
extended perimeter concept means breaking out of the "fortress con- 
cept" rejecting the physical boundaries that represent the Uni- 
versity as a closed system, Mr. Gordon continued. Urban colleges 
and universities thus represent only one element in the social and 
economic fabric of the cities. Although they cannot bring about the 
salvation of the cities, their resources of talent and knowledge 
can be brought to bear upon the cities' problems. Their physical 
presence, given effective planning and cooperation with government 
and the private sector, can "stand as a beacon to be followed by 
others whose goal is the survival of the cities and with them our 
urbanized society." 

These words may seem new and shocking, Trustee Gordon 
continued. The concepts that we have been wrestling with are new. 
"We live in a state and area where newness is not exactly cherished; 
we seem to go on precedent." 

"One of my reasons for dissenting is that while we can 
establish what could be a good to possibly a great university at 
Columbia Point, we are probably talking about something that may 
already be obsolete. I would be remiss if five to ten years from 
now, with a commitment of taxpayers dollars there, we find the 
Cleveland States (universities) and others of this country doing 
that which Boston and Massachusetts did not dare to do. Again, 
more time is necessary to study the problem, balancing that with the 
exigencies and needs of students who are demanding admission to a 
university that is already overburdened. 

"The offer of the Cardinal is both old and new. Cardinal 
Cushing's magnificent offer relates to something which the Ford 
Foundation is talking about; but it is old in the sense that this 
is where the urban universities in the 11th and 12th centuries began 
in Bologna. In his wisdom, he has reflected not only the past, but 
the present and perhaps the future. The fact that the offer in his 
letter does not spell out specifics as to acreage, it is a use offer 
which is a most interesting and gratifying offer for us to receive 
of which we should take cognizance." 

Trustee Gordon also commended the work of Chancellor 
Broderick in terms of "what he has been able to do as a relative 
stranger to the city, (within one short month) amassing not only the 
facts, but giving leadership to a concept which bodes well for the 
future of this institution." 



3 136 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gordon continued: "Now if this" Board does determine 
to go to Columbia Point, I would suggest there are certain burdens 
on political leaders now as well as those who will be political 
leaders later; for financial leaders of a city, for opinion 
formers of a city and state Co recognize that that which we are 
talking about is expensive; that in order to come within the con- 
cept of an urban university much more will have to be done to 
Columbia Point than is (being) done now. This will cost money in 
terms of environment; who will be our neighbors; what kind of an 
urban university will it be in terms of what will be surrounding 
us? It is one thing to have a commitment and a desire on behalf of 
political leaders today, but who can speak for future governors and 
future legislators? 

"Again, I, as a dissenter to this report do not "negate 
the possibility that Columbia Point can become a good, if not great 
urban university, but it will take a great deal more imagination an| 
money and interest on the part of people who show no interest in 
this university to make this a good- to-great urban university. It 
seemingly is easier to locate an Incinerator in the city of Boston 
than it is to locate an educational institution. We are more con- 
cerned with welfare than we are with education. Perhaps the 

suggested cure is to begin to spend more money for education to get 
rid of the welfare problem and get (people) out of welfare; but 
these are the battles today in a state that has the ninth highest 
per capita income with the fiftieth (lowest) amount in all the 
states expended on public higher education. I would hope that, 
regardless of the vote, the Chancellor would continue dialogue with 
the Cardinal for whatever use can be gleaned of present facilities 
in and around the (Holy Cross) cathedral; because, if Columbia 
Point is passed tonight, it will be years before there is a struc- 
ture there. 

"In summary, regardless of the vote, we will all pull to- 
gether; all of us on this Board who have wrestled with some 60 to 
70 meetings of one committee - one item of one agenda alone over 
the last couple of years. We will do our best, but I am using this 
platform to (express the) hope that the public leaders, political, 
civic, and others will recognize the problem that — whatever the 
decision is -- it is not a unanimous decision; that if it is 
Columbia Point, (this) is going to require that which has not been 
given us before. Support will be required in greater abundance 
than what the state and city have been willing to exhibit up to this 
point. If the suggested motion fails^ I would hope this Board 
might consider later a motion that would press forward with a study 
of Columbia Point, because there are certain questions within the 
Columbia Point problem which have not yet been fully ironed out. I 
am not sure that I, as an individual member of this Board, would 
want to totally vote today were there no other site, on accepting 
Columbia Point until they are ironed out. I would like to give 
(if this motion before us today is defeated) an opportunity to allow 
the Chancellor and perhaps the Ford Foundation and Educational 
Facilities Laboratory, an opportunity to study also the question 
contained in what a dispersed, linear University threaded along the 
main transportation system of the City of Boston may look like. 






3137 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"These would be my hopes, but again, if this fails, we 
will all pull together: those of us who are dissenting as well as 
those of us who have been for this and (we will) do the best we can 
in what we know - with the cooperation we need - can be built into 
a good urban university. But the burden is on the public leaders 
and the community, not on us." 

Trustee Lyons inquired whether it was considered that the 
Trustees had a firm offer for land on which they could build (in 
relation to Holy Cross Cathedral); also, whether there is any more 
reason to expect success now in getting the right to build over the 
turnpike than before; also, whether there is any concrete reasons 
to believe that the University may later be able to find these 
smaller areas within the city so that necessary expansion can be 
provided. In short, Mr. Lyons questioned whether Mr. Gordon feels 
there is something concrete about the alternatives. 

Trustee Gordon responded: 

"I think the Cardinal's letter answers the question (a) 
he gives the use of a Cathedral, in an ecumenical sense, obviously 
reserving portions of the Cathedral for church use, but allowing us 
to use it in various fashions (b) he is giving us right now, the use 
of Cathedral High School in off hours. I don't know when Cathedral 
High School ends its classes, but maybe it is at three o'clock, and 
we may have four o'clock classes (c) he indicates that if he ever 
found it impossible to operate the high school - and I cannot 
comment for the Cardinal and the operation of that high school - 
the University may purchase that piece of property which has a 
sizable amount of square footage that could be usable. There are 
adjacent properties which I believe are under discussion, but need 
further discussion. So, when you talk about concrete offers I think 
His Eminence has 'gone overboard' in giving us a great deal without 
a fee simple which we do not need for use of a cathedral; and a 
spelled out hope that we will have physical properties when certain 
things happen. Beyond that, we don't know. We need some more time 
to further this dialogue. 

"One other point: I don't know of any current dialogue 
with the Chairman of the Turnpike Authority. At various times there 
has been discussion with the Chairman on other sites and I can be 
corrected if I am wrong, but I am of the opinion that prior dis- 
cussion indicated that he was willing to cooperate in certain areas 
of air rights use over the turnpike. There are engineering problems 
in this current area, perhaps, yes; that he may have changed his 
mind, perhaps, yes; but certainly (the prospects are) interesting 
enough to ask for some time to further these dialogues, as I under- 
stand he has not been available for conference." 

Acting Chairman Healey offered Chancellor Broderick an 
opportunity to address the Board. 



3138 



TRUSTEE 

Chancellor 

Broderick's 

Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor stated that, at its last meeting, the 
Board had authorized him and the faculty of UM/Boston, working with 
the students, to study alternate possibilities to the Columbia 
Point site, the only site remaining under consideration. This 
group worked to assemble a program (see Document T69-025) which was 
presented to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds a week ago. 
The same proposal was submitted to Mayor White on Tuesday. It was 
again discussed with the Committee on Buildings and Grounds earlier 
this week. 



The Chancellor described the proposal as a tri-partite 



site: 



1. South End (north east of Holy Cross Cathedral) 

2. Turnpike (from Arlington Street to Washington 

Street 

3. Park Square 

This proposal included the possibility of threading the 
University through the city along the main spine of transportation 
lines, should the need for further expansion subsequently arise. 
He said this concept represents a compromise of two positions: 
(1) the traditional position that the University requires a campus, 
all parts of which are relatively contiguous; and, the philosophy 
of a (2) dispersed, linear University, threaded along the main 
transportation system. The plan submitted to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds a week ago was a compromise of these two 
elements because the faculty was not ready, on insuffient study, 
to make a full commitment to a linear University which is a 
decided departure from tradition. The problem, evident since the 
University's founding, continued to confront the group: that of 
finding an area of sufficient size to warrant the construction of 
a large university. Search has been conducted at various times for 
areas ranging from 200 acres, to 160 acres, to 125, and even down 
to a plot as small as 14 acres. The concept was always a search 
for a campus. The new concept is not for a campus, but for space 
within the city, shared with other groups and with the life of the 
city. Thus, the city itself becomes the campus. The Chancellor 
delineated the idea fully. He re-emphasized that the basic idea is 
space and not site; space and not campus. Each unit would be of 
substantial size: 2200 minimum, with expectations of 4400 for a 
norm - a size comparable to Williams and Amherst Colleges combined. 
The proposal advances a plan to thread along the transportation 
system, because the function of UM/Boston is to make public educa- 
tion available to those who would not, under other circumstances, 
be able to afford such an education. The University at Boston is 
to be a commuter University, serving the young people of Boston and 
surrounding communities. 

The Chancellor, with the aid of Messrs. Flansburgh and 
Clinchy, illustrated this concept with charts and maps. Pointed 
out was the present location of the buildings occupied by the Uni- 
versity. It was noted that, although not directly contiguous, they 
have served effectively. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor directed the Board's attention to expansion 
possibilities in the areas described. He noted what universities 
are doing elsewhere in the United States, in Toronto and in London. 
Once again he stressed that no attempt is being made to recreate a 
campus culture. The city is to be the campus, with full resources 
of the city available to the students and vice versa. It was 
pointed out that 75% of the students at UM/Boston work during the 
academic year, and that the center of jobs is in the city. 

Chancellor Broderick noted that the unique nature of the 
proposal renders comparison difficult. He reminded the meeting of 
Counsel Broadhurst's opinion that some of the techniques defined in 
the proposal are not constitutional. He held that some of the joint 
techniques suggested are in fact constitutional and suggested that, 
with additional time, a study in depth would produce the answers. 
He requested the Trustees to grant an extension of time up to the 
scheduled January 30, 1969 meeting of the Board, in order to prepare 
a major presentation with additional cooperation of the Educational 
Facilities Laboratory. He asked that any commitment to Columbia 
Point be withheld until January 30, 1969. He drew attention to the 
faculty vote taken the preceding evening, indicating that Columbia 
Point is unacceptable for the type of urban university described in 
the "new concept." He requested an opportunity to explore this 
"new, radical, dynamic, alternative." Students and alumni have 
indicated their views, the Chancellor observed, and unanimously also 
request a two-month delay to exhaust the possibilities for an urban 
University of Massachusetts/Boston utilizing core city space. 

Acting Chairman Healey then introduced Professor James 
Ryan, Chairman of the UM/Boston Faculty Senate Executive Committee. 

Professor Ryan stated that he had not adequately indicated 
the full strength of the faculty feeling about the matter under 
discussion when making previous presentations to the Board. He 
stated that 95-987, of the faculty feel the Columbia Point site is 
unacceptable. He said that a large margin of the faculty would feel 
the Board had done a disservice to the City of Boston if they should 
decide to vote for the Columbia Point site. Faculty sentiment on 
such a decision, Professor Ryan indicated, would reflect their feel 
ing that the choice was made on an economic or political short-range 
basis and without regard for the faculty's educational aspirations 
for the University. He expressed the hope that, no matter what the 
ultimate result, all segments of the University would "pull to- 
gether. " 

Vice Chairman Healey next introduced Mr. Stephen 
Berkowitz, UM/Boston student representative of the In-Town Site 
Coalition. 

Mr. Berkowitz said he was appalled that the Board of 
Trustees considered Columbia Point as a prime site for the future 
campus of the University. The concept of an urban university, as 



3139 



Professor 
James Ryan's 
Comments 



3 140 



Stephen 
Berkowitz ' 
Comments - 
UM/B student 
representative 
of the In-Town 
Site Coalition 



Trustee 

Gordon's 

Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

stated by others also, is a concept of reciprocality, he noted. 
Services and facilities are offered to students by the University, 
he said, but a municipal, urban university is envisioned for the 
people of greater Boston to include the adults now enrolled in even 
ing classes. 

Mr. Berkowitz expressed dissatisfaction with what he 
called the lack of consideration extended by politicians and by the 
Board to UM/Boston students, faculty and administration. These 
groups "have been heard, but not listened to," he said. 



Mr. Berkowitz stated that the In-Town Site Coalition 
would continue its efforts to secure an urban, municipal university 
within the core city. He stated that, in the event of a Columbia 
Point decision, all efforts would be concentrated on a defeat of 
this decision in the Legislature. Also, efforts would be made 
toward obtaining a separate Board of Trustees for the Boston campus 
A board composed of people from many diverse areas in greater 
Boston, excluding residents of western Massachusetts, would be 
sought "to insure interest in the special needs of the Boston campu^ . " 
A press release was circulated to the Trustees and others present 
which reflected this viewpoint. (see Document T69-025) 

Trustee Gordon was recognized. As a dissenter to the 
Columbia Point site, he said he wished to make some observations. 
First, that there has been an earnest attempt by the Board of 
Trustees to have a continuing dialogue with the faculty and students 
He disagreed with the statement that the students had "been 
listened to, but not heard." Secondly, he pointed out the danger 
inherent in the statement about the composition of the Board of 
Trustees. He suggested keeping the dialogue within the framework 
of the subject under discussion. 

Mr. Gordon stated his substantive agreement with Mr. 
Berkowitz' position on Columbia Point, but noted the need for 
clarification. He observed that the Trustees had been working for 
three to four years under adverse circumstances, with very little 
administrative help; operating in a crash program to establish the 
University in Boston. He noted the fact that UM/Boston was opened 
on the present site with only five months lead time. Department 
heads have been doing their own typing; the Board of Trustees has 
had 50 to 70 meetings of busy men on one issue alone: the Boston 
site problem. 

Mr. Gordon expressed the hope that the students would 
recognize that, while the Trustees were not perfect, the Board had, 
indeed, worked diligently on the problem and if the question is one 
of communication, effort will be made to improve. 

Trustee Greenblatt was recognized and addressed his 
remarks to clarification of the motion. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It would appear from the discussion, he said, that only 
one site is being considered, while the intent of the motion in his 
understanding, was to include both sites: Columbia Point and the 
downtown Boston site now occupied. Trustee Haigis responded that 
the present Park Square location was not included in the present 
motion. He noted that the University is already at Park Square and 
will remain there as previously established; therefore, the current 
motion deals only with the proposed Columbia Point site. 

Trustee Greenblatt observed that there would be some ex- 
pansion, then, in the Park Square site, but major expansion on the 
Columbia Point site, so that in terms of education at the Park 
Square site, the general philosophy of student immersion in the 
Boston picture would still be involved. He questioned whether, in 
fact, over a period of time, the University would not become even 
more interrelated with the Boston community as the population grew. 

In response, Chairman Haigis said that the possibilities 
of expansion of the City of Boston in the harbor area were part of 
the discussions held. Although merely in the discussion stage, it 
is apparent that the growth of the city in the quantitative sense 
would almost surely be southerly, and would include Columbia Point 
and the harbor islands. 

Vice Chairman Healey commented that the Board has always 
had the concept of retaining at least the Gas Company building and 
some peripheral properties for the maintenance of an adult education 
program at that location. He felt that there had been some indica- 
tion from the present city administration that they would be sympa- 
thetic to the maintenance of a segment of the general site, appro- 
priate for four to five thousand students. He expressed the hope 
that it would be possible to maintain this concept so that, in 
effect, whatever is the result with the Columbia Point site, there 
would be a viable in-town operation, slightly larger than the pre- 
sent one. Perhaps it will be possible to bring some of these other 
facilities into a more contiguous location. 

Trustee Healey noted that with reference to statement by 
Mr. Berkowitz that he (Berkowitz) would have preferred a private 
session with the Board of Trustees. The Board, however, felt it 
would be much more appropriate to meet publicly and afford the stu- 
dent group an opportunity to speak before the press, television and 
radio media, so that they would have full opportunity to expand 
their point of view. If the Board erred in meeting the request, it 
was entirely in good faith in an effort to permit an opportunity 
for the students to express their point of view in the widest possi- 
ble manner. 

Vice Chairman Healey next introduced Mr. Daniel Angert, 
representative of the Students for a Democratic Society. 



3141 



Trustee 
Greenblatt' s 
Comments 



Vice Chairman 
Healey 's 
Comments 



3142 



TRUSTEE 

Daniel 
Angert 1 s 
Comments - 
representative 
of Students 
for a 

Democratic 
Society 



President 
Lederle 's 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Angert announced that the statement he was about to 
read had been distributed to the members of the Board, to students 
at UM/Boston and to the residents of Columbia Point. It will also 
be distributed to residents of Dorchester and South Boston. (see 
Document T69-027) 

Mr. Angert stated that during the course of his presenta- 
tion he expected to make three points. He prefaced his remarks 
with a comment concerning the Park Square area within which the 
University is now located and where it is expected to remain. He 
stated it was the understanding of his group that this site was to 
become a Science Graduate School for UM/ Amherst. He based this 
assumption on the fact that science laboratories had been installed 
He quoted a statement of UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien which 
appeared in the student paper apprising the students of the im- 
provements and construction plans for these facilities. 

Vice Chairman Healey disclaimed this assertion and 
firmly stated this is not a matter that has been considered by the 
Board at any time. 



i 



(T69-027) 



Mr. Angert then read at length from the complete document 



Trustee Healey invited President Lederle to address him- 
self to the major issue, adding that any member of the Board who 
wished to comment should so indicate. 

President Lederle described the long and hard search for 
the very best site for an urban university. He expressed resent- 
ment for himself and on behalf of the Board to the insinuation that 
anyone considered voting in terms of being residents of Boston or 
Amherst or any other part of the Commonwealth. The President said 
the sole consideration has been to find the best available site. 
He said he assumed that the students, faculty and other interested 
persons would give credit to the Trustees for a thoughtful, careful 
and very deep analysis with the best consultants procurable. 

The President noted that a new Chancellor had arrived and 
wanted to play some part in the decision last month when it appeare 
that a decision had been made that Columbia Point was the best 
place to go. The Chancellor wanted an opportunity to see whether, 
in combination with the faculty, a closer in-town site could be 
found. As a result, the philosophy of multiple campuses was pro- 
posed. The President raised several points about this educational 
philosophy. If these campuses were within walking distance, 
relatively close together, it might be possible to produce a uni- 
versity, he said. However, when faculties, laboratories, libraries 
and other facilities are separated physically, it destroys the very 
concept of a university. 

The President suggested that confusion results because, 
in fact, what is being discussed by the Chancellor and the UM/ 
Boston faculty and students is urban education and not university 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

education. The Commonwealth has a system of public higher education 
There is a master plan of which Senator Harrington was one of the 
authors. It provides for a system of higher education, not just for 
a university. It provides for a state-wide, university system, for 
a state college system, a community college system, and for two 
technological institutes. To the University is given the role of 
the doctorate; also, the four-year education and master degree level 
The state colleges and the technological institutes have under- 
graduate education through the master's degree. The community 
colleges have the mandate for two-year education. If, then, you 
consider what the University is, it needs to have contiguity. It 
needs consolidation. It needs, basically, to be on a site where 
people can relate to each other. It needs a great library; it needs 
advance research equipment, nuclear reactors and so on. It gains 
strength from interdisciplinary relationships: relationships of 
faculty to each other. By its nature, the University tends to be- 
come a very large institution in which people gain from "proceeding 
in depth." The scattering envisioned in the new proposal would make 
such a concept very difficult to implement. It would not provide 
the community of scholars we have discussed. The President observed 
that Columbia University, located in the heart of the city of New 
York, has very little relation to the city. Physical location in 
proximity to the city is not the key, he said. What counts is the 
attitude of the students and theattitude of the faculty. Professors 
right in the heart of a city may, in fact, not use it as a labora- 
tory; students may not use it as a laboratory. 

The President pointed out there is not quite as sharp a 
dichotomy as presented. He emphasized that the University is, 
indeed, in Boston at Park Square. There is no present intention of 
giving up this location. 

In this Commonwealth, the President said, there is always 
a problem of combining public and private financing. A point is 
made that the new proposal will combine public and private financing 
Totally apart from considerations of the constitutionality or need 
for legislation is the fact of public resistance to purchase of 
bonds where public and private facilities are combined. This is a 
matter of concern. The President also pointed out that, instead of 
solving relations with the city, the concept of continuous and 
repeated movement to multiple sites aggravates our relations with 
the city. On the multiple campus basis, you go through continual 
travail, moving from one parcel to another. "In lieu of tax" prob- 
lems multiply for a city with existing serious tax problems. In- 
evitable attempts to enlarge sites would lead to continual troubles 
with neighbors every time the University needed to move. Obviously, 
some families would have to be dislocated; the economics of the 
situation would require this. Also, as additional sites were 
acquired the price would advance simply because the University was 
there and increased the property and land values. 



3L43 



3144 



TRUSTEE 



Vice Chairman 
Healey ' s 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President also pointed out the difficulty of running 
a University under the best of circumstances on a single campus. 
Administrative problems associated with a multiple site operation 
would be very difficult. Problems would develop in coordination 
and organization of campus units; also,, avoiding duplication of 
libraries, laboratories and other facilities. 

Re-analysis of the urban education vs University education 
concepts, the President said, would reveal that the role of the Uni 
versity is to be a great University for the people of Boston. It is 
the role of the community colleges located in various sections of 
the city to take many students on a two-year basis. State colleges 
might scatter around town because the nature of their program lends 
itself to being limited to about a four-year course. A University, 
however, has a much broader role - a role that calls for going into 
depth on the part of the faculty. Multiple campuses, therefore, 
may be located close to the heart of the city, but they do not 
supply the concommitant University need for internal interaction 
within the institution. An urban university needs to interact with 
the city, but it must also have an internal cohesion. It must be- 
come a community of scholars. It must acquire an identity as a 
university; an integrity. The President expressed the opinion that 
such a university could not be built under the "splintering" concept 

The multiple campus concept is an interesting one, the 
President continued, but this role can be filled more easily by 
state and community colleges. A University located at Columbia 
Point could have a close relationship to the city of Boston which 
is moving physically in that direction, and the University could 
well draw the city to it. 

Acting Chairman Healey invited other comments by members 
of the Board. 

, Professor Broderick of the English Department at UM/Boston 
a member of the In-Town Site Coalition, was recognized. He asked 
for definition of the role of Trustees who, he stated, "ignore stu 
dents, faculty, administration and alumni opinion on the crucial 
issue of not going to Columbia Point." 

Vice Chairman Healey stated that the Boston site problem 
has been carefully considered for a long, long time. The members 
of the Board have spent countless hours contemplating what was in- 
volved. He said he concurred with the educational philosophy ex- 
pressed by the President. Personally, he said, he found the concept 
of separated or segregated sites not acceptable. Considerable 
effort was made to secure a site closer to downtown Boston. How- 
ever, the Trustees felt their responsibility was to weigh not only 
the educational values, but also the values of the entire community 
as well as the economic values, and to make a judgment at some 
point. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Healey said, assuming as he does the educational 
philosophy of the President, and looking forward to the long range, 
the projections, of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, 
are for a college enrollment of 230,000 students in 1980, and there 
is an interim responsibility of the University to provide for under 
graduate education. There is no intention to avoid this, but there 
are other segments in tandem with us, that are part of the Common- 
wealth's master plan. It is hoped that eventually the major burden 
of the undergraduate programs could be conducted by other institu- 
tions, so that the University could provide education beyond the 
baccalaureate degree to meet the coming need. 

Mr. Healey expressed concern that demands be met for 
prime programs in graduate physics and chemistry, in the sciences 
generally, and in the bio-medical sciences. He affirmed the 
Trustees' concern for community relationships and their interest in 
the social sciences. He questioned who would provide the leader- 
ship in these fields, noting that funds are "drying up" in private 
education at the graduate level. The University must remain flexi- 
ble in order to provide for needs when the demands arise. "Unless 
the University assumes this role, students will be short changed 
for years and years to come," he said. He added that he could not 
conceive of this kind of role being supplied by the multiple site 
concept. It is necessary to have land on which it is possible to 
have the kind of interaction and interdisciplinary relationships 
already outlined. Although Columbia Point has problems, he con- 
tinued, it is the closest, largest piece of land adjacent to the 
city of Boston that is now available. It is the only one (avail- 
able) and if the University does not use it, assuredly someone 
else will. The southern section of the city, the city's administra 
tion advises, will be the center of the action in years to come. 
Mr. Healey referred to the Report of the Harbor Islands Commission 
and the recommendation of the Speaker that the State acquire a 
number of these islands. An MIT study group has outlined the po- 
tential of these islands for (1) the development of an $815 million 
complex, housing up to 100,000 people by linking the four islands 
to the mainland with causeways; (2) acquisition and development of 
the islands for recreation, at a cost of $45 million - a plan 
similar to that proposed by the Metropolitan Planning Council; and 
(3) alternative development of the islands for regional recreation, 
tourist and educational areas at a cost of $140 million. This, 
Mr. Healey said, is the kind of vision this Commonwealth needs, 
and the kind of vision that the Board needs. A broad view of the 
desired end result, in terms of the relationships with the other 
segments: the community college and state college systems, is re- 
quired. We are not operating in a vacuum in this situation, he 
said, we are operating in tandem. "We must keep our eyes on the 
stars for that is where they belong. Harvard has been in the state 
for 300 years and what is planned for this University today will be 
in this state for 300 years." 

Mr. Healey called attention to the adverse criticism of 
Route 128 when it was first built. He noted that today, less than 



3145 



3146 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

25 years later, it can be said that no single factor has been more 
important in the salvation of the economic health of this Common- 
wealth than the "golden road." 

Mr. Healey continued stating that there is a potential of 
100 acres available at Columbia Point. At some stage, it will be 
the center of the action for the Commonwealth. Ten additional acres 
can be acquired by filling the harbor on a planned basis. Time can 
be allowed for the area to settle. He pointed out the undesira- 
bility of a location such as that of Columbia University, for 
example, where every time additional space is needed, someone must 
be displaced. The University should be in a place at least 
reasonably close to public transportation, so that students can get 
into the city and interaction with the city will be a matter of 
individual choice. The degree of personal involvement should be a 
matter of individual motivation. 

The Vice Chairman stated that his remarks answered Pro- 
fessor Broderick's question as to how Trustees can resist the 
opinions of the faculty and student body. He recounted the long 
hours spent on the Boston site over a period of three years. He 
reminded the press that the members of the Board work completely 
without compensation; over the past 36 months had worked night and 
day to bring about the most desirable solution to this pressing 
problem. The moment of decision has been reached, he said, and he 
expressed his intent to cast his vote in support of the motion. 

Trustee Gordon stated his agreement with the fact that we 
should be forward- thinking in our location of a university that 
lives for centuries; also that thinking can best be accomplished by 
giving the Chancellor a little more time to study the dispersed 
linear university concept. This idea has been presented rather re- 
cently, and at the moment incompletely. He said we should not look 
back to the past. With all due deference to President Lederle, I 
suggest there is enough interest and excitement - both in the 
future of what the Ford Foundation suggests and in the concept of 
the use of the cathedral and (surrounding) area - to allow a little 
more time before this momentous decision is made. 

Trustee Emerson moved the question. 

Chancellor Broderick was recognized. He responded to the 
statements by President Lederle and Chairman Healey, stating that 
these arguments should be accorded careful consideration. Again, 
he requested an extension of time to prepare an elaborate study of 
the multiple site concept. Under such an extension, he said the 
UM/Boston group would be better prepared to accept the decision of 
the Board. He said there is "profound dissent" within the communi- 
ty now. He stressed that he was not requesting acceptance of the 
multi-campus concept, only that the Trustees allow time, until the 
end of January, 1969, to study further an idea which has had full 
consideration only since Tuesday afternoon, when the specific pro- 
posal then made to Mayor White proved unacceptable. Time to mass 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

resources with the help of the Ford Foundation Educational Facilities 
Laboratory and not a decision against Columbia Point is requested, 
the Chancellor said. 

There being no other discussion, the question of the motion 
of the Buildings and Grounds Committee was submitted. Trustee Gordon 
requested that the vote of the Board be recorded. Secretary McCartney 
thereupon called the names of each member of the Board and they 
responded as follows : 



YES 



Frank L. Boy den 
Edmund J. Croce 
Dennis M. Crowley 
Fred C. Emerson 
John W. Haigis, Jr. 

too 

Robert D. Gordon 



3147 



Joseph P. Healey 
Lorenzo D. Lambson 
Louis M. Lyons 
John J. Maginnis 
Calvin H. Plimpton 



George L. Pumphret 
Alfred L. Frechette 



Mrs . George Rowland 
John W. Lederle 
Milton Greenblatt 
Charles H. McNamara 



Frederick S. Troy 



It was thereby 

VOTED ; That Columbia Point be selected as the permanent 

site of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Vice Chairman Healey advised that, in accordance with the 
rules governing the Board of Trustees, votes of members cannot be 
recorded in absentia. He noted, however, that although Trustee 
Knowles ' vote cannot be legally counted, she has asked that it be 
made known she would vote for Columbia Point. 

The Secretary announced that the vote was fourteen yes and 
four nays. The Chair declared that the motion was carried. 

Chairman Healey then addressed the representatives of the 
student body present. He said that, though the Board had not acceded 
to the student wishes in this matter of site, he congratulated them 
on their decorum during the course of the meeting. He reminded them 
that they are free citizens and accordingly may proceed as they wish 
in expressing their point of view. He said they were involved 
citizens and expressed the hope they would continue to be involved. 
He again thanked them for the decorum shown. 

The representatives of the student body and faculty then 
left the meeting. 

The Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds next 
submitted votes recommended by the committee at the meeting held on 
November 15, 1968. He noted that the tight schedule under which the 
Medical School construction must proceed. Therefore, in order to 
assure conformance to this schedule, reaffirmation of the critical 
importance of completion not later than September 1, 1972, is requested. 



Vote on UM/Boston 
Site 



3148 



TRUSTEE 



NASA 



REWA Property 



Project 9 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To reaffirm to the Director of Building Construction, 
the architects, and the consultants, the critical 
importance of having the Medical Science Building 
completed and ready for use not later than September 1, 
1972. 

Chairman Haigis reviewed the commitment to place equipment 
for the NASA project on farm land owned by the University in South 
Deerfield. Discussion has been held with the Dean of the School of 
Engineering and the Dean of the College of Agriculture, and agreement 
reached. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To confirm the 1967 decision for the College of 

Agriculture to share the hillside pasture portion, 
of about 187 acres of the Rewa farm in South Deer- 
field to permit the NASA Project in the School of 
Engineering to locate thereon research equipment 
and facilities at various locations totaling 
approximately ten acres. 

Trustee Pumphret then submitted for consideration Manage- 
ment and Services Agreements for projects nine and ten, and a 
resolution authorizing the execution of guarantees under the con- 
tract for financial assistance dated November 1, 1968, pertaining to 
the twelfth project. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

RESOLVED ; That the making of a Management arid Services 

Agreement - Ninth Project between the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts, acting in 
the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 of 
the Acts of 1960, as amended, pertaining to a 
building to provide dining facilities for be- 
tween 900 to 1,000 persons at one sitting, 
being a building requested by authority of 
said Trustees on July 11, 1966 to be con- 
structed by the Authority as authorized by 
said Chapter 773, as amended, be and the same 
hereby is authorized ; that the form of such 
Management and Services Agreement - Ninth 
Project presented to this meeting and each 
term, condition and provision therein contained 
be and the same hereby are approved; that said 
Trustees or a majority thereof be and hereby 
are authorized, in the name and on behalf of 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to sign, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

acknowledge if deemed advisable and deliver 
a Management and Services Agreement in the 
form presented to this meeting and to cause 
the common seal of said University and of 
said Trustees to be affixed thereto; and 
that the taking of such action by said 
Trustees shall be conclusive evidence that 
the same is hereby authorized and that the 
form of Management and Services Agreement so 
executed is as hereby authorized and approved. 

It was further 



3L49 



RESOLVED : That the making of a Management and Services 
Agreement - Tenth Project between the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
acting in the name and on behalf of The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority pursuant 
to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended, 
pertaining to buildings to house between 800 
and 850 students, being buildings requested by 
authority of said Trustees on January 31, 1967 
to be constructed by the Authority as authorized 
by said Chapter 773, as amended, be and the same 
hereby is authorized; that the form of such 
Management and Services Agreement - Tenth 
Project presented to this meeting and each 
term, condition and provision therein contained 
be and the same hereby are approved; that said 
Trustees or a majority thereof be and hereby 
are authorized, in the name and on behalf of 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to sign, 
acknowledge if deemed advisable and deliver a 
Management and Services Agreement in the form 
presented to this meeting and to cause the 
common seal of said University and of said 
Tru stees to be affixed thereto; and that the 
taking of such action by said Trustees shall 
be conclusive evidence that the same is hereby 
authorized and that the form of Management and 
Services Agreement so executed is as hereby 
authorized and approved. 



Project 10 



It was also 



RESOLVED : That the chairman and the secretary of the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
and the treasurer of the University of Massa- 
chusetts acting as an officer of the Trustees 
thereof be and each such officer acting alone 
hereby is authorized, in the name and on be- 
half of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 



Project 12 



3150 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel 
Actions 



sign the form of guaranty provided in the 
Contract for Financial Assistance between 
said Commonwealth and University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority dated November 1, 
1968, on each note and bond issued by said 
Authority to finance the cost of the Twelfth 
Project referred to in said Contract or to 
refund any note or bond theretofore issued 
for such purposes. 

The Management and Services Agreements were thereupon 
circulated and signed by the Trustees present. 

Personnel actions having been circulated (T69-023, to- 
gether with Supplement #1 and T69-023A, Supplement #1) , the Presi- 
dent recommended approval and it was thereupon moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T69-023 together with 
Supplement #1 and T69-023A, Supplement #1, 
which documents are herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 



It was also 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
October 26, 1968 to November 21, 1968, as 
detailed in Document T69-023, which document 
is herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 



It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the pro- 
fessional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 





Rob 
Secreta 



J. McCartney 
Board of Trusl 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
December 20, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



3L51 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Emerson, Haigis, 
Healey, Lamb son, Maginnis, McNamara, 
Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, UM/B 
Planning Officer O'Brien; Professor 
John Fenton, UM/A Faculty Senate: 
Mr. Bernard Solomon, UM/Building 
Authority; Mr. Melley; Members of 
the Press; Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Boyden called the meeting 
to order at 2:30 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circu- 
lated and read, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees of November 22, 1968. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, President Lederle in- 
formed the Board of additional federal funds received for the 
library at Amherst. He announced the sum of $432,574 is in addi- 
tion to the two million dollars previously awarded. 

The President described the communications efforts being 
made concerning the University's current budget requests. Con- 
ferences have been held with Budget Director Shepard and the need 
for increased appropriations for another 1500 students at Amherst 
and a substantial number in Boston, has been fully explored. 

In the absence of Trustee Troy, the report of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy was given by Provost 
Tippo. He informed the Board of a proposal to establish a Depart- 
ment of Hotel and Restaurant Administration by separating this 
course of study from the Department of Food Science and Technology. 
These two areas of interest have evolved into entirely different 
academic disciplines over the years. A faculty study committee 
recommendation to this effect has the endorsement of the Dean of 
Agriculture and the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



3i52 



Department of 
Hotel and 
Restaurant 

TRUSTEE 

Administration 



Department of 
Anthropology- 



Tuition 
Waiver for 
Faculty 
Members of 
State Colleges 



Sabbatical 

Leave 

Recommendations 



Atlantic 
Studies 
Center 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Hotel and Restaurant Management 
program be established as a Department of 
Hotel and Restaurant Administration within 
the College of Agriculture, effective 
February 1, 1969. 

A proposal to create a Department of Anthropology separate 
from the Department of Sociology was submitted and recommended 
(Document T69-030) . After discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : That a separate Department of Anthropology 
be created, effective September 1, 1969. 

The Provost reminded the meeting that some time ago the 
Board of Trustees approved the waiver of tuition for community 
college faculty taking courses at the University. A recommendation 
is now made to extend this practice to state college faculty 
members. There was discussion and motion was made, seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to waive 
tuition, but not fees, for faculty members 
of the state colleges under the jurisdiction 
of the Massachusetts Board of State Colleges 
who take courses at the University of Massa- 
chusetts, provided that the faculty members 
are full-time before taking such courses 
and provided further that they return to 
full-time teaching in their state colleges 
after completion of course work. 

The annual applications for faculty sabbatical leaves 
were reviewed by the committee and recommended for approval by the 
Board. After comment and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the list of faculty members recommended 
for sabbatical leave for 1969-70 as shown on 
Document T69-032 be approved. 

Discussion was held on the University of Massachusetts 
Atlantic Studies program in Freiburg, Germany (Document T69-029) . 
The committee has asked that a full report be made by April, 1969. 
In the meantime the budget for 1969-70 received consideration and 
recommendation was made that it be authorized. On motion then made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the budget for the University of Massa- 
chusetts Atlantic Studies Center at Freiburg 
for 1969-70 be approved. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
reported that authorization had been received for a feasibility- 
study for the engineering laboratory building (180,000 gross square 
feet), at the Amherst campus. He also reported that the Worcester 
Medical School has received a grant of Federal funds toward the 
construction of the 400-bed teaching hospital for the Medical 
School. Chairman Haigis stated that the UM/Boston faculty is now 
working on the academic plan for the University in Boston and will 
move ahead in 1969. He asked Chancellor Broderick to further im- 
plement these comments, and it was said that the UM/Boston faculty 
planning committee has proceeded along the direction of bringing 
the program up to date. 

The lease of the Arlington Street building, as prepared 
by legal counsel, was circulated for Trustee signature. This 
document had received prior approval. 

Due to a conflict of meeting dates, Chairman Lyons sub- 
mitted the report of the Committee on Student Affairs in absentia. 
It was read by Trustee Emerson. The informal progress report made 
by Dean Field and others on various matters of student«faculty 
relations, was described, with particular emphasis on the House 
Visiting Policy. An evaluation of the new House rules was promised 
for early distribution to the Trustees. Generally, the plan was 
reported as going well. Treasurer Johnson supported this view, 
noting a significant reduction in vandalism. 

The President urged appreciation of the sensitivity of 
this area in external relations of the University. The House 
Councils were asked to apply adequate penalties to infractions of 
visiting and other House rules. Student spokesmen urged appreci- 
ation of the "pluses along with the minuses" in the situation. 
The report stated the new rules appear to have strengthened student 
relations and responsibility. 

Discussion was held on recent meetings with black stu- 
dents. The outcome was wholly salutary, indicating an improved 
climate of race relations. Reference was made to the faculty 
resolution commending the administration, faculty and students for 
the handling of this issue. Copies of the resolution were cir- 
culated, and in accord with suggestion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To incorporate within these minutes the 
resolution of the Faculty Senate dated 
November 21, 1968: 

I. The Faculty Senate commends the administration 
and participating faculty and students for deal- 
ing with the recent crisis in the relations of 
black students with the University in a manner 
sympathetic and open to the students and 
demonstrative of a genuine desire to make this 
campus hospitable to black students and capable 
of providing them with a quality university 
education; 



3L53 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 

Engineering 

Laboratory 

Building 

Medical 
School 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student 
Activities 

House 

Visiting 

Policy 



Faculty 

Senate 

Resolution 

re 
Black 
Students 



3154 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



II. The Faculty Senate commends the Afro-American 
Organization for bringing to the University's 
attention numerous community shortcomings and 
for displaying dignity and willingness to 
discuss, learn, and teach with good will, in 
their dealings with the administration; 



III. The Faculty Senate commends the vast pro- 
portion of students who evidently responded 
to a campus crisis with decency, calmness, 
and a renewed desire to scrutinize their 
own attitudes and behavior and the relations 
among races on this campus; 

IV. The Faculty Senate rejects as offensive any 
practice hostile to equal opportunity for 
black staff, professors, or students. It 
looks with sympathy upon efforts to teach 
truthfully and in many places on this campus 
black experience in America and elsewhere. 
It rejects practices based on the principle 
the black or white students cannot bear 
truthful teaching in all subjects, or that 
disciplines are incapable of being taught 
objectively by competent black or white 
professors to both black and white students. 
The University will gain from having more 
black professors, who should be here as first- 
class citizens, judged and appreciated, as 
black professors, currently are, by normal 
professional standards. 

V. The Faculty Senate affirms its confidence in 
resort to orderly procedure and civil language 
in the governing of the University, recognizing 
that in a complex society no individual or 
group can reasonably use as a test of the 
system that he should always get what he wants. 

Report of The report of the Trustee Committee on Finance was given 

Committee by Chairman Pumphret. He described the budget transfers necessary 
on Finance to assure proper operation of the University until the next fiscal 
year. He briefly reviewed the discussion of President Lederle and 
Chancellor Broderick relevant to the need for such transfers. 



Budget 
Transfers 
UM/ Bos ton 



VOTED : To approve budget transfers between subsidiary 
accounts (Account 1350-02) . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Account 1350-02 - Boston 

From: 01 Salaries, Permanent 
To: 02 Salaries, Temporary 



$245,000.00 
245,000.00 



From savings accrued from unfilled permanent positions, 
this transfer is needed to cover payroll requirements for 
positions filled on a temporary basis. 



From: 01 Salaries, Permanent 

To 03 Services j Non-Employees 



$ 22,000.00 
22,000.00 



To cover payroll for certain lecturers, et. employed 
on a part-time, temporary basis from funds saved on 
unfilled permanent positions. 



From: 16 Rentals 

To: 03 Services, Non-Employees 



$ 75,000.00 
75,000.00 



Funds for contractual services for custodial and 
security for newly leased space is available from unused 
rentals appropriated for this same space since some of 
the space was leased without these services furnished by 
the landlord. 



From: 15 Equipment 

To: 03 Services, Non-Employees 



$122,000.00 
122,000.00 



Lecturers, student labor, and other part-time 
services to support the educational program have been 
given priority in this tight budget year over items of 
equipment that are being temporarily deferred. 

Changes in the investment portfolio were reviewed with 
the University's investment counsellors, Standish, Ayer & Wood. 
It is planned to round out a $25,000 commitment in each investment 
item. After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the changes in 
orders in the University's investment portfolio 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 
as of December 4, 1968. 

Discussion was held on bank balances and the current 
interest rate on certificates of deposit. After consideration and 
on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 
to convert one million dollars of the sum on 
deposit with the First National Bank of Boston 
in the University variable interest account to 
a Certificate of Deposit (one year), current 
rate, 6%7„. 



3155 



Endowment 

Fund 

Portfolio 



Certificates 
of Deposit 



3156 



TRUSTEE 



Howard M. 
Lebow 
Memorial 
Fund 



Philip 
Sheinfield 
Scholarship 
Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Pumphret advised that a fund was established in 
memory of a former member of the music department, killed in an 
automobile accident. It is recommended that this be converted into 
an endowment fund. Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Howard M. Lebow Memorial be 
established as an Endowment Fund for 
the purpose of awarding annually one 
or more scholarships out of the income 
to graduate and undergraduate students 
in the Department of Music; awards shall 
be determined by the Chairman of the 
Music Department. Amount of the awards 
shall be determined each year with the 
proviso that any excess income shall be 
added to the principal. 

A second fund, received from Edward Winick, agent for the 
donors, accompanies a request that a scholarship fund be 
established in the name of 20-year old Philip Sheinfield who was 
killed in a crane accident. Business associates of the father have 
contributed toward this growing fund. The income is to be used as 
an award to a deserving male student in good standing at the Uni- 
versity at Amherst, and otherwise without restriction. Recommenda- 
tion is made that this fund be established as an endowment fund. 
Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Philip Sheinfield Scholarship 

fund be established as an Endowment Fund 
in accordance with the terms of the 
Trustee Agreement received from Edward 
Winick, Agent for the Donors, and that 
the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be 
authorized to execute said instrument on 
behalf of the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Pumphret briefly reviewed a proposal for an in- 
crease in the summer counseling fee from $15 to $30 for entering 
freshman students, and from six to fifteen dollars for transfer stU' 
dents. Dean Field explained to the committee that the fee includes 
room and board for two days; also, a program involving academic 
placement testing and counseling, academic and extra curricular 
orientation and pre-registration for first semester courses. The 
parents are provided a program on the last day which acquaints them 
with the University, its facilities, personnel and opportunities foi 
their children. After consideration and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To increase the Summer Counseling Fee to 

thirty dollars ($30.00) for entering fresh- 
man students and fifteen dollars ($15.00) 
for transfer students applying for admission 
to the University of Massachusetts - Amherst 
and to authorize the establishment of the 
Summer Counseling Trust Fund as a depository 
for said fees and to further authorize the 
director to operate the program as an 
auxiliary enterprise based upon a fiscal 
year budget beginning January 1, 1969. 

The laboratory fee for the Nursery School was discussed. 
Chairman Pumphret advised that this fee has been $25 and pays for 
special supplies and certain operating costs. Due to the increase 
in services and costs, the Dean of the School of Home Economics has 
recommended an increase to $50. After consideration and on motion 
made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : That effective with the fall semester 1969, 

the laboratory fee for the University Nursery 
School children shall be $50 a term. 

Chairman Pumphret reported a cash variance of $214.99 for 
the last fiscal year. He related this to the total sum of 120 
million dollars handled, and recommended that the amount be written 
off. The Treasurer was informally complimented on this record. 
Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the cash variances of the receiving 
tellers in the Treasurer's Office, in the 
amount of a shortage of $214.99 for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1968 be 
written off to the trust fund interest 
contingency account. 

The Building Authority, in response to a request to pro- 
vide housing for 1400 students, hopes to advertise for bids on the 
proposed cluster type dormitories at the end of January, 1969. 
Specifications are expected to be available on February 3, and the 
contract will be awarded on March 7, 1969. Chairman Pumphret stated 
that plans for the cluster arrangement have been carefully re- 
viewed by the University with excellent cooperation between the 
architect (Warnecke) and the administration. The Trustees have 
viewed the plans on several occasions. After comment and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifica- 
tions as presented and prepared by John C. 
Warnecke Associates and presented by the 
Building Authority for the 1970 dormitories, 
to house approximately 1400 students, sub- 
ject to minor correction of technical de- 
tails as approved by the Treasurer. 



3157 



Summer 

Counseling 

Fee - 

For Transfer 

Students and 

Freshman 

Students 



University 

Nursery 

School 

Laboratory 

Fee 



Cash 
Variances 



Cluster 
Dormitories 



3i58 



Faculty 

TR 

Senate 
Representative 



TRUSTEE 

Senate 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University- 
Relations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Boyden invited President Lederle to present the 
Presidential Agenda. 

The President introduced Professor John Fenton, the 
Faculty Senate representative of the University's Amherst campus, 
to the Board. He said that a colleague from the Boston campus will 
also be present at future meetings. 

Personnel actions were presented, copies of which had 
been supplied in advance of the meeting to the members of the Board 

After comment to conform the actions to an amendment 
approved preceding the Board meeting, motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T69-033, which docu- 
ment, as amended, is attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments without Tenure, for the period 
November 22, 1968 to December 19, 1968, as 
detailed in Document T69-033, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
with respect to professional personnel under 
provisions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or de- 
termined shall be as hereafter determined 
by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

Chairman Emerson reported on the meeting of the Committee 
on Government and University Relations held December 20, 1968. He 
noted that Governor Volpe had been appointed to the Cabinet of the 
President of the United States, and that the Lieutenant Governor of 
the Commonwealth would assume the duties of Governor. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Plans were outlined for a meeting with Governor Sargent 
to apprise him of the University's future plans and other matters 
of a more current nature. It is hoped to secure his continued in- 
terest and support. Chairman Emerson said the Dean of Administra- 
tion had outlined the University's legislative program and general 
support activities for the incoming sessions of the General Court. 
A Public Higher Education Day planned for January 15, will include 
general information service booths set up by each segment of the 
system in the public reading room of the State House. The purpose 
will be informational. Legislators and others will be informed on 
facts in which they have interest, such as admission procedures, 
forms, financial aid programs, housing and facilities. The booths 
will be staffed by experienced persons from the areas of admissions 
the Graduate School and scholarship aid. When the plans are nearer 
completion, the Board of Trustees will receive additional informa- 
tion. This project is being carried out as a cooperative effort 
with the Board of Higher Education. Chairman Emerson then asked 
Dean Redfern to review pending legislation. 

The list of pending University legislation having been 
supplied to the Board in advance of the meeting, Dean Redfern 
briefly reviewed the current status of the bills. He noted that 
the Board previously has taken votes to support the major sub- 
stantive bills (Medical School Salary Relief Bill; Bill to Establish 
a Dental School; Bill to Establish a Law School). These have also 
been approved previously by the Board of Higher Education. 

Dean Redfern commented favorably on the strong willing- 
ness expressed by all of the segments to work together to build a 
coordinated system of public higher education in the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Boyden wished everyone a "Merry Christmas." 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 



3159 





t J. McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



Public 
Higher 
Education 
Day 



Bills 



3160 



TRUSTEE 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Nominating 
Committee 



Remarks of 

Chairman 

Boyden 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 30, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, 
Gordon, Greenblatt, Haigis, Healey, 
Lambson, Knowles, Lyons, Maginnis, 
McNamara, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Sweig, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Governor's Representative Jostrom; 
Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Assistant 
Dean Gugin, Professor Zube, Planning 
Officer Littlefield; Miss Coulter. 
Professor Fenton, UM/A Faculty Senate 
Representative; Mr. D. Melley and 
members of the press. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, Chairman Boyden convened the meeting 
at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of the 
Board of Trustees of December 20, 1968. 

Chairman Boyden announced the appointment of the 
Nominating Committee: Chairman, Trustee Crowley 

Trustee Emerson 
Trustee Rowland 
Trustee Troy 

The Chairman then announced that he wished to remove 
himself from consideration for appointment as Chairman for another 
term. 

"This is a very difficult occasion for me," he said. 
"I am sure you understand it has been a privilege to work all these 
years with people such as you and others who have constituted the 
Board for the 25 years, I have served. I doubt if anywhere there 
have been greater problems. Yet, we have all enjoyed the privilege 
of building a great University. Twenty-five years is a long time. 
I knew this day would come some time. The Legislature has been 
wonderful. The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the 
House have been loyal friends and we have had great support from 
our own people, the late Philip Whitmore, Senator Ralph Mahar and 
others. The press has been courteous and helpful. It is 



3161 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

impossible for me to go beyond this point. There are only two 
words that are really meaningful on an occasion such as this: 
'Thank You. ' " 

The comments of the Chairman were followed by spontaneous 
applause and a standing ovation. President Lederle read a statement 
as follows: 

"The contribution of Frank L. Boyden as a member and 
chairman of this Board of Trustees spans the history 
of the University since it was a state college. He 
was first appointed by Governor Saltonstall in January 
of 1943. Except for a brief four-year period, he has 
served continuously ever since. 

"The changes that have taken place during his tenure 
of service to date, and particularly during his 
chairmanship, have, been truly fantastic. In 1942 — 
the last year before his appointment -- our enroll- 
ment was 1,410 and the annual state operating budget 
amounted only to $1,160,460. Before his first term 
as trustee had expired, we were no longer a State 
College, but a University. 

"In the early fifties, during his second term, the 
University waged a successful fight to gain a measure 
of autonomy through enactment of the so-called Freedom 
Bill. This was one of the truly great turning points 
toward quality growth. 

"By 1959, when he assumed the Acting Chairmanship, 
the University's enrollment stood at 6,131 and its 
budget at $9,532,629. 

"Under his leadership, there began a Great Decade of 
Progress. In 1962, the Autonomy Bill was passed. 
This Act was the single most important piece of 
legislation in our history. This was also the year 
of establishment of the Medical School. In 1964, 
a campus of the University of Massachusetts was 
authorized in Boston. 

"From that time to the present, the University of 
Massachusetts has moved upward in quality and 
quantity until now it is taking its place in the 
nation among institutions of the first rank. This 
year, as Mr. Boyden leaves the chair, we have an 
enrollment of 20,111 and the state appropriated 
operating budget amounts to $41,222,900. This is 
an almost unparalleled record of achievement in 
American higher education under the Board Chairman- 
ship of one man. 



President 
Lederle' s 
Statement 



3162 



TRUSTEE 



State College 
Board State- 
ment of 
Appreciation 
(tuition) 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"But beyond all of the accomplishments that show 
on the record, I would like to add in behalf of 
each Trustee a personal note of deep appreciation 
for the brand of leadership Mr. Boyden has given 
to the Board simply because of the kind of man he 
is: rich in experience and wisdom, gentle, fair- 
minded and broad-guaged. It is within the 
expression of these qualities that he has shaped 
our forward progress and, at the same time, en- 
deared himself to all of us: students, faculty, 
administrators and trustees alike. 

"After such a long and distinguished watch at 
the helm, we cannot fault him for relinquishing 
the rudder. Fortunately, he will still be aboard 
as a most highly valued member of the crew. And 
so, we express our deep and lasting gratitude not 
only for his achievements, but also for just being 
himself. 

"We are encouraged to know that his loyal and 
devoted service is not at an end. We look forward 
keenly to the great contributions he will make 
from this time forward as still new chapters are 
written in his record as one of America's greatest 
all-time figures on the educational scene." 

Chairman Boyden responded by thanking the President for 
his statement and referring to their mutual friendship. 

President Lederle, at the request of the Chairman of the 
Board of State Colleges, expressed their appreciation for the 
tuition advantage extended to the faculties of the State Colleges 
at the last meeting of the University's Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Boyden called for the report of the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Chairman Troy reported on the meeting held January 21, 
1969. He noted that, in accord with suggestion of a year ago, the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy reviewed only the pro- 
posed merit increments for the academic area this year. All the 
others were reviewed by the Executive Committee. As a result of 
rigorous review process, exercised by department, school and college 
personnel committees, 10% of the UM/ Amherst faculty are being 
recommended for increments. Boston figures show a similar dis- 
tribution, although they reflect the fact that a larger percent of 
the faculty is new; therefore, the total number eligible for an 
increment is somewhat less. 



3L63 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy referred to the Provost's analysis of the 
salary situation and its relation to the national AAUP rating list. 
The Amherst campus is described as BB, and Boston as BA, which rates 
as a "good" category, but not excellent. Overall, there has been 
improvement over previous years. The University of Massachusetts 
now ranks about 150th in the AAUP listing of universities by salary 
schedules. After comment and discussion, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the schedule of selective merit 
increments as detailed in Document T69-040, 
effective February 1, 1969. 

Discussion was held on promotions recommended at Amherst 
and Boston. Chairman Troy stated the Amherst listings resulted 
after many conferences which reduced the list to half. The com- 
mittee recommends approval. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : That the list of recommended promotions for 
faculty members of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst as shown on Document 
T69-041 be approved, effective February 1, 1969. 

The list of people recommended for promotion at UM/Boston 
was submitted for consideration. This list was the result of care- 
ful scrutiny and review, using similar evaluation policies to those 
applied on the Amherst campus. In accord with the recommendation of 
the committee, motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the list of recommended promotions for 
the faculty members of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston, as shown on Document 
T69-042 be approved, effective February 1, 1969. 

Chairman Troy submitted the name of Professor Alvan Ryan 
as an addition to the list of faculty recommended for sabbatical 
leave from UM/Boston for the next school year. Motion was made, 
seconded, and. it was 

VOTED : To grant sabbatical leave to Professor Alvan 
Ryan of the UM/Boston faculty for the next 
school year. 

In response to question, Provost Tippo noted once again the 
University's improvement over the last four or five years in the 
AAUP Salary Rating Scale. However, the national advance is b-TL a 
year. Amherst has moved up only 3.97o and Boston 3.57o. He concurred 
with Chairman Troy's assessment that the University is most notably 
deficient in the top grade level. He stated that most of the recruit 
ing is done at the assistant professor level. 



Selective 
Merit Incre- 
ments - 
Faculty Area 



Promotions 
UM/ Amherst 



Promotions 
UM/Boston 



Sabbatical 
Leave - 
Ryan, Alvan 



AAUP Ratings 
Amherst /Bos ton 



3164 



Selective 
Merit Incre- 
ments for 
Non-Academic 
Areas 



Transfers 
Between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts _ 
1350-38 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



North 

Pleasant 

Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey presented the report of the Executive 
Committee! He stated that the committee had received copies of 
the professional non-academic and finance management area merit 
increase proposals in advance of their meeting. These had been 
compiled with the same degree of care as those in the academic 
area. National comparisons of salary level ranges were made avail- 
able by the Treasurer. In addition, the committee looked at 
integration of the proposed new salaries with the general salary 
increase bill filed by the Governor. After due consideration, the 
Executive Committee recommended approval. Motion was thereupon 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the schedule of merit salary incre- 
ments for professional non-academic and 
financial management personnel as shown on 
Document T69-040. 

The Chairman referred to a proposed transfer between sub- 
sidiary accounts which would allow employment of an engineer and 
other techincal personnel for the Medical School. After explana- 
tion and comment, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That transfers between subsidiary accounts 
be authorized as follows: 

Account 1350-38 Medical School 

From: 0)1 salaries, permanent $15,000 
To: 02 salaries, temporary 15,000 

to permit the employment of a professional 
mechanical engineer and other temporary 
personnel to assist in the planning of the 
Medical School. Funds are available for 
this transfer. 

The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, as 
presented by Chairman Haigis, referred to the Analysis and Recommen- 
dations of the Joint Town -University Task Force with regard to the 
proposed closing of a section of North Pleasant Street, Amherst, 
where this streetbisects the campus. He asked Planning Officer 
Littlefield and Professor Zube (Chairman of the Joint Task Force) 
to describe the proposal. 

Professor Zube and Planning Officer Littlefield posted a 
map which illustrated the area under discussion. The conflict be- 
tween pedestrian and vehicular traffic on North Pleasant Street 
where this street passes through the University of Massachusetts 
was pointed out. The Task Force has evaluated alternate north and 
south connectors and circumferential routes around the University. 
The result of extensive conferences, involving also Town and Uni- 
versity planning consultants, is set out fully in Document T69-044, 
supplied to the members of the committee in advance of the meeting. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Task Force Chairman Zube responded to question. He 
stated that origin-destination studies had shown that more than 607« 
of all traffic on North Pleasant Street was University bound. He 
described and illustrated peripheral access to the University pro- 
posed in the new plan. If approved by the Board of Trustees, the 
Task Force plan will be presented to the Amherst Town meeting in 
February. 

Chairman Haigis advised that the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds recommends approval of the plan as presented. Motion 
was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the basic concept for the closing of 

North Pleasant Street and adoption of a total 
traffic circulation plans for the Amherst campus 
be approved as set forth in Document T69-044 . 

Treasurer Johnson reported on progress of the University 
at Boston on the Columbia Point site. Primarily, efforts are being 
extended toward the acquisition of the land. In addition, the UM/ 
Boston faculty are developing a master plan for the site. 

A fruitful meeting was held with Commissioners Dwight and 
Shepard and Mr. Chase of the BBC to work out arrangements to intro- 
duce into the Legislature appropriate legislation to facilitate 
acquisition of land at Columbia Point. The total dimension of 
Phase I for 5,000 students was explained in detail to the state 
officials. As a result, the University administration was requested 
to prepare the necessary legislation. This is now being prepared by 
the University's legal counsel, Attorney Broadhurst who has also met 
with Commissioner Shepard. 

At the invitation of Chairman Haigis, Dean Soutter 
reported on current matters pertinent to the Medical School at 
Worcester. He informed the Board that estimates for the cost of the 
Medical School were figured allowing for 5%7o annual escalation in 
construction costs. This figure has now risen to 10% according to 
H. A. Sloan Associates, a professional estimating firm in New York 
City. In view of this development, Governor Sargent has expressed 
interest in reviewing the whole Medical School plan. 

Dean Soutter expressed the hope that it would be possible 
to start breaking ground in June of 1969. Site work could be 
accomplished in July, in an effort to hold down escalation on this 
item. 

The Dean expressed concern about the budget submitted for 
the next fiscal year. He pointed out that two months after the 
effective date of the 1971 budget, the school will be opening. 
Dean Soutter stressed the need for faculty and other personnel to 
help plan the school so that it will be possible to proceed in an 
orderly fashion. He pointed out that, during the past five years 
since the University has been developing the school, out of 16 new 



3165 



T69-044 



UM/ Bos ton 

Columbia 

Point 



Medical 

School 

Report 



3 166 



Library 

Project 
Bids 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

medical schools in the United States, the University Medical School 
has received the least support. In spite of this, money has con- 
sistently been turned back to the Commonwealth each year. However, 
this can no longer be done for it is imperative that supplies and 
personnel be secured without delay. Some supplies take a year to 
acquire. 

A serious problem exists with the architects. When an 
approved project budget is exceeded by the actual cost, the State 
withdraws authority to proceed. Legislative action is now required 
so that design work may resume to insure opening in 1972. 

Dean Soutter explained that most medical schools open wit! 
small initial classes, usually around 16 -24 students. For example, 
Rutgers opened with 16 and has its third class of 16 now on campus. 
The figure 16 is a practical one as this number of students can be 
ideally accommodated in classrooms and laboratories under the 
supervision of one faculty member. Less than 16 is wasteful; more 
is too many. The Dean stated the Medical School will handle at 
least two classes in the Shaw Building: 16 first-year students, 
16 second-year students. 

The Medical School Salary Relief Bill, filed by Senator 
Conte of Worcester, was considered by the Joint Committee on Educa- 
tion on January 29, 1969. It is of utmost importance, Dean Soutter 
said, that this legislation be acted on favorably because of the 
necessity for recruiting faculty next year. He urged that appro- 
priate measures be taken to inform the General Court of the 
necessity for early approval. 

Treasurer Johnson announced that bids on the University 
Library had just been opened. The sum of $14,800,000 has been 
appropriated for this 28-story building. Three contractors bid on 
the construction and this does not include the fees or equipment. 
Bids ranged from $14,300,000 to approximately $15,190,000. The 
appropriation, accordingly, is short approximately $1,600,000. A 
cost estimate made last November came within the budget at that 
time. It is a great disappointment, the Treasurer said, that the 
project is now over the budget. He reminded the Board that a total 
of $2.5 million had been received from the Federal Government 
toward this project. The only alternative is to return to the 
Legislature for additional money. In the meantime, the contract 
cannot be awarded until approval is received from the Legislature. 
Bids hold for 30 days, and it is now hoped that approval will be 
expedited by the Legislature to avoid further escalation. 

There was discussion and question, with special reference 
to the escalation of the Medical School. In response, the 
Treasurer said it is contemplated that the wording in the present 
bill will authorize the architects to proceed with the design of 
the project, both the Medical School and teaching hospital. Later 
on there will be additional legislation to increase the appropri- 
ation. The contract is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of 
Building Construction which will make the award. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Emerson presented the report of the Committee on 
Government and University Relations. He requested Dean Redfern to 
review the status of major bills affecting the University, now 
before the Legislature. Dean Redfern said there are three bills of 
major concern now pending. 

1. The Medical School. Salary Relief Bill . The Committee 

was informed of the urgency in this matter 
because of the need to recruit faculty for 
the coming year. 

2. Law School . The Board has taken a favorable position 

on this. The Joint Committee on Education is 
expected to report this bill favorably. 

3. Dental School . The Committee was reminded of the 

Board of Trustees' previously stated position 
on this and that of the Board of Higher Edu- 
cation, i.e. if the Legislature and Governor 
direct establishment of a Dental School, they 
are willing to assume the responsibility. 

Joint Committee Chairman Fonseca indicated that the 
Senate Majority Leader has filed an alternate bill. This, in 
effect, proposes contract relations with private dental schools. 
No committee action is expected therefore pending consideration 
until possibly early March. 

Trustee Pumphret, Chairman of the Building Authority, in- 
formed the meeting that specifications for Project 12 would be 
ready on February 2, and that by March 6 it would be possible to 
determine whether this project can be moved forward. He expressed 
optimism that the project will be within the budget. 

Vice Chairman Healey commented on a $100,000 bequest to 
the University of which he had learned in his capacity as a member 
of the Trust Fund Committee of the Town of Arlington. He expressed 
satisfaction that the donor held the University in great esteem, 
and noted recipient scholars would benefit from her generosity. 

At the invitation of Chairman Boyden, President Lederle 
presented personnel actions which had been circulated in advance of 
the meeting. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions as 
detailed in Document T69-038, Supplement #1 and 
T69-038A, Supplement #1A, which documents and 
supplements are herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was also 



3167 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University 
Relations 

Bills 



Project 12 



Personnel 
Actions 



3168 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 

TRUSTEE 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period December 20, 1968 to January 29, 
1969 as detailed in Document T69-038, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be 

subject to the policies and procedures 
now in effect as subsequently amended, 
revised, added to or repealed by the 
Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 
fessional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended 
by Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, 
salary range and descriptive job specifi- 
cation for each position to which a member 
of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or 
determined shall be as hereafter determined 
by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 
Titles effective on and after February 2, 
1969, as detailed in Document T69-039, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shaJ.1 be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Robert/ J . u McCa^ctaey 
Secretary/ Board of Trusl 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 21, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, Chairman Healey, 
President Lederle; Trustees Croce, 
Crowley, Haigis, Lambson, Knowles, 
Maginnis, McNamara, Plimpton, Rowland, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Hospital Director John 
Stockwell, Acting Dean Gagnon, Dean 
Redfern, Mr. Morrell, Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by 
Chairman Boyden at 2:10 p.m. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees for January 30, 1969. 

The President read a communication from the Board of 
Trustees of State Colleges in which they extended an opportunity 
for waiver of tuition in the continuing education program. It was 
agreed the President would communicate the Board's acceptance with 
appreciation. 

President Lederle commented that the budget last year had 
included sums for special programs for disadvantaged students. A 
devoted black faculty group has recruited students for the program 
and worked toward its fulfillment. Funds are necessary to continue 
and expand this program. The Legislature appropriated $150,000 
last year; an additional $92,000 from the Ford Foundation was se- 
cured by the faculty group. The Student Senate is an unprecedented 
action appropriated $30,000 for this purpose. President Lederle 
said of the 125 disadvantaged black students enrolled, present esti 
mates indicate that ninety percent will continue with the program 
next year. This creditable record justified continuation and ex- 
pansion of the program. On the basis that the program, starting 
with $150,000 awarded by the Legislature last year, would continue 
at the same rate, approximately $600,000 would be needed when the 
present freshmen become seniors. The Amherst campus request was 
for $400,000 to cover an expanded recruitment program for 185 
rather than the current 125 freshmen. The Ford Foundation indi- 
cated, if the state increased its support, they would do likewise, 



3169 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 

Waiver of 
Tuition at 
State Colleges 



Disadvantaged 
Program 



3 i70 



Budget - 
Disadvantaged 
Student 
Program 



Committees 
of Board of 
Trustees for 
1969 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

possibly to a total of $1 million over a period of time. However, 
the Governor has not recommended the request. Instead he has cut 
the budget funds to $300,000. In addition, the Boston campus had 
requested $360,000 and was awarded nothing for their special pro- 
gram for disadvantaged students. If anything is to go to Boston 
it will have to come out of the $300,000 Amherst appropriation, 
which means funding for the new freshman class will be less than 
the $150,000 allotted last year. 

The President said it would cost $300,000 to carry on at 
the present level in Amherst. Additional financial backing is 
essential in order to expand this vital educational experience. He 
alluded to the much publicized costly welfare problem in the 
Commonwealth and said the best way to obviate this is by educating 
our youth. 

An effort will be made to get the Governor and the Legis- 
lature to recognize the need for the full $400,000 for Amherst and 
the $360,000 requested for Boston, to continue and advance the pro- 
gram for disadvantaged students. 

Retiring Chairman Boyden then addressed the meeting. He 
expressed appreciation for the loyal support and understanding of tble 
Press during the past years on all occasions when he has met with 
them. He made special reference to the importance and value of 
their support on issues of particular interest to the University. 

Trustee Crowley, as Chairman of the Nominating Committee 
composed of: Trustees Emerson, Rowland and Troy, submitted nomina- 
tions for Officers of the Board of Trustees, for Delegate to the 
Board of Higher Education and designated Committee assignments for 
the ensuing year. 



was 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



VOTED : To elect the following members of the Board 
of Trustees to the offices set opposite 
their names, for the ensuing year. 

Chairman Joseph P. Healey 

Honorary Chairman Frank L. Boyden 

Delegate to the Board of Higher Education Louis M. Lyons 

Two non-members of the Board were elected to the follow- 
ing offices: 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



Robert J. McCartney 
Kenneth W. Johnson 



follows : 



Committee assignments for the ensuing year are as 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



II 



Executive Committee 

Joseph P. Healey, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden, Honorary 

Chairman 
Fred C. Emerson 
John W. Haigis 



Louis M. Lyons 
George L. Pumphret 
Frederick S. Troy 



Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
Frederick S. Troy, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Milton Greenblatt 
John W. Haigis 
Lorenzo D. Lambson 
John J. Maginnis 



Calvin H. Plimpton 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Neil V. Sullivan 

Ad Hoc Medical-Edmund J. Croce 

Alfred L. Frechette 
Ad Hoc Agriculture - Charles 

McNamara 



I 



Committee on Finance 

George L. Pumphret, Chairman 
Alfred L. Frechette 
Robert D. Gordon 
Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Dennis M. Crowley 
Fred C. Emerson 
Robert D. Gordon 
Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles 
John J. Maginnis 



Lorenzo D. Lambson 

Martin Sweig 

Most Rev. Christopher J. Weldon 



George L. Pumphret 

Ad Hoc Medical - All doctors 
Ad Hoc Agriculture - Charles 

McNamara 
Ad Hoc Education - Neil V. 

Sullivan 



3L71 



Committee on Government and University Relations 

Fred C. Emerson, Chairman Dennis M. Crowley 
Frank L. Boyden Martin Sweig 

Edmund J. Croce Frederick S. Troy 



Committee on Student Activities 
Louis M. Lyons, Chairman 
Edmund J. Croce 
Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles 



Calvin H. Plimpton 
Charles H. McNamara 
Mrs. George Rowland 



I 



Chairman Crowley noted that it was the wish of 
the Board that the election of Dr. Boyden as 
Honorary Chairman be continued in future years. 

Chairman Crowley stated that a nomination for the Vice- 
Chairmanship would be withheld pending whether or not the committee 
is reconstituted for this purpose at the pleasure of the new 
Chairman. 

Dr. Boyden responded to his election to the office of 
Honorary Chairman by stating that he was deeply touched by the 
honor. He said it was the most remarkable experience of his life 



3172 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



Medical 
School - 
Dean Soutter's 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to have served for so many years with young men and young women of 
the Commonwealth. He counted it a privilege to have worked with 
the dedicated people appointed to the Board by successive Governors 

Referring to incoming Chairman Healey, Dr. Boyden said 
the University has been fortunate in having had for so many years 
one who has shared a tremendous part in the work of the University 
and community, and one to whom he personally owed much for his help 
and suggestions. He then presented the incoming Chairman with the 
gavel and extended best wishes along with the assurance of con- 
tinued support. 

Chairman Healey extended appreciation to the Board for 
their confidence, as evidenced by his election. He said he hoped 
that the tradition established by Dr. Boyden would be carried on. 

The new Chairman noted the difficulty of finding words 
that had not been used hundreds of times before to describe Dr. 
Boyden' s contributions. He said, "to employ a term used in the 
legal profession, he is truly ' sui generis'. If we look at the 
broad scope of American education at all levels, there is not 
another figure who can equal Frank Boyden' s contribution. We have 
been fortunate to have sat with him in our own councils on this 
Board. It is an experience we all treasure." 

Mr. Healey then assumed the chair. 

The report of the Executive Committee was given by Chair- 
man Healey. A meeting held February 14 in Boston was devoted to 
discussion of the escalation of costs of the Medical School. It 
was concluded that there is no indication of diminution of need for 
the school. In fact, the need is greater than ever. Examination 
was extended to cutting back to a two-year school; this was dis- 
missed without regret. The committee is convinced nothing is 
changed, except the cost. Costs will continue to rise unless fast 
action is initiated. In view of the demonstrated need, it now be- 
comes a service to the state to proceed full sail ahead to open the 
Medical School on schedule. The Chairman then invited the Dean of 
the Medical School to report to the meeting. 

Dean Soutter said: 

"Over the past decade, repeated national surveys have 
shown that the shortage of medical doctors is great and will increas 
steadily as the population enlarges, particularly in the older age 
group which needs twice as many services as do others. Reports by 
the American Medical Association and the Association of American 
Medical Colleges have concluded that, even if all existing schools 
expand, the demand for more doctors cannot be met unless many new 
schools are created. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"With a clear mandate from the people of Massachusetts 
as expressed by a vote of the Legislature and confirmed by the 
Governor, the University has proceeded to fulfill its commitment 
to the Commonwealth to produce more doctors. We have selected an 
ample site in Worcester; purchased a building in which the first 
classes can be taught until our main facilities can be built. We 
have appointed six faculty members, a hospital director and an 
administrator and other staff. We have drawn up extensive build- 
ing plans and are ready to start construction this summer. Teach- 
ing of the first class can begin next year. We have obtained 
promised federal participation of over $35,000,000, an amount 
awarded larger than that received by any other medical school in 
1968. H.E.W. officials have asked permission to copy our archi- 
tectural drawings as a model of a functional school for others to 
emulate. 

"The cost of our school is not excessive in comparison 
to others. Connecticut, which is over two years ahead of us and 
hence has had to deal with about 257 D less escalation, is paying 
$92,000,000 for a medical and dental school with fewer medical 
students and a hospital half the size of ours. For the same size 
class, Mt. Sinai will pay $107,000,000 for the school, but no 
hospital beds. Vermont, a small state nowhere as affluent as 
Massachusetts, pays $2.50 per year per capita for its school. The 
taxpayers of Massachusetts are now paying three cents per capita 
towards the medical education of Massachusetts residents out of 
state. However, out-of-state opportunities are closing to Massa- 
chusetts citizens as steady pressure mounts to accommodate an in- 
creasing number of native citizens. New Jersey is building two 
medical schools. Michigan has three. New York with eight private 
medical schools, has three state ones and is building a fourth. 
Incidentally, New York has the most favorable doctor-patient ratio 
in the country. California has five state schools in various stage 
of construction and even Nevada is going to build a two-year school 
Of the $124,000,000 which is now required to build the Massachu- 
setts school and hospital, we have over $35,000,000 already 
promised by the federal government. 

"The state has voted to date a total of $23,950,000 of 
state funds to acquire the land and temporary building and to build 
the medical science facilities. Thus, approximately $59,000,000 
in funding is already available for the project. The sum we now 
need to meet escalation of costs is $65,000,000 and this amount 
can be spread for appropriation purposes over four separate fiscal 
years which certainly appears to be a very manageable arrangment. 

"We point out again that, only one year ago, when cost 
estimates were provided to us by the architects for filing our 
application for federal funds, we had a project in preliminary de- 
sigh that the architects assured us was within the costs as 
authorized by the Legislature. Last December (1968) we were 
shocked to learn from the architects and their cost consultants 



3173 



174 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that inflation in the construction field has now increased to 10% 
per year. Projecting the costs to mid-point of construction as is 
customary means that the overall project will escalate 25% over the 
original estimates, providing that construction can start this 
summer (1969) . 

"The demand by Massachusetts residents for places in 
medical schools is steadily increasing. Most Massachusetts students 
have to go out of state in, order to get a medical education. Many 
qualified students each year never get into any school. To remedy 
this situation and provide the medical doctors that Massachusetts 
so desperately needs, the Legislature has approved a medical school 
for 400 medical students, 200 other medical related students and a 
400-bed hospital. But our project is now completely stalled. We 
were promised a month ago that a hard look would be taken at the 
school, but no hard look has been taken. The State Bureau of 
Buildings and Construction had no alternative but to withdraw 
authorization for the architects to proceed as of December 12, 1968 
since the project cost exceeds the legislative authorization. Yet, 
every additional month added to the project increases the cost by 
about a million dollars. The delay is costing over $30,000 a day. 
We need authorization for the architects to. proceed immediately be- 
cause we stand- to lose $13,800,000 of federal participation in the 
first phase of the project if construction has not started by 
September. 

"Opening of the school in 1970 and moving into our perma- 
nent buildings in 1972 are also in serious jeopardy because of de- 
lay. Action to get this project moving again is needed and needed 
now. The University is ready and willing to proceed at the earliest 
possible moment." 

Dean Soutter refuted a recent story in a Boston newspaper 
indicating that Deans of other New England Medical Schools do not 
favor the University of Massachusetts facility. Through his own 
contact with the Deans quoted, he has established that they agree 
that a need exists for the state medical school. He noted that two 
of the state's three private medical schools (Tufts and Boston 
University) were experiencing financial difficulties and should ex- 
pand to meet the health needs of the Commonwealth. He suggested 
they seek funds, as private schools, from the federal government. 

Boston University received $325,000 last year from this 
source, Dean Soutter reported. He opposed the suggestion that state 
aid in expansion of private schools for the Commonwealth would be 
less expensive than building the University Medical School 

"It would take five or six years of planning for the pri- 
vate schools to do this, and the escalation factor would skyrocket,' 
Dean Soutter said, "whereas the University Medical School is ready 
to move now. It is urgent that House 4606, now before the Ways and 
Means Committee, be passed as soon as possible in order to get the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



architects back to work on the medical school," the Dean concluded, 

Chairman Healey pointed out that all of the reports of 
study groups preceding establishment of the Medical School had 
emphasized the need for an additional school in the projections for 
the Commonwealth. Some of the things the Executive Committee con- 
sidered were how to implement the information in the report and re- 
assert the need. The pending bill H.4606 simply provides authoriza 
tion for the architects to continue. It does not deal with 
financial problems. This matter must be taken up with the Governor 
and Legislature. 

Governor Sargent has said he would like to take a hard 
look at the Medical School before further action is taken. Presi- 
dent Lederle commented that, with escalation at $33,000 a day, any 
undue delay will cost the state a great deal of money. 

Trustee Croce noted that a site and a building have 
already been acquired for the school. In fact the University is 
ready to proceed with faculty enrollment now and student enrollment 
in about a year. 

Chairman Healey suggested appointing a committee to work 
with the Dean of the Medical School and his administrative staff 
to arrange a conference with the officials in the legislative and 
executive departments of the Commonwealth. The urgency of the 
matter and need for rapid action was stressed. After further 
discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Chairman be authorized to appoint 
a committee to work with the Legislature 
and the Governor on the matter of the Medi- 
cal School. 

The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was 
made by Chairman Haigis. He reviewed the subject of a meeting held 
February 12, 1969. He said a serious problem of air pollution has 
arisen in connection with the high rise buildings in the center of 
campus, including the new library. Smokestacks from the power 
plant are so located that effluent may enter the air intake of the 
Library, creating a health hazard. The issue was described as 
whether to construct a new 350 foot stack for the power plant in th£ 
rapidly congesting "Gulch" area or rebuild the entire plant on the 
Tillson Farm property. 

Chairman Haigis informed the Board of a request from the 
Associate Alumni that a plaque be placed on the Whitmore Administra 
tion Building, indicating this was the site of the original Alumni 
Field. The Alumni will assume the cost. Motion was made, seconded 
and it was 



3175 



Medical 
School 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings & 
Grounds 



Plaque - 
Whitmore 
(Alumni Field) 



3176 



TRUSTEE 



Undergraduate 
Degrees 



Graduate 
Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That placement of a, plaque on Whitmore 

Administration Building by the Associate 
Alumni ,_ indicating that this was the site 
of the original Alumni Field, be approved. 

President Lederle stated that a listing of degrees to be 
awarded in February, including changes, had been circulated to the 
Board in advance of the meeting.. He noted that these lists were 
voted by the faculty, and were, subject to further changes. Motion 
was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the undergraduate 
degrees awarded as of Eebruary 1, 1969, 
as detailed in Document T69-050, subject 
to appropriate changes and amendments by 
the Office of the Registrar, which docu- 
ment is attached hereto and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was also _ , 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the graduate de- 
grees awarded as of February 1, 1969, as 
detailed in Document T69-051, which docu- 
ment is attached hereto and made a part 
of these minutes. 

The President submitted for consideration the personnel 
actions which had been circulated to the members of the Board in 
advance of the meeting. 



was 



After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T69-045 and T69-045A, 
which documents are herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes..; 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure for the period 
January 30, 1969 to February 20, 1969, as 
detailed in Document T69-045A, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was further 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with 
respect to professional personnel under pro- 
visions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as 
amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classifi- 
cation, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or determined 
shall be as hereafter determined by the Board 
of Trustees or under their authority. 

The Dean of Administration reported on the Deficiency 
Capital Outlay Bill, H.4606. He said the time element is critical. 
With reference to the Library, the lowest bid is $2 million over 
estimates and bids are good only for 30 days (or until March 1) . 
He expressed the hope that the Bill will proceed rapidly through 
the General Court in order to allow the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction to take action. 

With reference to Tobin Hall, a request has been filed 
to restore the amount cut from this appropriation, so that the 
project can get underway this summer. 

As previously noted, the Bill also contains provision 
which would authorize the architects for the Medical School to re- 
sume work. In addition, H.4606 provides for a change in the word- 
ing on authorization of the Infirmary addition, to allow it to be 
developed in phases. Thus, the present Infirmary can be continued 
in use while the addition is in process of construction. 

Secretary McCartney announced that the Student Senate, on 
behalf of the student body, wishes to make a presentation to Dr. 
Boyden. He then introduced Student Senate President Paul Silverman 
to Dr. Boyden and to the meeting. 

Senate President Silverman presented an inscribed^, framed 
citation, which commended Dr. Boyden for many years of devoted 
service to the University and to the Commonwealth. 

Dr. Boyden was deeply touched and rather than make a 
speech, referred to Ulysses' return from war when he gathered to- 
gether with those who had served with him. He said this speech is 
a wonderful thing and commended it to the students. He suggested 
they look it up in their home libraries. He expressed his great 
appreciation for the thoughtfulness of the student body. 



3L77 



The meeting was adjourned at/2 





J. McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



Deficiency 
Capital 
Outlay 
Bill 

Library 



Medical 
School - 
architects 

Infirmary 



Presentation 
to Dr. Boyden 

by Student 
Senate 



178 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

March 14, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Gardner Room, Sheraton-Boston 

Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Croce, Crowley, 
Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, Haigis, 
Lamb son, Knowles, Lyons, Maginnis, 
McNamara, Plimpton, Rowland, Troy, 
Sweig; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 

PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern; Acting 
Dean Gagnon, Dr. Saunders, UM/B 
Planning Officer O'Brien, UM/B Faculty 
Senate Representative Ryan; Miss Coulter, 
Mr. Melley and members of the Press. 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Dr. Boyden 
Presentation 

Resignation of 
Dean of 
College of 
Arts & Sciences 



Acting Dean 
(Dr. Shapiro) 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by 
Chairman Healey at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the prior meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees for February 21, 1969. 

Chairman Healey, on behalf of the Board, as an evidence 
of their esteem, then presented an inscribed gavel and citation 
to the former Chairman of the Board, Dr. Frank Boyden. 

Dr. Boyden expressed deep appreciation and read an ex- 
cerpt from Tennyson's "Ulysses" appropriate for the occasion. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was given by Chairman Troy. He advised that Dean Hunsberger 
of the College of Arts and Sciences had resigned. The administra- 
tion has moved promptly to select an Acting Dean until a permanent 
Dean can be appointed. After considerable screening, Dr. Seymour 
Shapiro, head of the department of botany, has been recommended to 
serve as Acting Dean. Chairman Troy stated the Provost was in- 
timately involved in the search for the Acting Dean and invited him 
to speak further on the subject. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo said the former Dean I. M. Hunsberger was 
a man of very high standards, an effective recruiter, an extremely 
hard worker, who would go down in the history of the school for his 
major contributions. He then described the many consultations held 
with every department head in the College of Arts and Sciences as 
well as with student and faculty committees, before coming to a de- 
cision for Acting Dean. The overwhelming support was for Dr. 
Shapiro. The Provost briefly outlined Dr. Shapiro's educational 
background, attainments and qualifications. Trustee Rowland ex- 
pressed her endorsement of the selection, noting that, during the 
SWAP conference last fall, she had opportunity to observe the 
calibre of this man and the regard and esteem in which he was held 
by students and others alike. It was then 

VOTED : That the Trustees appoint Professor 

Seymour Shapiro as Acting Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Treasurer reported that three bids had been re- 
ceived for the construction of the "1970 Dorms," designed by the 
John Carl Warnecke Associates, to house 1400 students. Daniel 
O'Connell and Sons and Aberthaw Construction are successful low 
bidders. The Treasurer commented on student participation in 
discussion with the designers throughout the planning phase for 
these dormitories. This has led to constructive and beneficial 
result as reflected in the decision to construct suite-type units. 
There was discussion on the feasibility of developing within the 
student community greater variety of facilities, including con- 
sideration of off-campus housing. The President felt that private 
construction of suitable off -campus housing should be encouraged. 
He commented that the Student Senate had passed a resolution to 
put an end to any further construction of single room, dormitory 
type accommodations. 

The trend to off-campus apartment living was examined. 
President Lederle stated that, although it was held to be more 
economical (since several people shared the expenses of such 
accommodations) fundamentally the students wish to be independent. 
It is hoped that the Treasurer will examine the SCOPE program on 
the West Coast later this year in order to determine the possi- 
bilities inherent for the University in this independently 
organized housing plan. 

Consideration was extended to the question of whether the 
neighboring communities to Amherst would object to an influx of 
student housing. Dr. Boyden said the small country towns welcome 
the addition of young people. 

President Lederle submitted personnel actions, Documents 
T69-052, together with Supplement #1 and Supplement #IA, which had 
been circulated in advance of the meeting. Approval was 
recommended. 



3179 



Project 12 
1970 

Dormitories 



3180 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 



Personnel 
Actions 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Personnel 

Actions as detailed in Document T69-052 
together with Supplements #1 and #1A, 
which documents are herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 



Presidential 
Appointments 



It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period February 21, 1969 to March 13, 1969 
as detailed in Document T69-052A, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was further 



VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
with respect to professional personnel under 
provisions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or de- 
termined shall be as hereafter determined 
by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

Chairman Healey introduced to the Board Professor John 
Ryan, the duly designated representative of the Faculty Senate of 
the University's Boston campus. 

In view of the fact that the document, " Projections and 
Predictions for the University of Massachusetts, 1969-1980 " will be 
dispatched to the members of the Board on March 17, (and subse- 
quently to the Board of Higher Education prior to April 15) 
discussion was held on advancing the date of the next meeting of 
the Board of Trustees to April 9, in order to afford opportunity 
for discussion. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 



VOTED : That the previously scheduled meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts be advanced from April 23 
to April 9, 1969. 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey reminded the Board that this meeting will 
be held in Worcester. Notice of time of meeting, a map showing the 
best routes to the Shaw Building and the agenda will be forwarded 
to the Trustees shortly by Secretary McCartney. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 




Robert J./McCartne 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




3181 



3182 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 

President 1 s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
April 30, 1969, 2:00 p.m., U of M Medical School, Worcester, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees- Chandler, Croce, Crowley, 
Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, Haigis , 
Knowles, Lyons, Maginnis, Plimpton, 
Pumphret, Sweig, Troy, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Chancellor Broderick, Dean Soutter, 
Dean Redfern, Associate Provost Allen, 
Deans D. Allen, Field, Gentile, Maher, 
McGuirk, Picha, Shapiro, Smith, 
Spielman; Associate Dean Marcus; Act- 
ing Director of Libraries Clay; Hospital 
Director Stockwell, Dr. S. L. Clark, 
UM/W; Professor Howards, UM/A; Budget 
Officer Morrell; Dr. Burn, Director of 
Foreign Programs; Professor James Ryan, 
UM/B; Robert Leo, Representative from 
Commission on Administration; Mr. Puglia, 
Student Representative from UM/B; Paul 
Silverman, Retiring President of the 
Student Senate; Cynthia Olken, Vice- 
President of the Student Senate; David 
Stevens of Humor Magazine; Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 
2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been complied 
with, and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being present and act- 
ing throughout, the meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulatec 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To dispense with the reading, and approve 
the minutes of the meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of March 14, 1969. 

The President reported that a ground breaking ceremony 
had been held at the site of the new 28-story library in Amherst. 
He said this building will be one of the finest in America. He ex- 
pressed hope that the $1,000,000 requested for books for the 
library in the Operating Budget, but not funded, would be forth- 
coming in the capital outlay appropriation. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President expressed disappointment with the 
Governor's budget recommendation which is in the House at this 
time. The Legislature cannot be said to have cut the budget, he 
stated. That body is in the process of listening to requests of 
all the agencies for funds. 

The University staff has developed comments on the 
Governor's budget recommendation, House #1 (Document T69-063) . 
Copies of this have been supplied to the Board of Trustees. Sound 
recommendations, designed to give the Commonwealth the kind of 
quality public University the people require were made originally. 
The absolute minimum restorations are set forth in Document T69- 
063. The minimum need for Amherst is $3,397,900; for Boston, 
$649,382; and for the Medical School, $881,975. The latter sum is 
required if the Medical School is to open in the fall of 1970. 

Strong representations of need were made to the Executive 
Office in late fall and in December. The President said, "we 
dealt with one Governor then, and deal now with a different 
Governor." Every effort is being made to get the Governor to pro- 
vide supplemental or deficiency appropriations for University needs 
At the same time, appeals are being made to the Legislature for the 
kind of support needed. 

One of the problems higher education faces is the need 
for expansion. It is impossible to add 1500 students each year, 
build a new campus in Boston, and add a medical school without 
added cost. The University has not generated these problems, the 
President stated. We are merely indicating what it takes to solve 
the problem. The Commonwealth will be disadvantaged if the current 
level of support, not only for the University of Massachusetts 
system, but for the State Colleges, Community Colleges and the 
Technological Institutes does not move up. 

The President noted that, in the last ten years, there ha 
been a 67» reduction of Massachusetts students enrolled in the 
private sector. This increases the load on the public institutions 
The President expressed regret the other segments of the higher 
education system also are not getting adequate support. He ex- 
pressed the hope that a united campaign for support would bring 
this serious situation to the attention of the new Governor and 
also encourage the support of the Legislature for a substantial 
restoration of funds. 

With reference to the Medical School, the President 
pointed out the level of funding provided will not enable the 
School to open in the fall of 1970. So far, it has operated with 
consultants and a minimum of full-time staff. 

In order to open in the fall of 1970, it is necessary to 
have full-time faculty planning curriculum, admissions officers, 
and a great deal of preparatory work actively going on during this 
coming fiscal year. Actually the Medical School recommendation in 



3183 



FY 1970 
Budget 



3 184 



Disadvantaged 

Student 

Program 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

House #1 is at a lower level than last year's appropriation which 
was not the year prior to going into active operation. The effect, 
among other things, is to endanger accreditation. No other Medical 
School in the nation, faced with a 1970 deadline for opening, has 
been faced with such a paucity of support, Dean Soutter concluded. 

The President again emphasized that the Legislature has 
not cut the budget. The cut has occurred at the Executive level. 
The possibility of further consideration by the Governor has not 
been eliminated, but the pressure of time and deadlines are great. 
A further effect is that the University is held responsible for 
trying to secure Federal financial support and for trying to recruit 
top quality faculty under circumstances where the question is "Does 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts really want a Medical School?" 
President Lederle expressed confidence that it does; the recent vote 
of additional capital funds by the Legislature is an indication of 
this. However, word from the Governor indicating his support is 
urgently sought. 

President Lederle next spoke on the funding of the Dis- 
advantaged Student Program. The sum of $400,000 was requested in 
the budget for the Amherst campus. In the past year, $150,000 was 
appropriated, and plus approximately $90,000 from the Ford Founda- 
tion, and $30,000 from student tax money, plus some additional funds 
He noted that the results of the program to date are very en- 
couraging: 907o of the students are still enrolled and want to con 
tinue. President Lederle said these students will become fine 
alumni of the University and great contributors to the Commonwealth. 
He noted that such students will not end up on welfare due in no 
small part to their University of Massachusetts education. This is 
why higher education is the best investment the state can make. 
The Governor's recommendation in House #1 is for $300,000. 

The Boston campus has the largest enrollment of black and 
disadvantaged students in public higher education in the Common- 
wealth. The budget request for UM/Boston was $360,000. However, 
no funds for this program are included in the Boston budget. Amhers 
will share its inadequate appropriation with Boston, but obviously 
the funding will be far short of adequate on both campuses. The 
President pointed out also that heavier financing by the Ford 
Foundation would be quite possible, but only if the Commonwealth 
demonstrates that it, too, believes in this program and provides 
more adequate appropriations. 

Chairman Healey introduced Commissioner Chandler, the 
Commissioner of Agriculture, and welcomed him to the Board. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was made by Chairman Troy. 

The lists of persons recommended for tenure at Boston and 
Amherst (Documents T69-046 and T69-053) were discussed. The 
committee urges approval of the lists. Motion was accordingly made, 
seconded, and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That Tenure Recommendations, as set forth 
in Documents T69-046 and T69-053 for the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst and 
Boston be approved. 

Chairman Troy noted the growing tendency to appeal in 
cases where tenure has not been granted. He mentioned two cases 
now pending, on one of which he has received a "formidable package" 
of background, historical material, from the aggrieved person. He 
expressed the hope that prudence and wisdom would govern in these 
matters. 

As a result of a long search for a Head for the English 
Department, the selection committee has unanimously recommended and 
endorsed a noted and distinguished scholar and administrator. The 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy recommends approval. 
Motion xas made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the appointment of Joseph Frank 
to the position of Professor of English 
with tenure and to the Headship of the De- 
partment. 

A proposal was outlined to establish a Chair in History 
to be known as the Clarence H. and Helen Haring Chair. The man who 
is proposed to be the first incumbent, Professor Lewis Hanke, was 
a former student of Professor Haring. Professor Hanke was said to 
be perhaps the most distinguished Latin American historian in the 
country. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That a CLARENCE H. AND HELEN HARING CHAIR 
IN HISTORY be established; also, that Pro- 
fessor Lewis Hanke be named the first in- 
cumbent. 

Trustee Troy noted that Professor Potash, responding to 
invitation to report on the current situation in the History Depart 
ment, expressed the opinion that things were somewhat quieting down 



The committee has received a proposal that the University 
create an office of Ombudsman. Approximately twenty universities 
now have such an officer. Mr. Troy said the idea originated in 
Scandinavia. The Ombudsman exists to help individuals find an 
answer to their complaints and problems. Reports by such a person 
from year to year should help spot areas that need change. In many 
cases, after review, he would advise the complainant he has no 
grievance; at other times he would have to search through all rele- 
vant records and recommend redress of what might be a just 
grievance. The University now has various procedures and committees 
for handling grievances, but they usually deal with general policies. 
The Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy is willing to 
accept in principle the office of Ombudsman, said Chairman Troy, 
with the understanding that the President and Provost, consulting with 



3185 



Tenure 

Recommendation! 
Amherst and 
Boston 



Headship 

English 

Department 



Clarence H. 
and Helen 
Haring Chair 
in History 



Ombudsman 



186 



TRUSTEE 



Policy on 

Foreign 

Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Silver and his committee, work out the vital details about 
this officer including scope and range of powers; to whom he would 
report; what powers he would have to examine private files; how he 
should be chosen, and tenure of appointment. It is hoped that some 
faculty member can be found who will assume these duties quietly 
and gradually build them up. Mr. Troy commended the report (Senate 
Document 69-023). Accordingly, the committee recommended approval 
of a motion to approve in principle the proposal to establish a 
University Ombudsman, with the details of this office and its 
responsibilities to be worked out by the President (Document T69- 
060) . Trustee Lyons seconded the motion. 

Trustee Sweig objected to the motion. He questioned the 
advisability of a faculty member assuming this role, rather than 
someone outside the academic community. 

Chairman Troy noted that a faculty member could work on 
the duties of Ombudsman for possibly three hours daily and assume 
his usual duties in the balance of time. He noted that a background 
in practicality of the proposed arrangement has been established in 
some twenty large universities. 

There was general discussion, during which question was 
raised as to whether everyone, including students, faculty and even 
Board members might avail themselves of the services of the Ombuds- 
man. The President said this is one of the details he would expect 
to have to clarify. 

Mr. Troy stressed that the recommendation is only for 
approval of the proposal in principle, and that the Trustees may 
reject the plan when it returns for vote. 

After further discussion, the matter was left that the 
President would report to the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy, after consultation with the Ad Hoc Committee for the 
Ombudsman; and, subsequently, report to the full Board of Trustees. 

Dr. Burn's report to the committee on her examination of 
the University's Foreign Programs covered in Document T69-055, 
"CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF STUDY ABROAD 
PROGRAMS" was briefly reviewed by Chairman Troy. Any program must 
advance the interest of the University, enrich significantly the 
curricular offerings and enable faculty to enlarge their experience 
through association with faculty of foreign universities. Above 
all, such programs should enable our students to gain new per- 
spectives through exposure to the new environment. Dr. Burn's re- 
port emphasizes the importance of adequate financial support to in- 
sure the success of the programs, most of which have been 
established on a very modest basis. Trustee Rowland has urged that 
the Office of International Programs should extend to the whole 
University system, so that all campuses may profit from these pro- 
grams. Due to the fact that the Boston campus staff has not had an 
opportunity to review this report, request for a vote will be de- 
ferred until later. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy reported on the Freiburg Program (Document 
T69-056) . The University has been at Freiburg University for three 
years. Despite initial difficulties, this has been a significantly 
successful program. Dr. Burn is recommending approval of the pro- 
gram on at least a three-year basis. This will permit development 
of long-range planning and generate greater confidence in the pro- 
gram as well as facilitate the recruitment of students. It might 
also make it easier to secure outside funds if this were deemed 
advisable at some future time. 

It was reported that the University of Buffalo is in- 
terested in sharing in the program. This would involve splitting 
expenses and widening student recruitment. However, since the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts established this program with strong 
alumni support, the view was expressed that it should be reserved 
exclusively as a University of Massachusetts program. Chairman 
Troy hoped that a significant exchange system will develop between 
professors and students in Freiburg and those on the Amherst and 
Boston campuses. The program is expected to enroll 25-35 students 
on a ratio of two-thirds graduate students to one-third under- 
graduates. After further comment, motion was made, seconded, and 
it was * 

VOTED : That the Freiburg program of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts be approved on a 
three-year basis beginning with the 
sessions of 1969-70. 



3187 



Freiburg 
Program 



Chairman Troy reported on a proposal submitted by Pro- 
fessor David Booth of the Government Department, and two graduate 
students, Vernon Gray and Leslie McLemore, to establish a Coopera- 
tive Black Student Program (Document T69-058) . This calls for 15 
black students who have completed two years of college, to come to 
the University for their junior year to study political science. 
They would then return to their own colleges for the senior year. 
Students with good records will be drawn from black colleges where 
political science offerings are somewhat limited. The group will 
be encouraged to continue on to graduate studies in political 
science to increase the number of black scholars in that important 
area. It is proposed that the $600 out-of-state tuition be waived. 
Instead, this group will pay the equivalent of normal tuition in 
their home institution. This is not a remedial program. It will 
be necessary to get outside funds, but evidence of University 
support should encourage private support. 

Trustee Sweig objected to the use of the term "Black Stu- 
dent Program." He stated it would be preferable merely to add 
these men and women to the student body without color designation. 
He questioned whether other minority groups would be accorded the 
same arrangement. Chairman Troy stated that, if a need were felt afrd 
a proposal properly developed, he could see no reason why it should 
not be considered. 



Cooperative 
Black 
Student 
Program 



3188 



COPE 



UM/ Bos ton 
Nantucket 
Summer 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A tptal of $9,000 is the maximum budget amount involved. 
This involves tuition waivers. President Lederle stated the "needs' 
factor would be applied. There is no dollar contribution. Motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the Proposal to Establish a 
Cooperative Black Student Program as 
detailed in Document T69-058, with 
every effort made to give as much 
assistance as the University is able 
to extend without prejudicing other 
programs. 

Committee Chairman Troy described a proposal submitted by 
UM/Boston and approved by its Faculty Senate, to provide shelter 
for COPE for one year. This is a search group funded with Federal 
money ($84,000) . Its purpose is to seek, out young people of 
promise and encourage them to consider college, to find a college 
they can enter and to assist with scholarships and other forms of 
aid. Previously, COPE was sheltered at Northeastern University. 
The head of. the group and his staff will become employees of the 
Commonwealth if the arrangement is accepted. The program would be 
similar to University sponsorship of UPWARD BOUND. 

Chancellor Broderick said this is a program that has 
worked with a great deal of success for three years. It had been 
the original intent that it would circulate. Now, due to a variety 
of circumstances, it seeks shelter on the Boston campus. Motion 
was then made, seconded, and it. was. 

VOTED : To approve an agreement with the Federal 
Government to sponsor COPE for one year. 

Chairman Troy next described a proposal by Chancellor 
Broderick to establish a summer school at Nantucket in cooperation 
with a group of citizens from the island who have requested support 
for this proposal. The citizens would supply $6,000, and they re- 
quest the University to match this amount. They would provide a 
building for instruction and would also try to find low-cost housing 
for faculty and students. Four or five courses, primarily in the 
field of liberal arts, are proposed. The student body would in- 
clude UM/B students, school teachers and students on the island. 
Some objections have been raised: the added administrative burden, 
whether funds could be used for better advantage elsewhere, UM/B's 
special mandate to develop programs for an urban society; also the 
general question of priorities. Conversely, it was also felt the 
Nantucket program would be an enriching experience for UM/B students 
which might help to compensate for some of the spartan conditions 
at Park Square. 

There was extensive discussion on administration of and 
budget for the program. Since no specific vote was being called 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for by the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, Board 
Chairman Healey requested the committee to convene near the close 
of the full Board meeting in order to develop a specific recommenda- 
tion. 

Trustee Troy said he would like to express what he be- 
lieved to be the sentiments of the Board that everyone is deeply 
disturbed that we may lose our Provost. He thanked the Provost for 
able service over the years and expressed the Board's most serious 
hope that he will continue on with the University, either as 
Provost or as a Professor, but preferably as Provost. 

"Dr. Tippo has provided superb academic leadership and 
the depth of dismay among the faculty and students and Trustees, 
with which his indication that he may resign has been met, merely 
measures our sense of how distinguished his service has been," 
Mr. Troy said. 

Chairman Healey attested that this expression does fully 
reflect the sentiments of the entire Board. The Secretary was 
directed to so record in the minutes and to communicate Mr. Troy's 
remarks to Provost Tippo. 

Chairman Healey said that some of the administrative 
frustrations which, in recent weeks and months have surrounded the 
Provost, the President and other administrators seem to indicate 
that the Board should study the total structure of the University. 
The Board has held some discussions on this. Chairman Healey then 
suggested, through the aegis of the Executive Committee, that a 
committee structure be set up to review (1) the basic hierarchy of 
the University, (in effect, the relationship between the various 
segments in the top administrative structure of the University) and 
(2) a separate study on political and operational problems of the 
segments of the University: Boston, Amherst, and the Medical 
School in Worcester, when it gets operating; also, the problems of 
living together in the community and doing the kind of job that 
has to be done. "The University has grown to the size and complexi 
ty now where the Board ought to sit back and take a good look at 
the way the Trustees relate to the total operation of the Univer- 
sity and the way the various segments within the University relate 
to each other," The Chairman said. 

He also suggested that the Board initiate through joint 
student, faculty, administrator committees on each campus (Amherst, 
Boston and Worcester) a study of the operational system under which 
everyone is trying to do a job which is getting more and more diffi 
cult all the time. The details of these study groups would be 
left to the Executive Committee. 

"The President feels we have come to a point where cer- 
tainly the problems are far different than they used to be," 
Chairman Healey said. He expressed deep concern, "not only about 
the weight upon the Provost, the weight upon the President, but the 



3189 



Provost 

Tippo 

Resignation 



3190 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student 
Activities 



Student 
Government 



Afro -American 
Programs 



Student 
Handbook 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

weight upon Deans, upon faculty heads, Heads of Faculty Departments; 
and, indeed, the weight on students trying to find out what this 
world is all about; and in effect whether we ought to be getting a 
little bit more the consent of the governed as we administer the 
affairs of this University." 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To request the Executive Committee to 
designate as quickly as possible a 
committee structure to review the 
organizational structure of the various 
campuses together with their inter-rela- 
tionships. 

Trustee Lyons, Chairman of the Committee on Student 
Activities, reported on the meeting held April 22. Students want 
more control over matters they feel are solely student affairs, he 
said. They feel the faculty should not determine or have power of 
veto on matters that concern only the social life of the student. 
Man^ of the faculty concur in this position. In addition, the stu- 
dents wish a voice on the dining commons, the library use and hours 
and credit requirements, among other things. No specific changes 
were proposed by the committee since undoubtedly any proposals will 
be presented through proper channels. 

The Afro-American group wants Afro-American Studies Pro- 
grams. It has stated that some courses could be taught by present 
members of the faculty. Concern was expressed, however, for the 
future of the program, now called CCEBS, within which this group of 
black freshmen were admitted. Funds for CCEBS are facing a cutback 
at the state level. This will jeopardize hoped for expansion of 
the program. Furthermore, it follows that the Ford Foundation 
supplemental matching grant would presumably be cut if legislative 
appropriations are cut. Chairman Lyons emphasized that every effort 
should be made to obtain funds necessary to continue and to expand 
this program. The attitude of our disadvantaged students can be a 
positive force in creating better community relations. 

Mr. Lyons noted the reluctance of students to discipline 
other students. On the matter of serious violations, the present 
Disciplinary Code appears to contain contradictions. He read ex- 
cerpts from the Amherst campus Student Handbook, Page 55 (A.l) and 
Page 63 s.4, illustrating such inconsistency. 

Chairman Healey, with reference to the Handbook, 
commented that the area of judicial functions within the University 
community should be included in the general study mentioned earlier 
It would be helpful to establish what the rules are for the 
governance of the University, who enforces them and the judicial 
process for determination of violations and penalties; also, the 
role of the Trustees and other segments of the University community 
Hopefully, this will be a judicial study as well as an administra- 
tive one. 



3191 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A request from the editors of the campus humor magazine, 
to reinstate the traditional name of the magazine, was supported by 
the Student Senate and the Dean of Students. The Provost also 
recommended favorable consideration of the request. The magazine 
has been conducted for a year under the constitution authorized by 
the Board of Trustees and to the satisfaction of the campus commu- 
nity. Accordingly, motion was made and seconded and discussion 
held. 

In response to question, Mr. David Stevens, the editor of 
the campus humor magazine, advised that the publication is wholly 
supported by Student Senate funds. There have been two issues this 
year at an approximate cost of $2300. 

Discussion followed on the fact that the name "YAHOO" had 
become a symbol to the Legislature as well as to the student body. 
In terms of the major problems now confronting the University, it 
was suggested that the problem was a minor one, that students should 
have the right to name their own humor publication and that the con- 
tent of the magazine is what is important rather than the name. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To extend to the editorial staff of the 

Amherst campus humor-satire magazine per- 
mission to resume use of the name YAHOO. 



Trustee Maginnis is recorded as voting no. 
Knowles abstained. 



Trustee 



Chairman Healey advised the student representatives 
present of the reason the Trustees are involved in this matter. 
Even though the publication's funds are derived from the student 
activities tax, the bills are sent out to the students' parents 
under the aegis of the Trustees. The Trustees, in effect, are the 
revenue raising agency source of these funds. Allocation is made 
from funds raised under the authority of the Board of Trustees. 
Therefore, the Board is legitimately concerned. 

The report of the Buildings and Grounds Committee was 
made by Chairman Haigis. He apprised the Board of a proposal by 
Professor Irvine, Chairman of the Astronomy Program, for a site for 
a research project off the Amherst campus. Large acreage for a 
radio astronomy observatory is required. A suitable 20-acre site, 
free from radio disturbance, has been found in a wild life area 
south of Quabbin Reservoir. The land is owned by the Commonwealth. 
A farmhouse and barn already on the site would be useful as a 
laboratory building. The use is compatible with that intended 
by the Division of Fish and Game. No funds are requested; only 
permission to approach the Commonwealth for use of the land - see 
map attached. Motion was made and seconded, and it was 



Yahoo 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

Radio 

Astronomy 

Observatory 



3192 



Dump 

Open Burning 
of Refuse 



Worcester 

Land 

Acquisition 



Wigwam 
Hill 



Progress 
Report 
Worcester 
Construction 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: That approval be granted to approach the 
Commonwealth for use of the site in the 
Swift River Wild Life Sanctuary as out- 
lined on an area map on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer for the purpose 
of securing acreage adequate to establish 
a radio astronomy observatory. 

Trustee Plimpton advised that between twelve and fifteen 
thousand dollars would be made available for this effort by Amherst 
College from a Research Corporation grant. 

Notice has been received from the Commonwealth that open 
burning of refuse on dump property must be discontinued. The only 
alternative is to use sanitary fill. There is no appropriation, 
nor is there engineering approval as yet to dispose of trash in the 
incinerator to be built into new boilers now projected. Chairman 
Haigis stated that a search is being made for gravel banks or a 
similar suitable area for sanitary fill. 

Treasurer Johnson was invited to report on land acquisi- 
tion plans for Worcester. He used a map to locate the six-acre 
Syrian Church property at the corner of Belmont Avenue. He re- 
viewed the background and original plan for acquisition of this 
property. Negotiations on the basis of the three appraisals already 
made have been unsuccessful. A fourth appraisal has been obtained. 
In the meantime, some of the land has been acquired by the city and 
state for widening the streets, installing sewers, etc. A possi- 
bility exists for further development of roads at that intersedtion 
More information will be necessary before further discussion can be 
held with the church relative to acquisition of the property. 

Chairman Haigis reviewed the plan to acquire land in the 
Wigwam Hill area for student housing. One resident has now offered 
his house for sale to the University. After comment and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer be authorized to pro- 
ceed with the acquisition of the house and 
land located at 383 Plantation Street, 
Worcester, Massachusetts based on the 
appraisals on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

Dean Soutter was invited to comment on progress and plans 
for renovation and construction in the Shaw Building at Worcester. 
He advised that inflation had been troublesome as with other 
projects. However, when the costs exceeded the budget, the plans 
were altered to reduce the cost and it is now back within the 
$1,000,000 budget. Laboratories and library plans are underway. 
Superficially, the building may appear to be satisfactory, however, 
the roof leaks, the heating and air conditioning do not operate 
properly and extensive alterations to the plumbing, as well as many 
other repairs, have been necessary. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis reviewed the exhaustive studies made in 
relation to the proposed Power Plant expansion on the Amherst cam- 
pus. Air pollution has become a vital consideration (Document 
T69-061). 

A change from coal to oil is indicated. As a result of 
the Jackson & Moreland Report and further study of alternate 
schemes, a recommendation is made that: 

1. Oil be used as the primary fuel; with 
natural gas as a secondary fuel. 

2. A new oil/gas boiler plant be con- 
structed at the Tillson Farm; the 
existing plant to be used as a standby 
facility for the duration of its use- 
ful life. 

These conclusions were reached after study and analysis 
by experienced members of the School of Engineering staff as well 
as the Master Planning Committee of the University, the Bureau of 
Building Construction and Messrs. Norton and Paradis of the 
University's Physical Plant Department. On the combined basis of 
aesthetics and cost, the committee recommends Scheme 2. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : In accordance with Scheme 2 on the 

attached document, T69-061, that the 
University construct a new oil-fired 
boiler plant (with provision for use 
of gas as a secondary fuel) along the 
railroad siding at the Tillson Farm 
in Amherst, using the existing coal- 
fired plant as a standby facility for 
the duration of its useful life. 

Plans for renovations at 100 Arlington Street on the 
UM/Boston campus were then described. The Heller Report envisaged 
that the main lobby would have a mezzanine. The original design of 
the building makes this feasible. It is now proposed to use the 
mezzanine for a Science Library in conjunction with the labora- 
tories planned for the building. Funds are appropriated for this 
project. 



3193 



was 



After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it 



VOTED : To approve plans as submitted for reno- 
vations on the University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston campus at 100 Arlington Street as 
prepared by architects Drummey, Rosane and 
Anderson. 



Power 
Plant 
Expansion 



UM/Boston 
Renovation at 
100 Arlington 
Street 

Science 
Library 



3194 



Columbia 
Point 



TRUSTEE 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Land in 
Ohio 



Athletic, 
Hockey and 
Convocation 
Facility 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A progress report on developments related to Columbia 
Point indicates that the space program for the first building would 
be ready by the end of summer, 1969. A Master Plan, now before the 
UM/B Faculty Senate, estimates that 15,000 students will be enrolled 
by 1980, 3,000 of which will be mixed graduate students and pro- 
fessional students beyond the bachelor's degree. 

Chairman Haigis asked Chancellor Broderick to inform the 
Board of the plan to structure the University into small colleges 
of two or three thousand students. 

Chancellor Broderick said the master plan envisages the 
possibility of colleges that would be as autonomous as the structure 
of the University would permit in order to provide a variety of ex 
periences on the campus, either in undergraduate work or in the pro- 
fessional schools. The faculty voted to recommend adoption of the 
College Plan to the Board of Trustees. Chancellor Broderick ex- 
pressed the hope that, by the end of the academic year, the major 
questions would be resolved within the Senate and be ready for pre- 
sentation to the Board of Trustees. 

With reference to Columbia Point, Chairman Haigis said 
that progress is being made. Presentation will be made to the 
Governor as soon as possible for the first phase of 5,000 students, 
with a funding request of $150 million. 

The sale of land in Ohio, previously given to the Univer- 
sity by alumnus Murray D. Lincoln was discussed. Trustee Haigis 
said the vote of the Board authorizing negotiations for sale in- 
cluded a clause providing for retention of the mineral rights, in- 
cluding oil. Circumstances which have developed since that time 
necessitate the deletion of this reservation. 

On motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the vote of the Board of Trustees 
of May 31, 1968, authorizing the 
Treasurer to deed the property as 
described (Murray D. Lincoln Land) 
be amended to deed the property to 
the State of Ohio without the reten- 
tion of mineral rights. 

Trustee Sweig is recorded in opposition. 

Chairman Haigis reviewed the proposal for an Athletic, 
Hockey and Convocation facility at Amherst. The site for such a 
facility received consideration, and study by the Master Planning 
Committee, by members of the administration, students, and others. 
A map was posted which outlined the suggested area. After 
discussion and comment, motion was made, seconded, and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the site for the proposed Athletic, 

Hockey and Convocation Facility in Amherst 
as recommended by the Master Planning 
Committee be approved in the location west 
of Commonwealth Avenue in the area of the 
farm buildings including additional park- 
ing to the north of the facility and pro- 
vision for added vehicle circulation as 
schematically shown on the plan presented 
to the meeting and now on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer. 

Trustee Knowles suggested that the model of the Univer- 
sity be updated and put on display. Chairman Haigis agreed this 
should be done as soon as possible. 

Landscaping, in accord with the master plan, is progress- 
ing well in the mall and parking area to the south of Whitmore. 

The report of the Committee on Government and University 
Relations was given by Dean Redfern at the request of Chairman 
Emerson. He reported the Deficiency Budget Request has been sub- 
mitted. Approximately $700,000 had been requested for the balance 
of the fiscal year. The Governor and the Budget Bureau have 
recommended $351,000. That bill is now in the House Ways and Means 
Committee, and it would appear that no action will be taken until 
the regular Fiscal '70 Commonwealth budget has been passed. 

Dean Redfern reviewed the current status of certain bills 
of special interest to the University community. 

Trustee Crowley was recognized. He drew attention to 
Dean Redfern' s impending departure to assume the Presidency of 
Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. He cited the Dean's 
contribution to the University and his work on behalf of the 
Committee on Government and University Relations. He referred to 
the close and constant contact the Dean had maintained with the 
committee in conjunction with Assistant Dean Gugin, Harvey Friedman 
Mr. Cass and others. He mentioned the outstanding results of their 
efforts in carrying on the work. Dr. Redfern, as an administrator, 
he said, has done a marvelous job. 

President Lederle commented there would be a more formal 
acknowledgement of Dean Redfern 's contribution at a later date. He 
reviewed Dr. Redfern 's service to the University beginning in the 
fall of 1961. The President said Dean Redfern was absolutely 
crucial in making the University of Massachusetts an institution of 
which our citizens can be proud. From then on, in a whole variety 



3195 



of ways, Dr. Redfern has made a great contribution, he said. 



The 



President commented on the difficulties naturally associated with 
the role of legislative liaison person. He commended his role in 
obtaining support for the recent capital outlay deficiency bill. 
"We cannot say enough about his contribution," the President said. 
"He is a great loss." 



Model of 
Campus Updated 
and Displayed 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University 
Relations 



Comments on 
Dr. Redfern 



3196 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Acting 
Controller 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey noted that the sentiments expressed were 
the sentiments of the entire Board of Trustees. 

The Presidential agenda included Personnel Actions circu- 
lated in advance of the meeting (Documents T69-054 and T69-054A) . 
The President recommended approval and motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Personnel 

Actions as detailed in Document T69-054, 
together with Supplement #1, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period March 14, 1969 to April 30, 1969 
as detailed in Document T69-054A, which 
document is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now 
in effect as subsequently amended, re- 
vised, added to or repealed by the Board 
of Trustees with respect to professional 
personnel under provisions of Chapter 75 
of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 
648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification 
for each position to which a member of 
the professional staff is hereby appointed, 
promoted, transferred or determined shall 
be as hereafter determined by the Board of 
Trustees or under their authority. 

President Lederle stated that the Controller is on sick 
leave and it becomes necessary to designate the Assistant Controller 
to sign papers in his absence. Accordingly, on motion made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That during the sick leave of Controller 
L. Lawrence Taylor, Assistant Controller 
William H. Maus is designated as Acting 
Controller with full authority to sign 
checks, vouchers, invoices, contracts, 
and other documents and to perform all 
other duties of the Controller of the Uni- 
versity as heretofore' authorized or as may 
from time to time be assigned by the 
Treasurer of the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson presented two groups of transfers be- 
tween subsidiary accounts. The first was for the Amherst campus. 
Chancellor Broderick presented transfers for the Boston campus. 
The Amherst transfers (Document T69-064) were circulated in advance 
of the meeting. The Treasurer stated the transfers were the result 
of the fact the University living within a very restricted budget 
has had to initiate every saving possible in order to get by this 
year. Savings were effected because people were hired on a 
temporary or part-time basis to cover the teaching and workload. 
Salaries had to be paid from 02 and 03 accounts rather than 01 
account. The University recognizes that the ol, 02, 03 accounts 
are all for personnel services, and these funds have been utilized 
in the best way possible. A detailed explanation was supplied with 
the document. Additional funds were necessary in the 14 account, 
particularly for telephone services. New buildings and 186 addi- 
tional offices with faculty and employees required telephones. 
Transfer is recommended from the 04, 09 and 11 accounts to the 14 
account. 

Chancellor Broderick presented transfers between sub- 
sidiary accounts for the UM/Boston. He explained the transfer of 
the 03 is to cover costs for salaries, clerical assistance in the 
Registrar's Office, payment of summer school salaries in the 
present fiscal year, student labor, and other miscellaneous ser- 
vices. The transfer into the 14 account is due to increase in 
telephone facilities in new offices. Transfer into 15 account is 
to cover expenses of furnishing and equipment in two additional 
classrooms at 100 Arlington Street; also, movable partition to pro- 
vide an additional classroom in the Sawyer building; shelving 
equipment for science library at 100 Arlington Street. Motion was 
then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To approve transfers between subsidiary 
accounts for the Amherst campus as 
described in Document T69-064 attached; 
and for the Boston campus as set forth 
in Document T69-065 attached. 

Trustee Pumphret, Chairman of the Building Authority, re- 
ported that the Campus Center and Garage, (Project 11), is moving 
rapidly and will be completed ahead of schedule. The Center is 
757„ complete and will be finished by September; the Garage will be 
completed by October 1. 

Chairman Healey stated that the agenda item - "Projections 
and Predictions - University of Massachusetts 1969-80," should be 
the subject of an all-day meeting. The BHE has requested some 
projections as to enrollment, etc. although this will not commit 
the University irrevocably. The original deadline was April 15. 

After full discussion, Chairman Healey stated that, if 
the document is to be tentative, further opportunity for study 
should be afforded before Board approval is extended. Accordingly, 



3L97 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 
UM/ Amherst 



Subsidiary 

Accounts 

UM/Boston 



Project 11 
Campus Center 
& Garage 



Projections & 
Predictions 
U of M 1969-80 



3198 



Inter- 
segmental 
Communications 
Campaign 



Nantucket 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

it was agreed to advise the BHE that the Trustees will work as ex- 
peditiously as possible, but cannot meet the deadline. 

Dean Redfern informed the Board that all the institutions 
of public higher education are joining cooperatively under the 
sponsorship of the BHE to develop a campaign to inform the citizens 
of the Commonwealth of the needs of public higher education in the 
future as a means of giving needed support to the Legislature and 
Governor to increase appropriations for higher education. 
Assistant Dean Gugin, Mr. Melley and Mr. Keenan are representing 
the University in this effort. Briefly described were some facets 
of the program, including development of radio and television spot 
announcements. A preview showing of this material in the near 
future will afford the members of the Board an opportunity for 
comment and suggestion, prior to the full scale public release. A 
preview showing is also scheduled for the legislative leadership. 

Recess was declared in order to allow the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy opportunity for a brief meeting. 
Chairman Healey requested that members of the Board remain in order 
to insure a quorum. 

The meeting reconvened. A quorum being present, Chairman 
Troy reported on the meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy held to discuss the Nantucket proposal. The result 
was an agreement not to proceed with the program for this year, 
but to study the proposal further. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 




I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



May 30, 1969, 2:00 p.m., U of M, Amherst 



RUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyiden, Chandler, Croce, 
Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, 
Haigis, Knowles, Lyons, Maginnis, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Dr. Richard Saunders, 
Medical School; Acting Dean Gagnon, UM/B; 
Mr. Robert Leo, Office of Commissioner of 
Administration and Finance; Acting Dean 
Shapiro; Dean Dwight Allen; Dean Kenneth 
Picha; Messrs. DuBois, Student Senate 
Representative UM/A and A. Warren, Stu- 
dent Senate Representative UM/B; Miss 
Coulter. 



Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 2:00 p.m. He 
welcomed Mr. Leo, the representative of the Commissioner of Admini- 
stration and Finance of the Commonwealth; also, the student repre- 
sentatives, Mr. Andy Warren of UM/Boston and Mr. John DuBois of 
UM/Amherst. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of April 30, 1969. 

Trustee Troy, Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy, reported that two appeals from faculty members 
who had not been reappointed were heard at the meeting held May 14. 
One case invo Lved the History Department, where the departmental 
executive committee had denied reappointment of an assistant pro- 
fessor; the second case was in the School of Education where the 
Dean refused reappointment to an associate professor. The committee 
has upheld the decision not to reappoint in each instance, and now 
recommends this course of action to the Board. 

Motion was then made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To sustain the action of the Department of 
History Executive Committee; also that of 
Dean Allen of the School of Education deny- 
ing reappointment for the academic year 1969-70 
to those faculty members whose cases are detailed 
in Documents T69-066 and T69-067. 



3l99 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Appeals - 
Personnel 
Cases 



3200 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. DuBois was recognized. He referred to discussion 
held at a meeting of the Faculty Senate, including excerpts, read 
by the Provost, from a letter received from the AAUP, with reference 
to the two appeals. He noted that, although the Faculty Senate 
declined to endorse the two cases specifically, it passed a 
generally worded resolution which called upon the administration to 
respect decisions of the Tenure and Grievance Committee. President 
Lederle inquired whether this meeting also included any suggestion 
that the Tenure and Grievance Committee respect the decisions of 
the Personnel or Executive Committee of the Department. 

Chairman Troy expressed the hope that personnel matters 
of this kind could be settled from now on within the University be- 
tween the departmental executive committees and the faculty members 
involved, or at the administrative level. This would eliminate the 
need to appeal to the Trustees. The Board, he said, is the least 
competent body to make substantive and informed judgments on the 
abilities of the individuals involved. The Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee felt that a vigorous and prestigious Tenure and 
Grievance Committee would provide an answer to the problem. It was 
suggested that the Faculty Senate review the composition and respon 
sibilities of the Tenure and Grievance Committee and to restructure 
it if necessary to give it high distinction in the eyes of the 
faculty and unquestionable strength and prestige within the Uni- 
versity as a whole. This would lend real weight to its conclusions 
and recommendations. In view of the ferment and change in uni- 
versities today, every effort should be made to avoid substituting 
possible pro forma rituals of justice for substantive and relevant 
judgments . 

Chairman Troy supported the present system of appeals and 
referrals, stating that these provide a check on any possible 
arbitrary use of power. 

Provost Tippo informed the Board that the Faculty Senate 
is already aware of this need. It now has a subcommittee working 
on the revamping of the Tenure and Grievance Committee. He pointed 
out that the non-reappointment decision under discussion was voted 
unanimously by seven professional historians. When the appeal 
reached his desk, he felt that he should not overrule their judgment 
without compelling reasons and none has been received. 

The Provost also pointed out that, in both cases under 
appeal, every single AAUP and Board of Trustees policy and pro- 
cedure was followed. The Tenure and Grievance Committee acknowledges 
this fact, and has taken no stand whatsoever on the charge by one of 
the aggrieved professors that there was an infringement of his 
academic freedom. 

Trustee Lyons commented that, if any protest were to be 
made, he would expect it to come from the faculty representative 
but none has been made. 



3201 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Dean Shapiro of the College of Arts and Sciences 
informed the Board that the Tenure and Grievance Committee itself 
has recommended that its structural procedures be reviewed and 
changed. The matter now is in the Faculty Senate. 

Chairman Troy reported that Professot Stock, Acting Head 
of the UM/Boston English Department, presented a proposal for a 
basic revision of the requirements of the English major on the 
Boston campus. The proposal has wide support in the department; 
also, approval of the Executive Committee of the Humanities Divisior 
the Faculty Senate, the Acting Dean and the Chancellor. 

The proposal is, in effect, a return to the elective 
system, as compared to the current procedure of taking prescribed 
courses. The student in the proposed elective system is responsi- 
ble for developing his own pattern for courses. The advisory 
system will be expanded in order to insure proper guidance to stu- 
dents in making their course selections. Conferences will be set 
up. These will be composed of faculty and students with similar 
interests. Meetings will be held frequently to discuss literary 
matters and other problems, and to hear visiting speakers. It is 
expected the conferences will draw faculty and students together, 
adding to the educational enrichment of all participants. English 
majors will still be required to take a minimum of 24 credits with- 
in the department. The program will be carefully reviewed as it 
progresses. It is proposed to begin the program next fall. 



After discussion and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : That the proposed revision in the English 
major requirements (Document T69-068) for 
UM/Boston be approved. 

Chairman Troy described a proposal tendered by Professor 
Evans of UM/Boston for a merger of the Herald-Traveler Repertory 
Company and the UM/Boston Professional Theatre Program (Document 
T69-069). 

The Herald-Traveler Repertory Company wishes to phase out 
their program in about three years and opportunity is extended for 
the UM/Boston campus to carry on. This would be a joint operation 
in the intervening years. Chairman Troy briefly described the 
history of the group and the type of theatrical offerings presented. 
These included English classics, notably Shakespeare, in metropoli- 
tan high schools. The advantages of the program include performing 
a genuine cultural service to the young people of the Commonwealth, 
and bringing to the metropolitan high schools an awareness of the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. The possibility of grants 
and aid from Federal sources was suggested by the Herald-Traveler. 
The newspaper also offered assistance in securing such aid. 
Financial involvement for the University would amount to $35,0C0 a 
year for three years. The Herald would underwrite the remaining 



Revision of 
English 
Major - 
UM/Boston 



UM/Boston 

Theatre 

Program 



3202 



TRUSTEE 



Waiva: of 
Tuition of 
State Colleges 
or Lowell 
Technological 
Institute 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cost. Entire cost is estimated at $98,000 a year. The relation of 
the University to the professional actors, their job status, and 
salaries, would require consideration. The committee agreed that 
this would be an excellent program if the money could be obtained. 
However, after careful investigation by the President, the Treasurer, 
the Chancellor and others, it is regretfully reported that funds 
are not available. 

President Lederle said, as a result of a detailed study, 
it was clear that no way can be found at present to support the 
program. Efforts will be continued in the hope that in another 
year possibly an avenue would be found. Previous University ex- 
perience confirms that one of the problems encountered in financing 
would be that ticket sale income cannot be used to pay salaries or 
otherwise used to support the program. Instead, these monies must 
be returned to the Commonwealth. Thus, all salaries must be paid 
by the University. 

After discussion, it was agreed to lend support to the 
principle of the program and encourage further study of means to 
finance it. 

Motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve in principle the proposal for 
a merger of the Herald-Traveler Repertory 
Company and the UM/Boston Professional 
Theatre Program subject to the availability 
of adequate financing. 

Chairman Troy referred to earlier action by the Board of 
Trustees inviting full-time faculty members of the State Colleges 
and Lowell Technological Institute to take courses at the Uni- 
versity without tuition charges. These institutions now wish to 
reciprocate. They have invited a request from the Board to permit 
full-time University faculty members to take courses without tuition 
through the Continuing Studies Program at the State Colleges, and 
at Lowell Technological Institute. 



After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : That in response to the kind invitation of 
the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and 
the Board of Trustees of the Lowell Technological 
Institute, formal request be made of those 
bodies for waiver of tuition for full-time 
faculty members of the University of Massachu- 
setts who wish to pursue courses through the 
Continuing Studies Program at any of the 
state colleges, or at the Lowell Technological 
Institute. 



3203 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey stated that the report of the Executive 
Committee was primarily concerned with increases in Health Services 
Fees, Boarding Hall Trust Fund changes, and the Graduate Student 
General fee. He asked Treasurer Johnson to elaborate. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the Board that the proposed 
fee increases had been considered and approved by the appropriate 
bodies on campus, including the Student Senate. The increase of $5 
per semester in the Student Health Fee is necessitated by the anti- 
cipated state salary increase, which must be extended also to 
employes carried on certain trust fund operations. The proposed 
$20 increase in board rates at UM/Amherst, bringing the cost to 
$265 per semester, is required for the same reason. 

The Student Senate endorsed these changes with two pro- 
visos. These include increased participation by students through 
membership on committees to help supervise the food service program. 
(There are student committees in each of the dining halls, but they 
would like additional participation) . Also, that the hours of ser- 
vice of meals in the evening be extended for a longer period of 
time. This request had been anticipated. 

The proposed change in the graduate student general fee 
is recommended in order to remove certain inequities. The Treasurer 
recommended that the University revert to the former charge, identi- 
cal with the undergraduate charge. 

The University of Boston proposes an increase in Health 
Service Fees from $4 to $5 for the summer session, and $10 to $12 pet- 
term during the regular academic year. This is designed to cover 
increased costs of operation 

Mr. DuBois was recognized. He stated that the Health 
Service Fee as approved by the Student Senate carried the condtion 
that there would be no further increase in the fee for three years. 
In addition, on the food services fee, he said that the second 
proviso attached was not that the serving time of the third meal of 
the day be extended, but that there be a continuous serving of meals 
from 6:45 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 

President Lederle expressed doubt that it would be possi- 
ble for the Student Senate to bind its successors. He pointed out 
that conditions might change. Obviously, the fees will be kept as 
low as possible and not increased at all if this can be avoided. 
If costs rise, however, the issue will be raised each time, and the 
incumbent Student Senate will be given opportunity to express its 
views . 

Treasurer Johnson said it is contemplated only that the 
serving time for the evening meal be extended. The suggestion of 
6:45 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. service would not allow for such practical 
necessities as clean-up periods. 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



Increase in 
Health Fee 



Increase in 
Board Rates 



Increase in 
Graduate 
Student 
General Fee 

UM/Boston 
Health 
Services 
Fee Increase 



3204 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Staple of the Student Senate was recognized. He 
stated that he was the author of the provision requesting con- 
tinuous serving of meals. He stated he had discussed this with 
Mr. Stoneham, Director of University Food Services, who felt it 
was possible to implement this request without an increase in fees 
In view of the alleged feasibility of the proposal, the students 
felt that some increase in service should accompany the increase 
in rates. 

After discussion, it was agreed that there was too little 
evidence on the practicality of the student proposal. Further con 
sideration, through proper channels, will be given, and a meeting 
of the Trustee Committee on Student Activities will explore the 
matter further. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the student health fee be increased 
to $30 per semester effective for the 
first semester of the 1969-70 academic 
year. 

It was also 

VOTED : That, until and subject to further action 
of the Trustees amending the same, the 
following be and hereby is adopted as the 
schedule of charges for meals to be served 
commencing with the first day of the semester 
to commence in September 1969 in student din- 
ing facilities, other than any owned or leased 
by University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority, operated by the Trustees and that 
the following be and hereby are fixed as the 
fees, rents, rates and other charges for any 
other use of any such facility on and after 
such date: 



Schedule of Charges: 



For 15 meals per week - $265 per semester (this 
does not include meals for holidays or vacations 
of more than one day's duration). 

Per day - $3.12 (Effective for summer school, 
vacation periods, etc.) 

Per meal - Breakfast $ .95 

Lunch 1 . 30 

Dinner 1.65 



3205 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The foregoing rates supersede those established 
by vote of the Trustees, May 3, 1968. Group 
meals, conference rates, individual food and 
drink items -- such amount as the Treasurer 
of the University shall fix to cover the cost 
of materials and special services plus reason- 
able provision for other costs and expenses. 

Fees, rents, rates and other charges for other 
uses of student dining facilities : 

For rental or other use of all or any part of a 
facility -- such amount as the Treasurer of the 
University shall fix to cover the cost of any 
special services plus reasonable provision for 
other costs and expenses. 

Refund Schedule 

A student who withdraws from the University 
after paying a semester meal charge shall be 
entitled to a pro-rata refund on such charge, 
less administrative costs in such amount as 
the Treasurer of the University may fix, pro- 
vided, that no such refund shall be charged 
against any meal charge proceeds which are 
payable to University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority under any Management and Services 
Agreement relating to any dining facility owned 
or leased by the Authority. The Treasurer shall 
report to the Trustees all charges, fees, rents 
and rates established by him under authority of 
this resolution. No such charge, fee, rent, or 
rate so established shall be reduced, but may 
be increased, without prior approval of the 
Committee of the Trustees on Buildings and 
Grounds . 

It was also 



VOTED: That the schedule of charges set forth in 

the foregoing vote be and hereby is recommended 
to University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority for adoption as the schedule of 
charges and other fees for meals served in 
and other uses of dining facilities owned or 
leased by it and that the Secretary of the 
Trustees be and hereby is directed to certify 
these votes to the Authority as the writing 
provided for in Management and Services Agree- 
ments now in effect between the Commonwealth 
and the Authority pertaining to such dining 
facilities . 



3206 



UM/ Bos ton 
Renovations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : That the vote of January 30, 1967 with 
reference to Graduate School Summer 
School. fees be revised as follows: 

To delete "A fee of $2.50 per credit 
hour shall be assessed for each summer 
session" and add - The Summer Session 
fees charged to graduate students for 
such facilities and services as the 
Infirmary, Student Union and Activities 
shall be assessed on a per week basis at 
the same rate as for undergraduate students. 

The Treasurer then submitted for consideration and 
approval, Contract #3, Phase IV Renovations for the University at 
Boston. These renovations at 100 Arlington Street include addition 
of a mezzanine floor for a science library in the main lobby, plus 
additional work throughout the building. Four bids were received - 
ranging from $327,000 to $433,870. The estimate was $368.00. Low 
bid of $327,000 came from W. T. Rich Company, Inc., Newton, Massa- 
chusetts . 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To award the contract #3, Phase IV Renovations 
to 100 Arlington Street, UM/B to the lowest 
eligible bidder W. T. Rich Co., Inc., Newton, 
Mass. in the sum of $327,000 and to authorize 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson to execute the 
contract. 

The President submitted personnel actions, copies of 
which had been supplied in advance of the meeting, to the members 
of the Board. After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and 
it was 



Personnel 
Actions 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Personnel 

Actions as detailed in Doctument T69-070, 
together with Supplement #1, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 



It was also 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period May 1, 1969 to May 30, 1969 as 
detailed in Document T69-070A, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 



1 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to 
or repealed by the Board of Trustees with 
respect to professional personnel under pro- 
visions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or determined 
shall be as hereafter determined by the Board 
of Trustees or under their authority. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 

Titles effective on and after June 1, 1969, 
as detailed in Document T69-071, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classifi- 
cation shall not be designated by any job 
group number or grade. 

President Lederle recommended approval of the graduate 
and undergraduate degrees to be awarded at Commencement on May 31, 
1969. Since the list is not yet fully certified, the vote must be 
conditional. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the lists of graduate and under- 
graduate degrees awarded as of May 31, 1969, 
subject to each person meeting the academic 
and other requirements as may be appropriate, 
and subject to certification at the earliest 
possible date by the Office of the Registrar. 

President Lederle noted that there were 1981 persons re- 
ceiving bachelors, degrees; 330 receiving masters degrees; 37 Ph.D.s; 
7 Doctors of Education and 5 Four College Ph.D.s for a total of 
2360 graduates. 

In response to question, the President briefly described 
the Four College degree. He said that the appropriate hood in- 
corporates the colors of the member colleges and the University. 



3207 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



Undergraduate 
Degrees 

Graduate 
Degrees 



Four 

College 

Degree 



3208 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A joint committee composed of faculty members representing all mem- 
ber institutions is involved. The doctorate is given by the Uni- 
versity. 



Transfers Be- 
tween Subsid- 
iary Accounts: 
UM/Boston and 
the Medical 
School 



The President submitted two transfers between subsidiary 
accounts: the first, at UM/Boston, involved Account 1350-02, and 
called for a transfer of $17,000 from the 02 account to the 03 
account; the second involved Medical School Account 1350-38, and 
called for a transfer of $20,000 from the 01 account to the 03 
account. 

The President advised that the transfers were in struct 
accord with the policy of treating the ol, 02, and 03 personnel 
accounts as one account. 



Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve transfers between subsidiary 
accounts at UM/Boston and the Medical 
School as detailed below: 

Boston - Account 1350-02 

From: 02 Salaries, temporary $17,000 
To: 03 Services, non-employees 17,000 

An additional $17,000 is needed in the 03 
account to pay the salaries of Summer School 
teachers for the month of June. These teachers 
are needed to handle the anticipated enrollment. 
The $17,000 is available in the 02 account. 

Medical School - Account 1350-38 

From: 01 Salaries, permanent $20,000 
To: 03 Services, non-employees 20,000 

Much of the educational planning of the 
Medical School is being accomplished through 
the use of consultants. This is because full- 
time faculty have not been employed in all of 
the specialities. Funds are available in the 
salary account for this transfer. 

Chairman Healey read to the Board a letter from former 
Trustee McNamara, expressing appreciation for the citation pre- 
sented upon his retirement. The Chairman commended Mr. McNamara 's 
contributions to the Board during his years of service. 



At the request of Acting Dean Gagnon, Chairman Healey ex- 
tended an invitation to all Trustees to attend the first Commence- 
ment of the University of Massachusetts at Boston, to be held 
June 12 at 10:00 a.m. in the War Memorial Auditorium. A luncheon 
will follow. He suggested the Trustees communicate their plans to 
attend to Acting Dean Gagnon. 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



] 



3 2 09 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle suggested that, in the absence of Dean 
Gagnon who had to leave the meeting early, the Trustees could 
respond to Secretary McCartney. He stated that trustee gowns and 
other paraphernalia would be moved from Amherst to Boston for the 
ceremony. 

Chairman Healey encouraged the members of the Board to 
attend. He said this has been a deeply troublesome year in American 
education. The University has the largest full-time enrollment of 
any University in New England. The campus at Boston has been 
packed with students living under nearly impossible physical 
conditions. To have come through this year without major strife, 
and with a recognition of responsibility at all levels, is a 
remarkable achievement, Mr. Healey said. He suggested that the 
Board commend the administration, faculty and students of the state- 
wide University in Amherst, Boston and Worcester for their per- 
formance throughout the year in getting through a very troublesome 
period. 

Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED '. To commend the students, faculty and ad- 
Ministration on all campuses of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts for exercising 
a high degree of responsibility by coming 
through the academic year now concluded - 
one of the most troublesome and violent 
periods in the history of American higher 
education - without any major strife, dis- 
order, or disruption of the educational 
process . 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Robert J. MpCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustee; 



3 2 9A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 18, 1969, 4:00 p.m., Room 419, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; Trustees 
Boyden, Chandler, Croce, Crowley, Frechette, 
Gordon, Greenblatt, Haigis, Knowles, Lambson, 
Lyons, Maginnis, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Sullivan, Troy, Snowden, Secretary McCartney 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting, called for the pur- 
pose of an important announcement, into executive session at 4:00 p.ijn 

At the close of the session Chairman Healey announced that 
President Lederle had submitted a letter of resignation, to 
become effective at the end of the academic year 1969-70. The 
Board had, with deep regret, accepted the President's decision. 



The President's letter to the Chairman and the Board 



follows : 



"When I came to the University of Massachusetts in 1960 
I set for myself ten years as the outside limit of my tenure in 
presidential office. I have always felt that a president makes 
his major contribution within his first ten years. Although there 
are some tasks that remain to be done, after ten years it is better 
that a board of trustees select a new man, one who can bring new 
ideas and suggest different educational paths for a university as 
called for in a day of dynamic social change. 

For some time past I have been the senior state university 
president in New England. I have already held office longer than 
the national norm. If I may indulge in some humor currently pre- 
valent among my presidential colleagues: "it is a good idea to quit 
before one falls farther behind." 

I therefore write to apprise you, and through you the 
Board of Trustees, of my resignation as President to become effectiv^ 
at the end of the academic year 1969-70. I give you this notice now 
so that you may have ample time in which to search for my successor. 
Pending his arrival I shall, of course, devote my full attention and 
energy to the advancement of the University system in Amherst, 
Boston and Worcester. 

My decision is based on my firm belief in what is good for 
the University. I resign with the highest regard for the members 
of the Board of Trustees and with deep appreciation for the privi- 
lege they have afforded me to lead the University during this period 
of rapid growth not only in size but in quality. It is hard to 
realize that enrollment has increased from slightly more than six 
thousand students in 1960 to a planned twftnty-one thousand next fall 



5 2 09 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

As I have said many times, "The University is people!" 
In the popular mind the President gets the credit, but the truth 
is that any success we have achieved is due to the backing of an 
outstanding faculty and of a dedicated group of administrators 
rHusTEE who have worked ably as my administrative team. If there is any 
discredit, as President I am glad to assume that alone. 

One of my great satisfactions and challenges as President 
has been the opportunity to work both in Boston and in Amherst with 
outstanding and responsible students. The University has pioneered 
in the involvement of students in the development of policy at all 
levels clear up to the Board of Trustees. We have established and 
will continue to develop a tripartite academic community in which 
students, faculty and administration work cooperatively toward the 
common goalof academic excellence. 

I have been grateful as President for the hand of friend- 
ship extended by governors, state legislators, and state house 
administrators. Although our budget requests have frequently been 
cut and we have not received the kind of financial support which 
would put us in the forefront of public institutions, , we have made 
tremendous progress. It is only because the Commonwealth started 
from such a low base that the very real effort of recent years has 
been obscured. 

I would be remiss if I did not express my grave concern 
for the thousands of qualified applicants we must turn away each 
year. Without greatly increased financial support for public 
higher education -- community colleges, technical institutes state 
colleges and the University -- thousands of Massachusetts youth 
will find the door to college slammed shut in the years just ahead, 
and our greatest natural resource will be lost to us. 

When I leave the presidency next year I should like to 
return to my professional field of political science in a faculty 
position where I can teach and do research. This will also permit 
closer contact with students which I have missed. I shall continue 
to promote the University's welfare, albeit in a different role. 
I look forward to the day when the University will be truly 
recognized as the "People's University," and I will continue to 
support the Board of Trustees in bringing this dream to fruition 
on behalf of the youth of the Commonwealth." 

Chairman Healey's press statement of the following day 
is attached to, and made part of, these minutes. 



I 



3 2 09C 



with respect to the Resignation of Dr. John W. Lederle as President 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Statement of Joseph P. Healey, Chairman of the Board of Trustees , 



of the University of Massachusetts 



"The Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts at 
a special meeting in Boston yesterday afternoon accepted with deep 
regret the resignation of Dr. John W. Lederle as President. It is 
clear that Dr. Lederle 's resignation is not related to budgetary or 
other problems with which the University is currently involved. As 
Dr. Lederle indicates it stems rather from a long-held personal con- 
viction that a ten-year span represents the practical outer limits 
of effective academic leadership. 

Under Dr. Lederle ' s dynamic and resourceful direction the 
University of Massachusetts has grown greatly in size and quality. 
Its scheduled fall enrollment of 21,000, the largest full-time 
student body in New England, is more than three times the number 
enrolled in 1960 when Dr. Lederle 's tenure as President began. With 
the increase in size has come a steady and dramatic improvement in 
academic programs. Today the University of Massachusetts stands reader 
to take its place among the great state universities in the nation. 

We are happy that Dr. Lederle will continue as President 
during the coming academic year, and plans to return to a teaching 
role at the University in his professional field of political science 
The Trustees have presently under way a study of the entire Univer^ 
sity structure, including the inter-relatioaships of the various 
segments within the system. It is expected that this study will be 
completed early aer.c fall at which time a committee will be appointed 
to direct the search for a new president. 

There are no illusions about the difficulties involved in 
view of the rising number of vacancies in the ranks of college and 
university presidents. Unless something is done to lessen the 
pressures and frustrations of top administrators in American 
universities, a period much less than ten years may be the realistic 
term for any future successor to Dr. Lederle." 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:40 p.m. 




Robert J. M 
Secretary, 



irtney 
yard of Trustees 



] 



TRUSTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



3 210 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 30, 1969, 2:00 p.m. Waltham Field Station, Waltham, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Croce, Frechette, 
Gordon, Haigis, Knowles, Lambson, 
Lyons, Maginnis, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Snowden, Sweig,,Troy; Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Associate Treasurer Brand, Business 
Manager Grady, Dean D. Allen, 
Hospital Director Stockwell, Dr. 
Richard Sanders, Medical School; 
Dean Spielman, Mr. Sidney Myers, 
Mr. David Gugin, Field Station 
Director John Naegele, Budget Director 
Morrell, Mr. Cope, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, UM/A; Planning Officer 
O'Brien, UM/B; Professor Marcus, Pro- 
fessor Reid, Mr. Yelton, UM/A Graduate 
Student Senate; Dean McGuirk, Dean 
Bischof f . 



The provisions of Chapter 626, Acts of 1958, having been 
complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being present 
and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order by the Chair- 
man at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees held May 30, 1969; 
also, those of the meeting of June 18, 1969. 

President Lederle commented on the current status of the 
budget. He drew attention to the budget analysis for the Amherst 
campus for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1970 (Document T69-088) . 
The original request for $49 million was cut $11 million to an 
appropriation of $38 million by a succession of actions from the 
Governor through the Legislature. The Governor's recommendation of 
$38.7 was reduced by House vote to $37.1, and subsequently restored 
$38.7 by the Senate. The final appropriation as signed by the 
Governor was $38 million. This appropriation is $663,700 below the 
Governor's recommendation for Amherst in the 01 through 16 operating 
accounts. A supplemental budget request will be filed, and it is 
anticipated the Governor will support his original 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommendation and approve the request. In the event a supplemental. 
budget is not approved, plans must be put into effect for further 
restrictions in operational programs. The cuts make necessary a 
substantial reduction in student support. Document T69-088A, an 
analysis of the effect of budget cuts at UM/A, was reviewed by 
Provost Tippo. Special points were that $700,000 of 03 money had 
been cut out by the House and that educational supplies, Account 
13, had been increased merely $25,000 over the previous year in 
spite of the addition of 1500 students. This allows only $16 per 
student for supplies. Similarly, Account 14, office supplies, was 
increased only $30,000 over the previous year despite the addition 
of 100 faculty. A serious reduction of $39,000 in Account 15, 
equipment, was discussed, as well as the fact that the library book 
appropriation remained the same as it has for five years in spite 
of an interim enrollment increase of 8,000 students. 

The Disadvantaged Students Program is short by $100,000 
of the sum required to maintain and continue this program. The re- 
sult of the cut in 03 funds by the House means it will be impossible 
to employ clerical, secretarial, physical plant employees, despite 
the obvious need due to the addition of 1500 students and 100 new 
faculty. 

The possible courses of action were outlined. These in- 
cluded placing a "freeze" on filling new faculty positions and all 
vacant positions, both professional, non-professional and faculty. 
The Provost pointed out this would mean cancelling dozens of class 
sections and some courses for the fall of 1969. He stated that at 
present 39 math sections are without teachers. Elimination of the 
1970 summer school and the swing-shift freshman program will be con 
sidered. Reduction of student counsellors and heads of residence 
may occur. This will result in lack of adult supervision of resi- 
dence halls. Considered also will be reduction of student and other 
part-time help. 

The budget for the Boston campus, President Lederle re- 
ported, was increased over the Governor's recommendation, primarily 
through addition of money for library books and funds for the Dis- 
advantaged Student Program. 

The President reported that the Worcester Medical School 
is still expected to open in the fall of 1970, and great effort is 
being exerted in this direction. He stressed the vital need for 
having faculty to plan courses and curriculum. The Governor has not 
recommended appropriation for this purpose. Pending his review of 
the program, it has not reached the Legislature for consideration. 
The President expressed the hope that this would soon be resolved. 
He pointed out the need for a gubernatorial recommendation for an 
operating appropriation in the area of at least six or seven 
hundred thousand dollars to get the program off the ground. He 
stated that, in all areas, the University is suffering very serious 
budgetary handicaps. Every effort will be made to recoup the funds 
cut through a supplemental request. 



3211 



Medical 
School 



3212 



Waltham 

Field 

Station 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gordon stated that the Provost analyzed very well 
the courses of action required by the budget situation facing the 
University this year. It should be made clear to parents and others 
that we are honoring our obligation to admit those students who are 
coming in now as swing- shift freshmen and in the fall as freshmen 
and upperclassmen in the University. He noted that a freeze would ih 
effect be put on quality, through reduction in some sections, but 
that the students would be accepted as indicated earlier. 

At a fall meeting of the Board, as a result of a study, a 
policy should be established before additional freshmen are ad- 
mitted for 1970. Once the full dimensions of the budget have been 
established, the Board should take a hard look at total admission 
processes, perhaps consider a cutback of the 1500 additional student^ 
in 1970, unless there can be better assurance of maintaining our 
present degree of quality. Mr. Gordon continued that it was unfair 
to admit students and cut back on classes. He expressed the hope 
that a policy decision could be made before admission processes get 
too far advanced. Trustee Troy stated in agreement that it will be 
tragic to cut back on students in 1970 with so many able applicants 
clamoring for education; but if the University is to remain a 
quality institution there may be no alternative. 



Chairman Healey agreed that these problems have been a 
continuing source of concern. He stated that a program should be 
set up to meet these cuts, and the legislative leadership and execu 
tive department should be apprised of what is projected. The Chair 
man said it was time everyone came to grips with the problem. 

President Lederle stated that $18 less per student (in 
Accounts 3-16) will be available this coming year than the previous 
year, which in itself was a very poor year. The Legislature is in 
a difficult situation on revenues, but it is important that they 
understand also the University's stringent condition as it attempts 
to serve the students of the Commonwealth. If 1500 students are 
added, a growth factor should be built into the budget. Otherwise, 
it will be necessary to consider going over to a tentative rather 
than a firm admissions policy. The President assured that all 
commitments to students presently accepted would be honored. There 
will, of necessity, be a dilution of quality. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Director John Naegele 
of the Waltham Field Station addressed the meeting. He welcomed 
the members of the Board of Trustees and others and briefly 
described the scope of the Waltham operation. The Field Station 
has been active for more than 53 years. The Waltham site became a 
part of the Department of Environmental Sciences five years ago. 
There is also a department and building on the Amherst campus. The 
major part of the faculty are at Waltham. There are 15 faculty 
positions and 42 support positions. The station also operates off 
the Waltham site in the south end of Boston and in Roxbury with 
federal-supported extension personnel who operate a nutrition pro- 
gram in South Boston (14 employed) ; and with young people in 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Roxbury (13 employed) , so that there are about 85 people on the 
payroll. 

The program is primarily research and adult education. 
The research staff has achieved national status in four specific 
areas: (1) air pollution (2) pesticides and effect on environment 
(3) plant breeding, including broccoli, carrots and squash (4) the 
problem of corn genetics. 

The extension program is concerned not only with agri- 
cultural production but also with suburbia. Dr. Naegele referred 
to a recent visit of the Governor to the station and noted the 
logic of the agricultural experiment station's concern with 
community and resource development. The Waltham Field Station ad- 
vises the Department of Public Health on air pollution standards, 
the Harbor Islands Conference and other committees of the Governor. 

Chairman Healey then welcomed Mrs. Muriel Snowden to her 
first meeting as a member of the Board of Trustees. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was made by Chairman Troy. He reminded the Board that since 
the resignation of Dean Moore of the Graduate School, Professor 
Arthur Gentile has served as Acting Dean. In the meantime a 
committee appointed by the President, composed of 18 faculty 
members from a variety of disciplines and representatives of the 
Graduate Student Senate, conducted a search for a permanent dean. 
They now recommend for Graduate Dean Dr. Mortimer H. Appley, Pro- 
fessor and Head of the Department of Psychology who has served on 
the UM/ Amherst faculty for two years. The Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy had an opportunity to meet Professor Appley and 
discuss his views on the scope and purpose of graduate study and 
were impressed. 

Chairman Troy briefly reviewed Dr. Appley 1 s distinguished 
record of teaching, research, administration and professional ser- 
vice. After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the appointment of Professor 
Mortimer H. Appley as Dean of the 
Graduate School of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. 

A proposal for revision of the Physical Education re- 
quirement was submitted by Dean Bischoff . Chairman Troy stated 
that the program, as described in Document T69-087 supplied in ad- 
vance of the meeting, had been approved by the Faculty Senate. The 
revision proposes that one year of activity courses or a one 
semester lecture/lab course be required; two credits to be awarded 
in either case. 



3213 



Trustee 
Snowden 

Report of the 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Appointment 
Dr. Appley - 
Dean of the 
Graduate 
School 



Revision 
Physical 
Education 
Requirement 



^fc. * "A A I 



Ph . D . in 

Human 

Movement 



Graduate 
Program in 
Ocean 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo noted that the Faculty Senate, although 
approving the proposal, moved that two hours be added to the 
graduate requirement; however, in the absence of supporting reasons 
he did not recommend this to the Faculty and Educational Policy 
Committee and it did not become a part of the motion. If advisable, 
it can be reactivated at a later time. After discussion, motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the revision of the Physical 
Education requirement as set forth in 
Document T69-087. 

A proposal for a program of study in Physical Education 
leading to a Ph.D. degree in Human Movement (i.e. human motor 
activity) was made by Associate Dean Bischoff, who held that such 
a program would be unique in the country. This proposal had re- 
ceived the enthusiastic support of Deans Gentile, Picha and Allen 
who were present, as well as Professor Ulin, the representative of 
the Faculty Senate Academic Matters Committee. Document T69-082 
fully described the proposal. The additional cost will be minimal. 
Chairman Troy assured the Board that the program has been gone over 
most carefully. 

Discussion was held during which Provost Tippo said this 
was a sound academic program as borne out by the Faculty Senate and 
Graduate Council endorsement. After further consideration, motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the graduate program in 

Physical Education leading to a Ph.D. 
degree in Human Movement as set forth 
in Document T69-082 attached hereto 
and made a part of these minutes. 

The Chairman apprised the committee of a proposal for 
establishment of a graduate program in Ocean Engineering submitted 
by Dean Picha of the School of Engineering. Copies of Document 
T69-083 in full explanation were supplied in advance of the meeting. 
This proposed program grew out of a research program, THEMIS, to 
which the students have reacted with great interest. It combines 
knowledge of the ocean with engineering skills to utilize the oceans 
and their contents or boundaries for the achievement of human 
objectives. The coastline of the Commonwealth is adapted to such a 
program; it provides a wealth of ocean resources. The economy 
benefits from a highly developed ocean industry. 

There is a graduate program in marine sciences and the 
new program would share some common interests: sites, equipment 
and research projects, for example. The Chairman noted that the 
Boston campus is to be located on the ocean and the program could 
share in its research project. The major difficulty is money. If 
the program is to grow, it must receive large scale federal support. 
Capital investment, spread over a seven-year period, would be in 
the area of a million dollars. Operating expenses for a fully 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

developed program would be approximately $200,000 a year. Dean 
Picha expressed confidence that large federal support would be 
forthcoming since Ocean Engineering is an area in which the federal 
government shows increased interest. 

After considerable discussion, the committee- concluded 
that while, at present, it would not be acceptable to proceed fully 
with this ambitious and expensive program, a modest beginning 
should be established in order to be able to negotiate for the 
federal support that would enable expansion in the future. Dean 
Picha felt the program could operate on a useful, though modest 
basis, from 1969 through 1971 with present equipment and staff. 
Funds of approximately $20,000 which would be used for new equip- 
ment, travel to the coastal areas and the like, would be required. 
It was agreed that if, after two years, federal support had not 
been secured, the program would be phased out. 

In response to Trustee Knowles' question, Chairman Troy 
assured this would not be duplication of any Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts Technological Institute program. He said this program 
envisages research into instrumentation for ocean experiments, 
marine biology, etc. Professor Heronemus was invited to comment. 
He agreed there would be no duplication of any work presently being 
carried on by Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute at 
Woods Hole, though it could contribute to expansion of it or be 
parallel to the efforts. He advised that Woods Hole has created 
its own department in the last year. They have room for only 10-12 
students a year, which is entirely inadequate in terms of active 
student interest. 

The Provost emphasized that the program would be expected 
to operate on current budgets. It would be required to go out and 
secure additional state and federal funding. In the event this was 
not forthcoming, the program would be discontinued. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To establish a graduate program in Ocean 
Engineering, subject to the availability 
of state and federal funds. 

Chairman Troy described the proposal submitted by the 
Dean of Education for a Ph.D. degree in Education. He noted that 
a grant of $150,000 from the Ford Foundation would be used to im- 
plement the program. No additional budgetary costs for faculty 
would be required. The Chairman stated that the details of this 
excellent, imaginative and valuable program are incorporated in 
Document T69-084. 

Dean Allen responded to question as to the distinction 
between the Ph.D. and Doctor of Education now offered in this pro- 
gram. In the Ph.D. the emphasis is in the direction of research 



3215 



Ph.D. in 
Education 



3216 



TRUSTEE 



Robert 
Morrison 
Maclver 
Chair in 
Sociology & 
Government 



Faculty 

Senate 

Resolution 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and scholarships. The Doctor of Education emphasis is directed 
toward field experience, field application and toward the 
practitioner of education. 

There was discussion during which Trustee Sweig expressed 
negative reaction to granting the Ph.D. when the Doctorate in Edu- 
cation is already available. Chairman Troy stated the Doctor of 
Education degree did not adequately describe the program of study. 
He pointed out that these two degrees had been established by 
precedent in other institutions. 

Provost Tippo stated the difference in title indicates the 
difference between a practitioner and a researcher. Motion was ther 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the graduate program in the 

School of Education leading to the Ph.D. 
degree as set forth in Document T69-084, 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 

The proposal from the Department of Sociology that a chair 
be named after the eminent scholar and professor, Robert Morrison 
Maclver, Document T69-085, was described by Trustee Troy. It is 
proposed that the first occupant be Professor Hans Speier. 

The distinguished background of Professor Maclver was out' 
lined. He is Lieber Emeritus Professor of Political Philosophy and 
Sociology at Columbia. 

Chairman Troy suggested that the number of such chairs be 
limited lest the prestige be diminished. After consideration and 
on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That a chair be named for Professor 
Robert Morrison Maclver in Sociology 
and Government and that its first 
occupant be Professor Hans Speier. 

Chairman Troy advised the Board that Faculty Senate 
Secretary Gordon appeared to present the views of the Senate on the 
power, rights and duties of the Faculty vis-a-vis the administra- 
tion on all decisions respecting promotion and tenure. This is a 
matter of critical importance. The committee did not have sufficient 
time to study the Faculty proposal. Discussion and decision was de- 
ferred until a later meeting. Chairman Troy reminded the Board of 
his suggestion at the May meeting that the Faculty Senate review 
and possibly restructure the Tenure & Grievance Committee. Soon 
consideration must be given also to the newly revised constitution 
of the UM/Boston Faculty Senate which raises many of the same 
issues. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Provost noted that each Trustee had received a copy 
of the pamphlet entitled Statement on Government of Colleges and 
Universities. He said this is the document the committee proposes 
to consider at the next meeting. 

Chairman Troy advised that Chancellor Broderick had sub- 
mitted two overscale appointments to the committee: one in English 
and one in Economics. Both are very distinguished men in their 
respective fields. The committee recommended favorable action to 
the Board. After consideration, motion was made, seconded and it 
was 

VOTED : To approve the appointment of Professor 
Robert Hoopes as Professor of English • 
with tenure and Dr. Harvey Segal as Pro- 
fessor of Economics with tenure, both at 
UM/Boston. 

The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, 
held jointly with the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, 
was made by Chairman Haigis. He briefly reviewed the plan to ac- 
quire certain property in Worcester. In accord with this plan an 
"Offer to Sell and/or Offer of Settlement of Land Damages" has been 
filed by Mr. and Mrs. Alan Anderson, landowners within the limits 
of the proposed purchase and development area. As provided in this 
agreement, the seller may occupy the dwelling house on the premises 
for a year, rent free, at their own risk and expense, before 
adaptation of the property to University use. After consideration, 
motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That, in accordance with Chapter 847 
Item 8066-98 of the Acts of 1965, and 
all other acts, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
land, or land with buildings thereon, 
by purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws, for the 
development of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Medical School in the City of 
Worcester; independent appraisals having 
been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Kenneth W. 
Johnson, Treasurer; that the Trustees of 
the University purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Alan R. and 
Joan E. Anderson situated at 382 Plantation 
Street, in Worcester, Worcester County, 
Massachusetts and more particularly 
described in a deed recorded June 14, 1963 
at the Worcester District Registry of Deeds 
in Book 4377, Pages 220 and 221, and that 
the purchase price for said property be 
Twenty One Thousand ($21,000.00) Dollars, 



3217 



UM/Boston 
Overscale 
Appointments 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 

Alan 
Anderson 
Property - 
Worcester 



3218 



UM/ Bos ton 
Master Plan 
Columbia 
Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and that the conveyance be subject to the 
conditions and agreements as set forth in 
the option for the purchase of the said 
property signed by the said Alan R. and 
Joan E. Anderson. 

The joint committee meeting also considered the UM/Boston 
Master Plan. Chairman Haigis requested Chancellor Broderick to 
elucidate. 

The Chancellor said that the joint committees had approved 
a project for UM/Boston which involves commitment to the physical 
plan which anticipates locating 5,000 students at the Columbia Point 
campus by 1972. Approved in principle was a program outlined by the 
UM/Boston Faculty Senate involving, basically, the division of 
UM/Boston into a college system. There would be six colleges, each 
with 2,000 undergraduates and 500 graduate students. It is antici- 
pated there will be 15,000 students at UM/Boston by 1980: 12,000 
undergraduates, 3,000 graduate students. The committees considered 
and passed the resolution (copies distributed in advance of the 
meeting) , part of which refers to the physical plan prepared by 
Director of Planning O'Brien and part of which refers to the 
academic plan prepared by the Senate." 

In response to request, Professor Weaver of UM/Boston 
described the academic plan. He stated that, essentially, it calls 
for liberal arts colleges. No professional schools have been 
planned. Before this happens, study committees will be appointed. 
The liberal arts colleges will be under some simple control of the 
degree granting institution, but will have emphasis on different 
fields of study. They will vary among themselves. It is hoped 
that each college will be able to offer a degree. 

Planning Director O'Brien stated the academic master plan 
had been translated into space, and the space into cost. The space 
requirements for 1980 level (15,000 students) resolves into approxi- 
mately 200 square feet per student in accord with the common Univer- 
sity practice throughout the United States. The cost of the pro- 
gram, through 1980, in current dollars, is estimated at approxi- 
mately $260 million, and by the time of completion, due to anti- 
cipated escalation, will cost approximately $400 million. The 
initial phase for 5,000 students will account for one-third, since 
it must include some central facilities. The approximate cost is 
$150 million. 

The costs, Mr. O'Brien noted, are based on space required 
and cost of acquiring land, designing, equipping and constructing 
the space for education. Also included is allowance for escalation 
on an extremely compressed design construction schedule. 

In response to Chairman Healey's question, Mr. O'Brien 
assured the Trustees that the $400 million figure takes full account 
of escalation through 1980, figured at a rate of 107« per annum. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3219 



The academic plan, including the space required to carry 
out that plan as well as other items that make it possible to ac- 
quire the land, to design, to construct and to equip are included 
in the legislation. Mr. O'Brien stressed the extreme importance of 
maintaining a rapid schedule. He stated it is possible to expedite 
the program by compressing the design and construction schedule. 
Due to the current practice of the Commonwealth by which the Uni- 
versity is the ultimate client and the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction is the proximate client, it will be extremely difficult 
to achieve the desired completion date without additional planning 
staff. This could involve the allocation of two BBC staff men to 
this project as their sole responsibility. The time schedule canno 
be maintained unless this is done. Another possible solution, not 
now incorporated in the legislation, is some form of Authority or 
Commission which would have the responsibility of building the Uni- 
versity at Columbia Point. 

Chancellor Broderick pointed out the immediate need for 
places in higher education for the young people in the Common- 
wealth. He stated that existing projections for 1980 indicate 
there will be almost 100,000 places short. He commented on the 
escalation of costs at approximately 10% a year and re-emphasized 
the need to move quickly with construction. 

The Chancellor stated that a meeting was scheduled for 
the following day with the planning architects. He suggested that 
the next step should be a meeting with the Governor to urge his 
support in filing special legislation. 

In response to Trustee Pumphret's question, Mr. O'Brien 
stated that the University does not yet own the land at Columbia 
Point. A vote of the Board would be necessary to authorize land 
acquisition at the site. Also, appraisals must be secured in ad- 
vance of the vote authorizing acquisition. There was discussion, 
during which President Lederle pointed out that under eminent do- 
main a tender could be made and the courts would then litigate on 
cost. Meanwhile, the University would have the right to move in 
and start construction. 

Chairman Haigis read four votes recommended by the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds (Document T69-080) . The first 
vote embodied the concept or principle; the second vote dealt with 
the physical plan. The third vote had concern with the draft of 
legislation appropriating funds. Trustee Frechette said he hoped 
that this vote would incorporate the desirability of a special 
commission to oversee construction of the project. 

Chairman Healey summarized the views expressed. He 
stressed that every effort should be made to avoid road blocks in 
the BBC due to the great overload of work in that agency. If 
creation of a commission seems to be a feasible route which would 
fully protect the interests of the Commonwealth, it is a route that 
should be followed by the Board. 



3220 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
agreed that part three of the vote would appear to be broad enough 
to afford this flexibility. He then completed reading the fourth 
vote which instructed the administration to implement the plan with 
all speed. 

Motion was made and seconded and discussion was held 
during which the cost of the project was related to the numbers of 
students to be accommodated. After further comment, it was 

VOTED : . To.approve in principle the UM/Boston 
Master Plan to 1980, Document T69-080, 
which proposes 

(a) an enrollment of 15,000 by 1980, and 

(b) an organization of the campus into six 
colleges of 2,000 undergraduates and up 
to 500 graduate and professional stu- 
dents, with central library and natural 
science facilities. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the UM/Boston Master Plan.- Estimated 
space requirements, Document T69-062, which 
proposes 3,300,000 square feet of academic 
and related structures, or approximately 200 
gross square feet per student for facilities 
other than those which are to be self- 
amortizing, be approved as the basis for 
site planning and establishment of estimate 
of capital costs. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the draft of legislation appropriating 
. . funds and authorizing acquisition of land, 
planning and construction facilities at 
Columbia Point, Document T69-079, be approved 
and that the President be directed to trans- 
mit a copy of that legislation, together with 
a copy of the vote of the Trustees to the 
Governor of the Commonwealth for submission 
to the Great and General Court in this 1969 
legislative session. 

It was further 



VOTED : That the Board of Trustees instruct the ad- 
ministration of the University to implement 
. the plan with a sense or urgency commensurate 
with the need for higher educational facili- 
ties in the Commonwealth. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The report of the Committee on Finance was made by Chair- 
man Pumphret. The semi-annual review of the investment portfolio 
was held on June tenth. Investment Counsels Ladd and Wood of 
Standish, Ayer and Wood reviewed in depth the impact of the present 
"credit crunch." Their outlook in general was optimistic. 
Recommendations were made for some changes in the investment port- 
folio and discussion was held on appropriate courses of action. 

In accord with the recommendation of the committee, and 
on motion made and seconded, it was then 



VOTED : 



To authorize the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute 
the changes detailed herewith in orders 
in the University's investment portfolio 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer and 
Wood, Inc. 



Sell 

25M 
Buy 
25 M 

Sell 

300 
225 



Issue 



Approximate Market 
Price Value 



Federal Home Loan 6.30 6/25/69 $ 100 



Federal Home Loan 8's 6/26/70 



Clark Equipment 

First National Boston 
Total Sales 
Available Cash 



100 



$ 25,000 



25,000 



(1.40) 


38 


11,400 


n (2.90) 


76 


17,100 
$28,500 

55,981 
$84,481 



Buy. 

300 
700 
400 

40(1) 
500 



Continental Can 
Northwest Airlines 
Magnavox 

Baltimore Gas & Elec. 
Security Pacific 
Total Purchases 



(2.20) 


70 


$21,000 


(0.45) 


33 


23,100 


(1.20) 


49 


19,600 


(1.70) 


32 


1,280 


(1.28) 


39 


19,500 



$84,480 



(1) Subscription to Forthcoming 1 x 10 rights offering 



Chairman Pumphret next reported on creation of a de- 
velopment office. He asked President Lederle to describe the pro- 
posal. 

President Lederle stated that a $50,000 item has been 
included in the Trust Fund Budget to establish a Development Office 



3221 



Report of 
Committee 
on Finance 



Investment 
Portfolio 



Development 
Office 



3222 



TRUSTEE 



State 
Auditor' s 
Report 



Reports - 
Information 
on Budgets 
for Trustees 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student 
Activities 



WMUA - 

Broadcasting 

Council 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



on private funds, 
in the past. 



The Alumni have had a monopoly on fund raising 



Within recent months the Administration has been working 
with the alumni to restructure the University's fund raising 
approach, moving it to a broader base, with full tax exempt status 
and with continued alumni participation on a cooperative basis. 
The Finance Committee was alerted that this item would be in the 
Trust Fund Budget. More detailed negotiations will be entered into 
with the Associate Alumni after the office has been established. 

After consideration and in accord with the recommendation 
of the committee, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve creation of a Development 
Office. 

Chairman Pumphret referred to the State Auditor's report 
which had been distributed to the members of the Finance Committee. 
He said the report contained the kindest treatment the University 
has ever received. 

Discussion was held at the Finance Committee meeting on 
improved reporting of internal University budget expenditures. 
Sample reports were submitted by the Treasurer and it was agreed 
that quarterly reports would be acceptable. This should provide 
sufficient information to enable the members of the Board to keep 
current on the budgetary situation during the year. 

The report of the Committee on Student Activities was made 
by Chairman Lyons. This committee heard an issue between WMUA, the 
student radio station, and the University Broadcasting Council, on 
June 10. The result was the committee approved the recommendation 
of the Council and moved its acceptance. Chairman Lyons briefly 
explained the situation, referring to a summary sheet supplied by 
the Council (Document T69-089) . 

WMUA claims, and the Council concedes, that WMUA's campus 
coverage is inadequate. About one-third of the students living off 
campus do not receive the station despite the fact that $3.08 of the 
student tax goes for WMUA. The station management wishes to apply 
to the FCC for an increase in power from their present 10 to 1,000 
watts. This would permit their signal to reach all of the campus 
and adjacent areas, including many commuter students. It would 
probably reach also to Springfield and Greenfield. They also wish 
to transmit high fidelity stereo, which requires more power than 10 
watts. The University Broadcasting Council recommended against the 
increase at this time. They proposed instead that the station try 
a relocation of its antenna to higher ground, as recommended iman 
engineering survey. Engineering studies presented by both sides 
were in considerable conflict. The Council recommendation was based 
largely not on engineering questions but rather on policy; that is, 
permitting extension of the area coverage and scope of an under- 
graduate station into a substantial public area. 



3223 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Council proposed that a study group be appointed con- 
sisting of representatives of WMUA, the Council, the Administration 
and the Student Senate to explore the questions involved. 

Chairman Lyons reported that the committee was not in 
complete accord with either the Council's position or the readiness 
of WMUA to assume added responsibility. The unanimous vote of the 
committee underscored the importance of the proposed study and urgec 
that it be promptly undertaken so that the conflicts in policy 
questions can soon be resolved. An early report is hoped for. The 
matter was brought to the Trustees in advance of such a study due tc 
the student's sense of urgency that immediate consideration is 
needed. 

Chairman Lyons then moved that the recommendations of the 
University Broadcasting Council in respect to WMUA be accepted and 
that the Council be directed to proceed at the earliest with the 
proposed study. 

Mr. Lyons next alluded to a recent article in the Summer 
Statesman which supported the WMUA position, though no mention was 
made of stereo. The committee had indicated stereo was not a 
sufficient reason in itself to warrant an advance to 1,000 watts. 
Mr. Lyons said the situation calls for a more systematic advisory 
operation. This would give WMUA essentially the same status as the 
Collegian , and might meet the issue of responsibility. 

President Lederle denied that the Administration "did not 
feel the students were responsible," in running a station. He said 
that, under present organization, they are not now always 
responsible. Going to a wide public audience at higher power will 
require more full time talent. The station, under those circum- 
stances, cannot be run as a plaything by a few individuals. As 
part of any move to higher power, a budget should be presented 
which would provide for professional guidance: "someone to mind 
the shop." 

Secretary McCartney, Chairman of the University Broad- 
casting Council, stated, in going to 1,000 watts, the station be- 
comes in effect a regional station and a second voice of the Uni- 
versity. There are student stations of this size on other campuses 
but this move would dictate the need for more professional 
guidance. A second problem would be conforming to FCC standards at 
the time of increase: operating 12 months per year, etc. He re- 
ferred to Mrs. Rowland's suggestion at the committee meeting that 
the study should include consideration of whether or not the 
license for WMUA should move from the Board of Trustees to a 
separate corporation. 

Dr. Croce, a member of the committee, emphasized that the 
Board of Trustees holds the WMUA license. Should the station move 
from 10 to 1,000 watts, it becomes a different type of operation, 



3224 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



one that actually is using the public airways. This transcends the 
type of communication the Collegian represents as a campus newspaper 
because use of the public airways is involved and WMUA must conform 
to the standards of the FCC. Much more supervision would be 
necessary, he said, if the Board were in control of the station at 
1,000 watts. 

Chairman Lyons referred to the matter as one which re- 
quires a real study of all aspects. He stated that no action should 
be taken until there is a real study. 



After further comment, motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



VOTED : That the University Broadcasting Council 
be directed to set up an ad hoc committee 
which includes representatives of the 
Council, of WFCR, of WMUA and of the stu- 
dent senate to study the questions set 
forth in Document T69-089, and addi- 
tionally the question of whether the 
license for WMUA should be transferred 
from the Board of Trustees to a private 
corporation. 

The President submitted personnel actions, copies of which 
had been supplied in advance of the meeting to the members of the 
Board. After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Personnel 

Actions as detailed in Document T69-077, 
together with Supplement #1 and Supplement 
#1A, which documents are herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period May 31, 1969 to June 30, 1969 as 
detailed in Document T69-077A, which 
document is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now 
in effect as subsequently amended, re- 
vised, added to or repealed by the Board 
of Trustees with respect to professional 
personnel under provisions of Chapter 75 
of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification 
for each position to which a member of 
the professional staff is hereby appointed, 
promoted, transferred or determined shall 
be as hereafter determined by the Board of 
Trustees or under their authority. 

President Lederle noted that the Trust Fund Budget and 
the Operating Budget had been circulated. He stated that the 
Operating Budget has been cut back in terms of the original House 
5100. In the meantime, the Senate approved increases. The docu- 
ment which had to be prepared for July 1 will be changed to reflect 
these increases. However, there are no new programs. The budget 
generally is on the basis of a 107 o cut below the current appropria- 
tions level, pending possible supplementals . With reference to the 
Trust Fund Budget, the only policy change was the Development Office: 
referred to by Chairman Pumphret in his report of the Finance 
Committee. He then asked Provost Tippo to describe the proposed 
change in the fee for Physical Education. 

The Provost said that page 62 would now require a re- 
vised form. Delay had been occasioned because of negotiating with 
the students. The situation is that the fee requirement has been 
changed from two years to one year. He made the recommendation 
that freshmen be charged a lab fee of $10 per semester and that 
transfer students be charged $10 in their first semester. There 
will be no increase for any student. The President amplified the 
explanation noting that part of the difficulty was brought about in 
the change from a two-year to a one-year requirement in the Physi- 
cal Education program. 

He noted the fee will provide intramural and other backup 
material for a student through his final three years. The matter 
has been under extended discussion. Approval is required only on 
the revised substitute pages referring to the Athletic Trust Fund. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the revised Fiscal 1970 Trust 
Fund Budget as detailed in Document 
T69-078 which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

President Lederle referred to Document T69-081 (pages 1 
and 2), on the Graduate School Fee. The Provost informed the Board 
that this proposal provides for a reassessment of fees. Although 
it yields the same sort of income, the graduate students will be 
pleased with it. He referred to Mr. Yelton, President of the 
Graduate Student Senate, who agreed that this will be a better 
system. 



3225 



Trust 

Fund 

Budget 



Fee 

Change - 
Physical 
Education 



Trust 

Fund 

Budget 



Graduate 

School 

Fees 



;226 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED : To approve the change in the Graduate 
School fee as set out in Document 
T69-081. 



It was also 

VOTED : That effective with the fall semester 
1969, graduate students enrolled for 
five (5) or more credits shall pay a 
General Fee for such facilities and 
services as the Infirmary, Student 
Union, and I.D. card billed at the 
same rate as charged undergraduate 
students. The General Fee shall also 
include the Graduate Student Tax 
established by the Graduate Student 
Senate. A graduate student enrolled 
for four (4) credits or fewer shall 
pay a modified General Fee consisting 
of the standard charge for the I.D., 
the Graduate Student Tax, plus half 
the standard charge for the Student 
Union. The Infirmary Fee and attendant 
services shall be at the student's 
option. 

It was further 

VOTED : That effective with the fall semester 
1969, graduate students who are candi- 
dates for a degree, but not enrolled 
for any course credits, shall pay a 
Program Fee of $10.00 each semester 
.until graduation. If a student does 
not pay this fee, but later seeks re- 
admission, he shall pay the accumulated 
Program Fees plus a re-admission fee of 
$50.00. These fees shall be deposited 
to an account to be used to support the 
student services area of the Graduate 
School. 



Citation 

Trustee 

Emerson 



Chairman Healey informed the Board that former Trustee 
Fred Emerson has become Associate Commissioner of Public Works of 
the Commonwealth. He then read a citation which was unanimously 
adopted by the Trustees and will be transmitted to Mr. Emerson, as 
follows: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"The Board of Trustees herewith extends its 
deep appreciation for the long and dis- 
tinguished service of Fred C. Emerson as a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts since December, 1962. 
This period in the life of the University has 
witnessed its greatest growth in history, 
calling for the utmost dedication and public 
service. Mr. Emerson has given his time, 
energy and counsel unstintingly on behalf of 
the people of the Commonwealth. In particular, 
the Board expresses its thanks for the dis- 
tinguished leadership which he gave to the 
Committee on Government and University Rela- 
tions, one of the key agencies of the Board 
in dealing with the Governor, the Legislature 
and other public bodies in Massachusetts." 

Chairman Healey reported on a meeting held with Professor 
Joseph Marcus and representatives of the three groups working on thei 
study of reorganization of the total system structure. It was 
agreed that the best way to proceed is to allow Professor Marcus to 
spend next month doing basic research which would involve traveling 
to other state universities which have a system of organization. 
This will look to a meeting of the full committees of Boston, 
Worcester and Amherst sometime in late July or early August. It is 
clear that Professor Marcus is reporting to the Executive Committee 
which will be charged with the final responsibility for making 
recommendations with respect to system structure. The committees 
will operate in an advisory capacity and will be consulted at every 
stage in the development of the recommendation. Hopefully, the 
study will proceed as quickly as possible in accord with the wish 
of the Board. 

President Lederle then informed the Board of a candidate 
for the administrative staff at UM/Boston, whom the Chancellor has 
interviewed and recommended. He asked for authorization for the 
Executive Committee to interview the candidate so that a commitment 
can be made between now and the next Board meeting. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Executive Committee be given the 

power to appoint a high level administrator 
at UM/Boston prior to the next meeting of 
the Board of Trustees on August 11, 1969. 



The meeting was adjourned at 



p.m. 





McCal 
ard of Trustee 



3227 



Committee on 

Structural 

System 



UM/Boston 
Administrator 



3228 



TRUSTEE 



Approval of 
Minutes 



President ' s 
Comments 



Medical 
School 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
August 11, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Chandler, Croce, 
Gordon, Knowles, Lyons, Plimpton, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Sullivan, Sweig, 
Troy, Weldon. 



Chancellor Broderick, Dean Soutter, 
Provost Tippo, Associate Treasurer 
Brand, Business Manager Grady, Dean 
Shapiro, Budget Director Morrell, 
Acting Dean Gagnon, Vice Chancellor 
for Fiscal Affairs Roy Hamilton, 
UM/B, Professor Ryan, UM/B; also, 
Mrs. Burn, Miss Tillona, Messrs. T. 
Burke, Emerson, Norton; Mr. Melley, 
Miss Coulter. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Healey convened the meeting 
at 2:00 p.m. He welcomed the Commissioner of Education, Dr. Neil 
Sullivan, to his first Board meeting. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circu- 
lated and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees for June 30, 1969. 

The Chairman invited President Lederle' s comments. The 
President stated he would ask the Dean of the Medical School to re- 
port on the progress of that school and would then ask Chancellor 
Broderick to report on the status of the UM/Boston campus at 
Columbia Point. The budget for the Amherst campus will be discussed 
by Provost Tippo. 

Dean Soutter reported that advance planning for the 
Medical School and hospital was moving well. Site work is expected 
to begin in September. Phase I of construction which will include 
grading and excavation of the area for the power plant is scheduled 
for completion by January 1, 1970. Phase II, the excavation for 
the medical science building, is expected to be completed by 
May 1, 1970. Phase III, completion of excavation for the hospital, 
is scheduled for July 1, 1970. The Dean advised that the estimated 
cost of the site work, which is budgeted as part of the project 
cost for the medical science building, would be $2,500,000. 



3229 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Soutter stated plans for the Shaw Building will be 
complete by October 1, 1969. Review by the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction and appropriate University staff should be completed and 
the project ready for bid by October 15. It is expected that con- 
struction will begin November 1, 1969 and be completed by May 1, 
1970. The cost of construction is estimated at $1,200,000 and the 
cost of equipping will be approximately $360,000. This will pre- 
pare the building for the first class to enter in the fall of 1970. 
However, additional funds will be required for further construction 
and equipping for the second year class the following year. 

The construction schedule as of August 11, 1969 in- 
corporating target dates for site work and other construction was 
fully detailed in Document T70-013 supplied to the members of the 
Board at the meeting. 

The Dean briefly reviewed the construction schedule for 
the power plant and utility tunnel. Plans are expected to be ready 
by November 3. Construction is scheduled to begin January 5, 1970 
and completed by April 5, 1971. The cost of this project is 
budgeted under the medical science building and is approximately 
$7,104,112. 

Plans for the medical science building are expected to 
be completed by the end of December and will go out to bid by 
February 20, 1970. Construction is scheduled to begin May 1, 1970 
and be completed by May 1, 1973. The building will be equipped by 
September of that year and ready for occupancy. Construction and 
fixed equipment fees, and movable equipment total approximately 
$52,911,888. 

The University of Massachusetts hospital plans will be 
complete by March 20, 1970 and after review by the Bureau of Build- 
ing Construction, H.E.W. (Boston and Washington) and the University 
will go out to bid by May 1, 1970. Construction is scheduled to 
begin by July 1, 1970 and to be completed by January 1, 1973. The 
building will be equipped and ready for occupancy by September 1, 
1973, at a total cost of $62,333,000. 

The Dean noted that the site work and the power plant are 
budgeted under the medical science building. He said if the 
hospital's share were allocated to it, the project cost of the 
hospital would be $67,132,056. 



The additional funds added to the budget, with that 
carried over from the previous year, will be sufficient to move ahead 
and get the school started. 

Recruitment of faculty has begun again and the Dean ex- 
pressed optimism that it would be complete by July, 1970. 



Shaw 
Building 



Power Plant 
and Utility 
Tunnel -- 
Worcester 



Medical 
Science 
Building 



U of M 
Hospital 



3230 



TRUSTEE 

Ceremonies 



Columbia 

Point 

Construction 



Amherst 
Budget 



Overall 

Pay 

Increase 



Report of 

Executive 

Committee 

Honorary 

Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Soutter advised that 1300 inquiries from students 
about entry have been received. No out-of-state students will be 
included in the first class of students. When the office opens in 
September it is estimated that approximately 600 senior applications 
from Massachusetts residents and non-residents will be received. 

The Dean invited suggestions from the Trustees as to 
appropriate recognition of the various milestones in the medical 
school construction progress. He referred to the selection of dates 
beginning with September 3, 1969, start of construction at site, 
through other salient dates, as shown on document supplies (T70-013) 

Chancellor Broderick reported on the status of the bill 
initiating construction of the campus at Columbia Point. This was 
the subject of a message from the Governor to the Legislature. 

It is anticipated that action will be completed before the 
Legislature prorogues. The Chancellor noted that, although $150 
million had been requested by the University for completion of site 
work and construction for the first 5,000 students at Columbia 
Point, only $50 million will be authorized by the bill. As a result 
it will be necessary to request additional sums as they are needed. 
Although the Governor and Commissioner Dwight have indicated their 
desire to cooperate, no provision was included in the bill for by- 
passing the various state agencies in order to expedite the building 
program. 

Provost Tippo advised that the 1971 budget for Amherst is 
in preparation and will be ready for action in September. In accord 
with the request of the Executive Committee separate schedules are 
in preparation based on (1) present enrollment and (2) increased 
enrollment (1500 students) which will enable the Board to arrive at 
certain policy decisions. The Provost stated that $9.9 million had 
been requested in the supplemental budget for Amherst, but the 
Governor has recommended only $360,000. In the capital budget sub- 
mitted by the Governor, Amherst fared reasonably well with appro- 
priations for an arts and sciences building, infirmary addition, 
equipment for Graduate Research Center and roads. However, the sum 
of $500,000 so essential for books for the library was not included 
This means that this account will be $500,000 less than a year ago. 

President Lederle then informed the Board of the problem 
of implementing the recent overall pay increase. He advised that 
the money to support the increase is included in the supplemental 
authorization bill currently before the Legislature. He agreed to 
keep the Board informed on this matter. Discussion was held on the 
areas affected by the supplemental budget. 

The Chairman reported that the Executive Committee held a 
meeting to consider honorary degrees for 1970 and that preliminary 
screening is in process. Another meeting will be held soon. 
Definite recommendations will then be submitted to the full Board. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey stated that Professor Marcus, staff 
coordinator for the Executive Committee on matters of system re- 
organization of the University, has been working diligently. He 
has submitted several reports to the Executive Committee, copies of 
which will be made available to all Trustees. 

Chairman Healey expressed the hope that in September the 
Executive Committee and the Board could come to grips with some of 
the policy decisions inherent with reorganization. He reported 
that the Executive Committee has held preliminary meetings on se- 
lection of a successor to the President and that he would appoint 
an ad hoc committee to proceed as expeditiously as possible. 

President Lederle gave the report of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds in the absence of the Chairman and Acting 
Chairman of that committee. In accord with the minutes of the meet 
ing held August 6, copies of which had been circulated, a 
recommendation was made to adopt a redraft of the motor vehicle 
regulations for the Amherst campus (Document T70-012) . After 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts acting under the 
powers granted by Section 32A, Chapter 75, 
General Laws of the Commonwealth, adopt, 
subject to subsequent amendment or re- 
vision, the rules and regulations for the 
use and operation of vehicles used in and 
about the campus of the University and on 
other lands of the University, as set forth 
in Document T70-012 attached hereto and 
made a part of these minutes. 

The committee considered the appointment of employees as 
parking control officers (Chapter 320, Acts of 1969; effective 
May 21, 1969) which strikes out section 10F of Chapter 147 of GL 
and substitutes the following: 

10F Appointment of Parking Control Officers 

Any board or officer authorized to appoint 
police officers in any city or town which 
accepts this section, and any college, uni- 
versity or other educational institution em- 
powered by law to make or establish rules or 
regulations regulating the parking of motor 
vehicles, may appoint parking control officers 
who shall have only those powers and duties 
conferred or imposed on police officers by 
section twenty A of twenty C of chapter 
ninety. 



3231 



Ad Hoc 

Committee for 
Selecting a 
President 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 



Motor 

Vehicle 

Regulations 



Parking 
Control 
Officers 



3232 



TRUSTEE 



Tuition 
Waiver 

Lowell 
Tech. Inst. 

and 
Southeastern 
Mass. Univ. 



Honors 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Section 20A of Chapter 90 is concerned with the ticket- 
issuing authority and responsibility of police officers in general 
and Section 20C with the same subject in Boston and Cambridge. 

The President stated this legislation is of great interest 
to the University and outlined the plan to assign this limited 
police function to positions already in the Security Department, 
already assigned to parking control. He noted it may be necessary 
from time to time to confer this authority temporarily on other 
employees, for example during football weekends. He stated the in- 
tent is not to create new positions or titles, but to accept and 
exercise a degree of authority given by the Legislature. 

After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it wa 

VOTED : That the authority granted concerning park- 
ing control officers, as provided by 
Chapter 147, Section 10F of the General 
Laws, be exercised by those employees of 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
who are so designated by the President of 
the University. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was made by Chairman Troy. He reviewed the policy es- 
tablished by the Board to waive tuition costs for community college 
and state college faculty members wishing to take courses at the 
University and submitted the recommendation that this be extended to 
include two other educational institutions: Lowell Technological 
Institute and the former Southeastern Massachusetts Technological 
Institute, now the Southeastern Massachusetts University. 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : That the President be authorized to waive 
tuition, but not fees, for faculty members 
of the Lowell Technological Institute and 
Southeastern Massachusetts University who 
take courses at the University of Massa- 
chusetts, provided that the faculty members 
are full time before taking such courses 
and provided further that they return to full- 
time teaching at their respective institu- 
tions after completion of course work at the 
University of Massachusetts. 

Chairman Troy reported that new programs proposed by the 
College of Arts and Sciences included a four-year honors program 
(Document T70-001) . The program would be administered by a 
director, who would be aided by a small committee of faculty members 
from various disciplines. The staff would include faculty honors 
advisers who would be responsible for as many as 12 honors students 



3233 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

each. As the program progresses, it will include junior and senior 
seminars of an interdisciplinary nature. The Provost and the Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences support the proposal for this 
program. The present honors program would operate harmoniously 
with the proposed program. Professor E. H. Emerson responded to 
question. He stated that students could be admitted to the program 
up to the junior year. 

After discussion and comment, motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To approve the honors program for the 
College of Arts and Sciences (Document 
T70-001). 

A proposed major in Italian language and literature was 
considered and recommended by the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy. Chairman Troy stated an Italian program has been 
offered for many years; there is a competent department and the de- 
mand has increased. The proposal includes the addition of seven 
new courses in Italian literature and the institution of an under- 
graduate major in Italian language and literature (Document T70-002 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the proposal for a major in 
Italian language and literature in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at the 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst, 
as set out in Document T70-002. 

A proposal for an undergraduate major in geography which 
would provide a broad introduction to the methods, materials and 
concepts of the discipline was reviewed by Chairman Troy. The pro- 
gram would provide a solid core of the study in geography and in- 
clude a course in a directly related cognate field other than 
geography. Students would be encouraged to use course selections 
to reinforce their geographic ability and attain a multi-discipli- 
nary appreciation of problems and regions of specific interest to 
them. It was proposed that Botany 226 and Geology 360 be accepted 
as meeting departmental requirements. 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To approve an undergraduate major in 
geography at UM/Amherst as set forth 
in Document T70-003. 

Chairman Troy briefly described the proposal submitted by 
Dean Conlon of the School of Business Administration to introduce 
a graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Science in 
Management Science at UM/Amherst (Document T70-004) . This program 
would bring technical skills and an understanding of management 



Italian 
Lang. & Lit. 
UM/Amherst 

Under- 
graduate 
Major 



Under- 
graduate 
Major in 
Geography 



M.S. in 
Management 
Science 
UM/Amherst 



3234 



TRUSTEE 



Master of 
Arts in 
Art History 
UM/ Amherst 



Summer 

French 

Language 

Program 

Pau 



Summer 

German 

Language 

Program 

Abroad 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

problems together. Dean Conlon stated a master's degree in manage- 
ment science would be a logical extension of the undergraduate 
quantitative methods major and would complement the Ph.D. program 
by dual use of courses. 

After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the graduate program leading 
to the degree of Master of Science in 
Management Science at UM/ Amherst (Docu- 
ment T70-004) . 

The Chairman said that Professor Norton presented a pro- 
posal to the committee for the degree of Master of Arts in Art 
History (Document T70-005) . A graduate program leading to the 
master of fine arts degree is established, but no such provision 
exists for the art history student. The proposed program would 
encourage a balanced growth in visual arts within the University 
and would serve the needs of the larger academic community as well 
as the state and national area. Faculty and other resources are 
adequate to support an M.A. program. Expansion of established 
museums, the founding of new museums and the rising demand for 
public art courses, amorjg other factors, has created an increased 
demand for art history teachers. Chairman Troy stated the depart- 
ment has competent scholars in this area and resources are adequate 
to support the proposed program. The Chairman gave assurance that 
there was no proliferation of degrees. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the proposal for the degree 
of Master of Arts in Art History (Docu- 
ment T70-005) . 

Three proposals presented by Dr. Burn, director of inter- 
national programs, were summarized by Chairman Troy. He described 
the proposal for a summer program in French, at Pau (Document T70- 
006) . He referred to the enthusiasm of the students for the Paris 
program as evidenced in correspondence and stated that the six-week 
study program in Pau would also serve the students in other valley 
colleges, since it is the only available program in the French 
language. Courses will be available at the upper-division and 
graduate levels, with flexibility of selection according to indivi- 
dual need. Elementary six credit course of study is available, ad- 
ministered by the University Center at Pau. Cost to the student is 
minimal, though facilities and quality are described as outstanding, 
The group will be coordinated with travel abroad of other study 
groups of the University. One faculty member will accompany the 
group to assure proper functioning of the University program. 

The proposal for an eight week summer German language pro- 
gram at Freiberg (Document T70-007) offers an opportunity for stu- 
dents to strengthen their German so that participation in the full 
program at Freiburg would be facilitated. Anthropology students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



doing work in Germany would benefit by the additional language pro- 
ficiency gained from this course. The program would utilize the 
facilities and staff assistance of the Atlantic Studies Institute 
in Freiburg. A member of the Department of German has been desig- 
nated as director. He will accompany the group and be responsible 
for supervision and administration of the program. 

Chairman Troy said the proposed exchange program with the 
New University of Ulster in Northern Ireland (Document T70-008) 
gave the committee pause. Some wondered why a more liberal area 
was not selected; others were concerned because of the discontents. 
Question was also raised as to the value of the educational ex- 
perience in a new, remote project. However, it was said it would 
provide foreign experience without the need for facility with 
foreign language. The program involves only one semester at a 
modest cost of $100. The committee decided to recommend approval 
of the program, appending the condition that the program be care- 
fully evaluated after one year and report made to the Board of 
Trustees. The Chairman noted that the students were attending a 
University which must include within it what is best and most 
promising in that troubled land. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the Proposal for a Summer French 
Language Program Abroad (Document T70-006) ; 
a Proposal for Summer German Language Pro- 
gram Abroad (Document T70-007) ; and Proposal 
for Exchange Program at the New University 
of Ulster, Northern Ireland (Document T70-008) . 

Trustee Knowles suggested that Professor Norton become 
involved in the Pau program, in connection with art history. 

In response to query, Provost Tippo stated that an annual 
report had been prepared on all overseas programs, copy of which 
will be supplied to each member of the Board of Trustees. 

With reference to non-proliferation, an annual report has 
been prepared which will show courses added and courses dropped. 
This, too, will be furnished to members of the Board. 

Chairman Troy noted that the University is under the norm 
of courses offered and cited the example of the University of 
Wisconsin. 

Professor Glen Gordon, secretary of the Faculty Senate, 
spoke to the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee on a resolu- 
tion passed by that body, the essence of which was that the faculty 
should be more involved in policy making at all levels. Chairman 
Troy stated the whole problem would be considered later and the 
Executive Committee will be involved in the considerations. 



3235 



New 

University 
of Ulster, 
Northern 
Ireland 



Overseas 
Programs - 
Annual Report 

Non-prolifera- 
tion - 
Annual Report 



3236 



TRUSTEE 



Leonardo 
da Vinci 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Troy then described a proposal to divide the 
College of Arts and Sciences and have separate deans, due to the 
size of the school. This tentative report presented by Acting 
Dean Shapiro will be presented. in more detail when available. A 
ballot of faculty members in May resulted in vote of 65% for re- 
organization of the college. The progress report indicated that 
537o voted for the three college plan as opposed to an alternative 
plan for four colleges or six colleges. 

President Lederle briefly reviewed the situation with 
reference to the da Vinci papers, and the agreement to produce a 
scholarly edition. Subsequent events indicate that the popular 
edition will be four volumes in length and will be fairly scholarly. 
As a result there is no great purpose in producing the critical 
edition. In order to terminate the arrangement a formal vote is 
required, authorizing the President to do so. Accordingly, after 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

i ■ ■ i 'i 
VOTED : That because the University and the Spanish 
authorities concur that it is no longer 
practicable or desirable for the University 
of Massachusetts to undertake, prepare, 
publish, or otherwise produce in any way a 
critical or other edition of the Mss. of 
Leonardo da Vinci, entitled "Treatises on 
Statics and Mechanics" (Tratados de estatica 
y mecanica) and "Various Treatises on Forti- 
fication, Statics and Geometry" (Tratados 
varios de fortif icacion, estatica y geometria) 
which are preserved in the Biblioteca 
Nacional de Madrid under the signatures of 
8936 and 8937, and all as set forth in agree- 
ments dated May 2, 1967 and May 19, 1967 be- 
tween Dr. Edward C. Moore in the name of the 
University of Massachusetts and D. Eleuterio 
Gonzalez Zapatero in the name of the Ministry 
of Education and Science, of Spain; therefore, 
President Lederle is authorized to do those 
acts and to execute in the name of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts those instruments 
which will terminate any and all obligations 
of the University to so prepare, publish, or 
otherwise produce such editions. 

The President submitted the Personnel Actions which had 
been circulated previously to the Board. After due consideration 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Personnel Actions 
as detailed in Document T70-010, together 
with Supplements #1, #2 and #3, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period July 1, 1969 to August 11, 1969 
as detailed in Document T70-010A, to- 
gether with Supplement #1A, which docu- 
ments are herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be sub- 
ject to the policies and procedures now in 
effect as subsequently amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees with respect to professional per- 
sonnel under provisions of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and 
descriptive job specification for each 
position to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, trans- 
ferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

It was then 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 

President Lederle referred to the Pay Authorization Bill 
now stating there were some matters still before the General Court 
for clarification. He suggested it would be expedient to authorize 
the Executive Committee to act, since the next meeting of the full 
Board would not be held until September. Accordingly, after con- 
sideration of the resolution circulated to the members present, 
motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : In conformity with the provisions of Section 
14 of Chapter 75 of the General Laws, as 
amended, and the provisions of Chapter 635 
of the Acts of 1966 and the authority con- 
tained therein and all other acts applicable 



3237 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Classification 
of Position 
Title 



Pay 
Raise 



3238 



Death of 
Trustee 

Brown 

Report of 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

thereto, each person on the professional and 
non-professional staff paid from state funds 
shall receive an increase in pay and retro- 
active payment as provided in Chapter 547 
of the Acts of 1969; and provided that the 
provisions of Chapter 547 of the Acts of 1969 
shall be applied in like manner to all pro- 
fessional and non-professional staff paid 
from other than state funds provided, however, 
that in the case of those paid from institute, 
grant, or contract funds such payment shall 
be subject to the recommendation of the 
principal investigator or director of the 
project and his certification of the avail- 
ability of funds to cover the cost of the in- 
crease; furthermore, the Board of Trustees 
hereby delegates to the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees its authority to 
take whatsoever action it considers appro- 
priate concerning any legislation relating 
to Chapter 547 of 1969 which may become 
effective between August 11, 1969 and the 
date of the next regular Trustee meeting; and 
the Board of Trustees directs the President 
of the University to apply the provisions of 
Chapter 547 of the Acts of 1969, and any 
amendments thereto at such time and in such 
manner as he shall deem necessary for the 
good of the University. 

The death of former Trustee Harry Brown was noted with 
regret. The President attended memorial services for Trustee Brown 
and conveyed the sympathy of the Board to Mrs. Brown. 

Trustee Lyons, the representative to the Board of Higher 
Education, reported that no meeting of that Board was held this 
month. The committee seeking a new Chancellor for the Board has 
not yet made a recommendation. 

Discussion was held on the proposal pending before the 
Governor and Legislature that a student should be a member of the 
Board of Trustees. Trustee Lyons was appointed Chairman of an ad 
hoc committee to bring in a recommendation as to what position the 
Board should take. (The current view, indicates that the Board 
should take no action.) Trustee Lyons stated that these matters 
were mentioned merely for information. He asked that any pronounced 
views be communicated to him. 



The meeting was ad jo 



at 2:45 p.m. 




Robe,,! 
Secretai 




t J. McCai 
Board of Tru£ 



ees 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 12, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Sheraton-Boston Hotel, 

Boston, Mass. 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Chandler, Croce, 
Frechette, Greenblatt, Haigis, Knowles, 
Maginnis, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Snowden, Troy and Weldon; Secretary 
McCartney, Treasurer Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



I 



I 



Provost Tippo, Assistant Dean of Ad- 
ministration Gugin, Dean Field, Pro- 
fessor Korson, Faculty Senate Repre- 
sentative; Student Senate President 
Balboni, Student Senate Vice-Presi- 
dent Cynthia Olken; Miss Beharry, 
Student Senate Representative; Mr. 
Melley, UM/ Amherst; Chancellor 
Broderick, Dean Gagnon, Planning 
Officer O'Brien, UM/Boston; Pietro 
Belluschi, Architectural Consultant; 
Messrs. Sasaki, Minervino and 
Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Inc.; and members of 
the press. 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Healey convened the meet- 
ing at 2:25 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circula- 
ted and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of the 
Board of Trustees for August 11, 1969. 

Chairman Healey called for the President's comments. 
President Lederle announced that more than 18,000 students are ex- 
pected in the final enrollment tally on the Amherst campus this 
year, although the University has been budgeted for 17,335. At 
UM/Boston the final fall enrollment is expected to total slightly 
more than 3,500 students. 

The President reflected satisfaction with the capital out 
lay appropriations for UM/Amherst; also for the Worcester campus. 
He expressed the hope that no additional escalation in construction 
costs would occur. He noted that $50,000,000 was made available 
for UM/Boston, and that the clear need exists to remain on schedule 



3239 



Approval of 
Minutes 

President' s 
Comments 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Boston 
Master Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for construction of all of these projects and facilities. In 
particular, he noted that we must push forward diligently in order 
to bring buildings on line in time to take an additional 1,500 stu- 
dents on the Amherst campus. President Lederle invited the 
Chancellor to comment on the Boston campus. Chancellor Broderick 
again took note of the $50,000,000 appropriation for construction 
on the UM/Boston Columbia Point campus, with a maximum ceiling set 
at $355,000,000. The $50,000,000 figure is a capital outlay appro- 
priation for the current year. He told the Board that a request 
had been made to bypass normal state procedures in order to speed 
up construction of facilities; however, the Governor and the Legis- 
lature were unwilling to accede. The Governor had requested a 
study of an appropriate transportation link to the Columbia Point 
campus, but this item was deleted by the Legislature leaving us for 
the present without definite forward progress on such a facility. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Mr. Kay Alexander of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates presented a brief slide show and 
summary of the Development Concept for the UM/Boston campus at 
Columbia Point. 

Mr. Alexander noted that there was a six-step process in 
developing the master plan. Four steps have been completed, repre- 
senting approximately one-third of the total work. Currently, the 
consultants are in the development concept stage. The next step 
will be to provide more detail on this for the master plan. 

Slides were displayed. Mr. Alexander commented that the 
attempt was to review buildings projected in the light of the 
academic plan, and then progress to two, then to three dimensional 
programs through 1980. 

The study includes three dimensional relationships among 
the colleges some of which will be three levels from the pedestrian 
concourse. The relation between elements of the University itself 
have been explored. There will be a large parking demand related 
to academic space. It is planned to have approximately 76 acres of 
building space on one level, with five to six-story buildings. The 
"green area" will total approximately 70 acres, 20 of which will be 
a filled area. On the balance of the site, containing land po- 
tentially available in the future, 20 acres are taken up by the 
pumping station and 40 acres by Boston College High School. 

Mr. Minervino discussed the basic elements of the Univer- 
sity proper. These consisted of: 

a. community oriented facilities: administration 
building, fine arts, field house, etc. on the 
west quadrant 

b. core facilities: library and science areas 

c. the colleges themselves 



1 



TRUSTEE 



3241 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

d. entrance on a six- lane highway from 
Morrissey Boulevard; also the transit 
link 

The plans showed two college clusters at the south, east 
and north quadrants built around a central core containing the 
library and science areas. There was a central parking area to the 
northwest, and additional parking areas adjacent to the several 
colleges. Red lines showed the internal pedestrian circulation be- 
tween the colleges. A block model slide was displayed showing that 
the number of stories to the buildings is pretty well dictated by 
the sub-surface conditions and limits imposed by the flight approach 
pattern to Logan International Airport. A motion by Chairman 
Haigis of the Buildings and Grounds Committee was seconded, and it 
was then 

VOTED : To accept the basic concept of the pre- 
liminary plan for the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston Columbia Point site as 
prepared by the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, Inc. 

It was also 

VOTED : That upon the recommendation of Chancellor 
Broderick, Vice-chancellor William R. 
Hamilton, Jr., University of Massachusetts, 
Boston, be and hereby is authorized to enter 
into an agreement, or agreements, on behalf 
of this Board for the purpose of obtaining 
fair and accurate appraisals of the value 
of lands and appurtenances within the 
boundaries of the Columbia Point site as 
established by law. 

It was also 

VOTED : That Vice-Chancellor William R. Hamilton, 
Jr. , be and hereby is authorized to enter 
an agreement or agreements on behalf of the 
Board for the purpose of obtaining accurate 
surveys of the boundaries of all parcels of 
land within the boundaries of the Columbia 
Point site as established by law. 

After brief further discussion, it was also moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the following three firms of 
appraisers : 

Grush of R. M. Bradley & Co., Inc. 

Singer of Singer Associates 

Cary of Leggat, McCall & Werner, Inc. 



3242 



Report of 
Committee 
on Student 
Activities 



Picketing 



Report of 
the Building 
Authority 



Operating 
Budget 
Request - 
Fiscal 1971 



Provost 
Tippo's 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rowland, Chairman pro tem, presented the report 
of the Committee on Student Activities. She noted that the 
committee had met on Monday and that some of their work was un- 
finished. A further report will be made at an early meeting of the 
Board of Trustees. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the proposed Student Senate picketing 
code be referred to the Faculty and Student 
Senates with the suggestion that a joint 
commission be established to resolve the 
differences, and that any proposed changes 
be referred to the two Senates and eventually 
to the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Pumphret of the Building Authority reported that 
the legislation to authorize the purchase of the Student Union by 
the University Building Authority did not pass. At present, con- 
struction of the Campus Center is moving very well; approximately 
857o is completed. The so-called 1970 dormitories being constructed 
on Eastman Lane are approximately \TL ahead of schedule. 

Mr. Pumphret commented on the difficulties of floating 
bond issues in the current money market. He noted that the Univer- 
sity currently must pay 6.9% for three months; 7%% for six months. 

Chairman Healey requested the President to present the 
Operating Budget for. 1971. 

President Lederle noted that details are in the document 
(T70-022) which has been circulated to the Trustees. He said he 
would call upon Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick and in the 
absence of Dean Soutter, Associate Dean Saunders to comment on the 
request for Amherst, Boston and Worcester respectively. 

Provost Tippo stated that $59,000,000 is being requested 
in the Operating Budget for Amherst for the next fiscal year. The 
base maintenance budget amounts to $52,981,000. Certain special 
requests make up the difference. He called attention to page 6 of 
the budget document which shows the basic budget in column 1, then 
a column displaying fixed increases which the University would have 
to meet regardless of whether or not additional students are a 
accepted, e.g. $4,800,000 because we must convert some positions 
from 10 months to 12 months; certain mandatory step increases will 
be required, etc. Also, we have additional buildings, therefore 
close to $1,000,000 is listed for heating, etc. The sum of 1.4 
million dollars will be needed because of inflation. 

There is a most important column on the matter of enroll- 
ment increases. Presently, we are increasing by 1,500 students per 
year on the Amherst campus. For this purpose, the sum of $3,316,000 
is required. The final column displayed funds requested for 
supporting services, items needed as a "catch up factor." The 



3243 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Provost observed that the University has slipped behind on educa- 
tional supplies, library support, etc. over the past few budgets. 

Provost Tippo said that the principal issue is 
whether the University should continue to take an additional 1,500 
students each year. This major policy matter will be discussed by 
the Board over the next few weeks. He called attention to the fact 
that the budget is prepared in a "divided" manner; that is, 
figures are shown in terms of the present enrollment; and addi- 
tional sums are listed in the event that the Board of Trustees 
approves the addition of another 1,500 students. 

On new projects, the Provost stated that requests are in 
the budget for appropriations for a Law School; also for the 
Library, where support is badly needed. He pointed out that, 
during the current year, we have $500,000 less in Library appro- 
priations than were available last year. The sum of 1.2 million 
dollars is being requested for this purpose. The lag in equipment 
appropriations is also becoming cumulative, so the budget contains 
an equipment request of 1 million dollars. 

Vice-chancellor Hamilton commented on the UM/Boston bud- 
get request for 1971. The focus, he said, is on three problems. 
It is necessary to plan and build phase I of a University to take 
5,000 students by the fall of 1972; also, there is a need to ex- 
pand the Park Square campus enrollment by 500 students to a level 
of approximately 4,000 by the fall of 1970. Additionally, there is 
great need for an increase in supporting staff and for the 
equipping of classrooms which presently are not properly provided 
even for 3,500 students. The focus, he said, would be on: 
1. personnel, 2. equipment. 

"We need an additional $1,000,000 for the next fiscal 
year to properly and adequately staff the campus of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston, "Mr. Hamilton continued. "One of the 
highlights of the request is that we must generate specifications 
for a $150,000,000 campus at Columbia Point, and we now have two 
persons and a secretary to handle the project. On this basis, we 
cannot continue to administer effectively and provide proper 
support for the faculty and staff. The appropriations must be in- 
creased." 

The equipment item represents another $1,000,000, Mr. 
Hamilton continued. Basically, science labs at UM/Boston are in- 
adequately equipped at the present time to meet accreditation 
standards. 

Speaking for the University of Massachusetts School of 
Medicine budget request for 1971 was Associate Dean Saunders. 
Dr. Saunders pointed out that the budget speaks for itself and re- 
flects the needs of opening the School by the fall of 1970, when 
the first class will be accepted. He pointed out that there are 



Vice- 
chancellor 
Hamilton' s 
Comments 



Associate 
Dean 

Saunders ' 
Comments 



3244 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

two major categories in the budget requirements for the next fiscal 
year: 1. faculty, 2. equipment. 

Dr. Saunders stressed that the School of Medicine had been 
delayed by the study made earlier this year, and the time must now 
be made up. There will be extensive recruitment of faculty during 
the next twelve months. He observed that equipment for a medical 
school is very expensive, and that procurement must start from 
scratch at Worcester. He expressed appreciation for the $70,000 
appropriation for library books, and stated that the acquisition of 
volumes is going very nicely. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the University of Massachusetts 
Operating Budget Request for the Fiscal 
Year 1971 as detailed in Document T70-022, 
which document is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

The President next presented Personnel Actions which had 
been circulated to the Board in advance of the meeting. 



was 



After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it 



VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T70-014, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 
Appointments Without Tenure, for the 
period August 12, 1969 to September 12, 
1969, as detailed in Document T70-014A, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary- 
range and descriptive job specification for each 
position to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, transferred 
or determined shall be as hereafter determined by 
the Board of Trustees or under their authority. 



II 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle called upon Treasurer Johnson to 
comment on a vote required to implement the recent 127o cost-of- 
living increase voted for all state employees by the Legislature. 

The Treasurer stated that Chapter 777 provides authoriza- 
tion for the University to give increases to the professional staff 
However, a vote of the Board of Trustees is needed to implement 
this. He noted that, in applying the increases, there is some 
opportunity for discretion. 

The Treasurer outlined the application of the cost-of- 
living increase as follows: • 

a. Payments shall be retroactive to December 
29, 1968. The sums to be paid in the last 
fiscal year ended on June 28, 1969. They 
apply to everyone employed on subsidiary 
accounts 01 and 02. 

b. The application for the current year, 
starting July 1, is not discretionary. 
Therefore, persons entering the service of 
the University after June 29, 1969 will not 
receive a 127o increase over any salary rate 
previously fixed by the Board of Trustees. 

c. The 127o increase is figured on the base pay 
received as of December 28, 1968. (For 
example, no summer salary earnings will be 
figured in, etc.) . 

d. The Board of Trustees also authorized the 
award of merit increases last February. 
The cost-of-living increase legislation 
does not permit adding any merit increases 
to the base, prior to calculating the 127. 
increase. 

e. The statute requires Trustee authorization 
before any payments can be made to any other 
University employees, such as trust fund em- 
ployees and excepting research employees work- 
ing on federal grants. (Payments to research 
employees will require approval of the 
principal investigator) . 

Trustee Greenblatt inquired what the procedure might be 
in the event that some research accounts might have funds available 
and others might not. The Treasurer responded that the salary to 
be paid to any employee under a federal research grant is specified, 
and also must come back to the Trustees for approval. In the event 
that sufficient sums were not available in the grant to provide for 



3245 



Cost-of- 

Living 

Increase 



3246 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a 12% increase, the federal agency involved might authorize the in- 
crease and provide funds for same. 



Professor Korson inquired whether a co 
has been included in the legislation to provide 
The Treasurer responded that section 2a of Chapt 
earlier in the year with a cost-of-living increa 
by the Consumer Price Index. The increase would 
index rose 37o. Also, a decrease in salary would 
the index dipped by 37o. It will be necessary to 
this legislation is applicable to professionals 
The present consensus is that it does. 



st-of-living factor 
for future inflation 
er 547 did pass 
se to be determined 
be applied when the 
be involved when 
determine whether 
in the University. 



President Lederle noted that, despite the provisions of 
this act, it will still be necessary for the Legislature to appro- 
priate funds for the purpose. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of section 14 
of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended, 
and the provisions of Chapter 777 of the Acts of 
1969 and the authority contained therein and all 
other acts applicable thereto each officer and 
member of the professional staff of the University 
of Massachusetts employed in a position paid in 
whole or in part from state funds under subsidiary 
accounts designated 01 and 02 shall for the period 
beginning December 29, 1968 have the rate of his 
regular compensation otherwise paid or payable on 
December 29, 1968 increased by an amount not to 
exceed twenty dollars per week or twelve percent, 
whichever is greater, and such increase shall also 
be applied to the regular compensation of each 
such new employee entering the employ of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts during the period be- 
ginning December 29, 1968 and ending June 28, 1969 
but such increase shall not be applied to any 
salary rate previously fixed by vote of the Trustees 
for any such new employee entering the service of 
the University of Massachusetts on or after June 
29, 1969, provided that all such increases shall 
be computed on the regular compensation paid or 
payable before any merit or other increase in 
regular compensation voted by the Trustees and 
applicable during said period has been added and 
this increase shall not be construed in any manner 
that would deny such merit or other increase, if 
any, previously fixed by vote of the Trustees, 
provided further, that no increase on account of 
the provisions in said Chapter 777 shall be applied 
to summer teaching salaries or other extra compensa- 
tion previously authorized by vote of the Trustees, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and that the President of the University is here- 
by authorized to take all actions necessary or de- 
sirable to implement this Act and to also apply an 
increase not to exceed twenty dollars per week or 
twelve percent, whichever is greater, to the 
regular compensation in the same manner to all 
members of the professional staff normally paid 
from other than state funds who in his judgment 
are in categories of employment equivalent to the 
intent and scope of said Chapter 777, provided, 
however, that in the case of those paid from in- 
stitute, grant or contract funds the recommenda- 
tion and certification of the availability of 
funds by the cognizant principal investigator or 
director shall be a prerequisite to the payment 
of any such increase. 

Chairman Healey called on Trustee Maginnis to report on 
the formulation of a Committee to Advise on the Selection of a 
President. 

General Maginnis reported that Chairman Healey had 
appointed the following Trustees as members of the committee: 
Messrs. Crowley, Lambson and Plimpton; Mrs. Knowles, Mrs. Rowland 
and Mrs. Snowden. General Maginnis serves as chairman. 

The following groups on the several campuses will be in- 
vited to advise the Trustee committee by recommending the names of 
individuals who might be considered for the presidency: 



Alumni Association 
Alumni Association 
Faculty (8) & Administration; 

(Provost; 1 dean, 1 department head) 



Faculty (5) & Administration; (1 
partment head and Chancellor) 

Faculty (3) & Administration; (1 
partment head & Dean) 

Student Body, Undergraduate 

Student Body, Graduate 

Student Body 



de- 



de- 



Amherst 

Boston 

Amherst 

Boston 

Worcester 

Amherst 
Amherst 
Boston 



General Maginnis indicated that the committee desires to 
get to work as soon as possible. It is anticipated that the Presi- 
dential search will consume several months. He noted that letters 
of invitation to form the advisory groups will be mailed as soon as 
Trustee approval is given, and that a statement on "Procedures for 
Selection of a President" will be attached to each invitation. It 
was emphasized that all suggestions should be forwarded to Trustee 
Maginnis as chairman of the committee through the Office of the 
Secretary. 



3247 



Presidential 

Selection 

Committee 

Campus 

Advisory 

Groups 



o&^to 



Transfer 
Between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts, 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

By direction of the Trustees, no contact with any 
prospective nominee should be made except by Chairman Maginnis 
personally . 

A faculty member, Dr. Charles H. Page, Professor of 
Sociology, will serve the Trustees as committee consultant. 

The Trustee committee has deliberately avoided providing 
the advisory groups with written criteria for the Presidency. All 
of these groups are members of the University's academic community 
and have general knowledge of what qualities are required in the 
head of the institution. Trustee Maginnis noted that when presi- 
dential criteria are drawn up they sometimes approach the ridiculous 
"The Angel Gabriel would be unable to qualify." Thus, the actual 
criteria for the next President are being left to the good judgment 
of the advisory groups making the recommendations. Chairman Healey 
observed that the committee has an unenviable task in these times 
when many competent and able men are turning away from the responsi- 
bilities of the office. 

Chancellor Broderick requested the Board to approv e a 
transfer of $49,000 from Account 13 to Account 03 in the subsidiary 
accounts in the Disadvantaged Student Program at UM/Boston. He 
pointed out that, in its original request for the Disadvantaged 
Student Program, items were distributed among several accounts; 
however, the appropriation was made totally in the 13 account. He 
stressed the need for student counselors and other reading and 
writing specialists for which funds are required in the 03 account. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the transfer in the subsidiary 
accounts of $49,000 from Account 13 to 
Account 03 for the Disadvantaged Student 
Program at UM/Boston. 

Associate Dean Saunders presented a brief Medical School 
progress report on behalf of Dean Soutter. 

Dr. Saunders noted that nearly 200 Massachusetts students 
had applied for admission to the School in 1970. He alerted the 
Trustees that officials of the Medical Achool have mounting concern 
that the hospital architects will be unable to meet deadlines which 
they themselves have established. 

Chairman Healey stated that the Office of the Commissioner 
of Administration has been saying that the hospital architects 
deadlines are unrealistic. Therefore, any delays which develop will 
not be chargeable to the Bureau of Building Construction. Dr. 
Saunders added that delays encountered at this stage may pyramid at 
the end of the construction period when costs will be most vulnerable 
to escalation. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey requested further updating at the next 
meeting of the Board of Trustees in ten days. It was further noted 
that architectural work on the hospital came to a standstill for 
thirty days during the month of August while key individuals in the 
architectural firm were on vacation. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:27 p.m. 




Rojzrert J. McCartney 
Secreta'cy, Board of Trustee: 



3249 



3250 



TRUSTEE 



Residence 
Hall 

Visiting 
Hours 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 22, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Gardner Room, Sheraton-Boston Hotel, 

Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; Trustees 
Boyden, Chandler, Frechette, Haigis , Knowles, 
Lambson, Plimpton, Pumphret, Rowland, Snowden, 
Troy, Weldon, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo; Chancellor Broderick, Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton, Dean Field, Professor 
George Goddard, Professor Henry Korson, Mrs. 
Hull. From the UM/ Amherst Student Senate: 
Bruce Balboni, Patricia Beharry, Cynthia Olken. 
From the Greenough Executive Council: John 
Lareau, Pamela Pepper; Mr. Melley, Members of 
the Press. 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting, called for the pur- 
pose of considering the proposals put forth by the Committee on Stu- 
dent Activities' at 2:40 p.m. Trustee Rowland, Chairman pro tern of 
that committee made the report. 

Mrs. Rowland said that the Committee on Student Activities 
had held a lengthy meeting with representatives of the Student 
Senate, the faculty and the administration on September 8, 1969. She 
expressed appreciation to the students in particular for their help 
fulness; and reported that some matters then taken up are still under 
discussion by the committee. 



The agenda for the September 8 meeting had covered four 
items: (1) suggestions for modifications in residence hall visiting 
hours (self-determination in residence hall government), (2) proposal 
for change in policy on alcoholic beverages, (3) suggestions for 
changes in picketing code, and (4) proposal to have Greenough resi- 
dence hall occupied by men and women on segregated floors. Discussion 
followed on items (1) and (4) . 

On the question of residence hall self-determination, Mrs. 
Rowland reported that progress had been made, and added that this 
question had been under discussion for several years. Discussion 
followed. 

President Lederle asked Dean Field to comment. The Dean 
reported that studies showed the first year's operation under 
liberalized open house regulations to have been very good. In work- 
ing with the 51 individual house governments involved, responses had 
been favorable and mature. He noted, however, that there had been 
the usual problems to be expected in any new operation - in particu- 
lar, providing for protection against intruders in the dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In reply to Trustee Pumphret's request for information on 
the operation of the system of reporting violations to the Dean of 
Students Office, Dean Field explained that each residence hall has 
a head of residence who is under the supervision of one of four area 
coordinators directly responsible to the Dean of Students. In 
addition, there is the system of student judiciary boards which 
handles any complaints. There is also a Faculty-Student Discipline 
Board operating on a campus-wide basis. 

Miss Olken, Vice-President of the Student Senate, expresed 
her feeling that the majority of students are mature and responsible 
and that they should have the freedom to determine their own regula- 
tions within dormitories. Due to variance of opinion within the 
residential units as to the desirable length of visiting hours, 
corridor autonomy was felt the best way, she said, to respond to the 
desires of individual students. 

Miss Beharry, Secretary to the Student Senate, stated that 
experience has shown that residence halls can make decisions on their 
own and stressed the importance of the people involved making their 
own decisions. She said she had disagreed with the student proposal 
on corridor autonomy, however, and that self-determination should be 
limited to the level of the residence hall as a total entity. 

Mr. Pumphret raised the question of vandalism and the fact 
that this had been in the past a rather serious problem. He asked 
if the situation had improved or if there were no longer problems in 
this area, and whether self-determination implied that students 
would also assume responsibility for control in this area. 

Miss Olken responded that, on the whole, students are re- 
sponsible, and that it was, after all, in their interest to provide 
as far as possible for the safeguarding of property within the 
dormitories, since its loss or destruction directly affected their 
own convenience and well being. 

Dean Field stated that the amount of "non-billable damage" 
in dormitories was now at a very low point. He noted progress in 
another area: a report from the Dean of Admissions that the fail- 
out rate was at the lowest point in ten years. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To support the principle of self-determination of 

visiting rules in residence halls at the University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, and to defer approval 
until specific plans for implementation of such 
self-determination of residence hall government 
are presented. 

Mrs. Rowland then presented the committee's recommendation 
on the Greenough proposal; (Document T70-019) . Discussion followed. 



3251 



3252 



Coed 
Dormitory 

Greenough 

TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo urged adoption of the proposal and reported 
that he had talked to key people at other institutions where co- 
educational dormitories are currently in operation, and that all re- 
proted excellent results. The list of institutions and administra- 
tors contacted included: The Chancellor at University of California 
at Davis; the Dean of the Medical School (and the former acting 
president) at Stanford University; the Provost at the University of 
Connecticut (where there have been coeducational dorms for 6 years) ; 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of 
Rochester; and a group representing Oregon State University. 
Comments were without exception favorable and enthusiastic, and 
these were, for the most part, conservative campuses. 



Miss Pepper of the 
the coffee hour held in June 
Greenough proposal She said 
were in favor and that there 
now. Some parents have even 
support. Three more meeting 
are required to have parents 



Greenough Executive Committee described 
for parents of students working on the 
that all parents involved at that time 
had been no unfavorable comments as of 
written letters enumerating reasons for 
will be held and participating students 
attend at least one meeting. 



Provost Tippo noted that there are two other provisions in 
the proposal: (1) written parental permission for students under 21, 
and (2) approval by all residents of Greenough. 

Commissioner Chandler expressed full support of the pro- 
posal and added that it "might be one way to solve the security 
problem. " 

President Lederle commented that, in a large university 
community of some 17,000 students, it is very important to have a 
sense of "belonging to something" - in this case, belonging to a 
dormitory rather than a fraternity or sorority. With the anonymity 
of a large campus he felt that some students have difficulty relating 
to face-to-face situations at the grass roots level of campus life. 

Bishop Weldon asked if there should not be further dis- 
cussion of the opinion expressed by Mrs. Knowles that Greenough is 
perhaps not a satisfactory building for a coeducational dormitory. 
He raised the question of whether such a building should be specifi- 
cally designed for coed living from an architectural point of view. 

Dean Field replied that, in regard to such practical 
aspects as plumbing, many dormitories are changed at one time or 
another to house students of either sex. Such changes as might be 
needed at Greenough could be considered an investment in flexibility 
He added that Greenough is well adapted to the concept of an experi- 
ment in coeducational housing because of its small size - 118 student 

John Lareau of the Greenough Executive Committee, stated 
that all students involved in the proposal agree that it is an 
acceptable place in which to live. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to Mr. Pumphret's query as to which dining 
commons would be used by Greenough residents, Dean Field replied 
that it would be the South Dining Commons, commonly known as the 
"Copper Kettle." 

Miss Pepper stated that many students are willing to move 
out of new, more luxurious, carpeted dormitories into the rather 
drab atmosphere of Greenough, "which is one of the darkest dormi- 
tories on campus." 

Miss Beharry commented on the very important commitment of 
this group to the concept of "communication in living." 

Mr. Lambson observed that he hoped it was possible to 
differentiate between "communal living" and "communication in living 
Miss Beharry assured him that there was, indeed, a distinction! 

In response to Mrs. Knowles ' question as to how much stu- 
dents may have been influenced by the desire to do the "in" thing, 
and by articles in Life and Time , she was assured that the Greenough 
proposal had evolved before the magazine articles in question 
appeared in print. It was then 

VOTED : To approve, effective the second semester 1969-70, 
the proposal to have Greenough residence hall 
occupied by men and women on segregated floors 
subject to terms set and approved by the Presi- 
dent, the Provost and the Dean of Students. 



3253 



Recorded in opposition: 
Lambson, Pumphret and Weldon. 



Trustees Healey, Knowles, 



Chairman Healey expressed the appreciation of the Board to 
Mrs. Rowland for the hard work done by the Committee on Student 
Activities and to the students for their willingness to be questioned 
so exhaustively during luncheon. Mr. Healey added "that if you are 
the prototype of the kind of the students that we have at the Uni- 
versity, we are very happy to have you here." 

Mr. Healey also expressed appreciation for the fact that 
student involvement and concern had influenced decisions of the 
Board of Trustees in the Quadrangle area; and his hope for the con- 
tinuing work of students and the development of a "two-way street" 
in communications between the Board and the student body. 

Mr. Balboni, who had stressed several times the sense of 
urgency felt by students for the necessity of prompt Trustee action 
at this time, said that it was necessary to realize that students at 
the University of Massachusetts were not pushing for radical change. 



3254 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



He expressed satisfaction with the "real feeling of cooperation 
evident," and thanked the Board for calling this special meeting for 
the purpose of considering these student proposals. 

Chairman Healey adjourned the meeting at 3:25 p.m. 






Robert J. McCartney 
Secretaniy, Board of Truste/efe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
October 18, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; Trustees 
Boyden, Croce, Frechette, Gordon, Haigis, 
Lambson, Lyons, Plimpton, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



3255 



Provost Tippo, Deans Appley, Gugin, Marcus 
and Shapiro; Professors Frank, Silver, UM/A; 
Professors Korson and Reid from Faculty Senate 
UM/A; Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, UM/B; Dean Soutter, UM/W. From the 
Student Senate UN/A, Bruce Balboni; from SWAP, 
UM/A, Glen Mangurian. Planning Officer UM/A, 
H. Jackson Littlefield; Business Manager, UM/A, 
Gerald Grady; Mr. Mel ley and members of the 
press; and Mrs. Hull. 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, President Lederle, in the absence of the 
Chairman, convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. Trustee Crowley was 
named Chairman pro tem. 

The minutes of the previous meeting having been circulated 
and read, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meetings of the Approval of 

Board of Trustees of September 12 and September 22 « 1969. Minutes 

Chairman Crowley called for the President "s comments. SWAP 
President Lederle introduced Mr. Glen Mangurian of the SWAP Committee. Conference 
(Student Workshop and Activity Program) Mr. Mangurian extended an 
invitation to the Board to hold its next meeting in conjunction with 
the SWAP Conference on the weekend of November 14-16, 1969 at the 
Oak n' Spruce Inn in South Lee, Massachusetts. Students, faculty 
and administrators are invited to attend and it was felt that the 
presence of the Board of Trustees would greatly enhance this year's 
conference. Mrs. Rowland had attended last year and found it "an 
exciting and rewarding experience." A summary report of the 1968 
meeting was distributed to all Board members by Mr. Mangurian. 
Trustees Haigis and Lyons and Secretary McCartney enthusiastically 
endorsed the SWAP program and President Lederle urged the members of 
the Board to seriously consider this proposal. The Board agreed to 
consider and act upon this matter as soon as possible. Appreciation 
was extended to the SWAP committee for its invitation. 

Chairman Healey assumed the chair from Trustee Crowley. 



3256 



Medical 
School - 
Ground- 
breaking 



TRUSTEE 



Shaw 

Building 

Construction 



Admissions 



Collective 
Bargaining 



Black 

Studies 

Program 



Ray Ethan 
Torrey 

Professorship 
of Botany 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle next noted that the official ground- 
breaking for the Medical School is next Thursday, October 23. The 
President stated that this is a very important symbolic point in 
the history of the University and the Commonwealth. After much 
travail, the Medical School is now underway. 

Dean Soutter next gave a progress report on Medical School 
construction which began on October 4. Site work is being done by 
the Northgate Construction Company, "which is moving very fast." 
Another most gratifying fact is that the actual cost is $200,000 
under the estimate. Renovation of the Shaw Building will start 
December 1 with completion set for June 1. It is expected that the 
building will be fully equipped by September 1, 1970 for the first 
entering class. 

Fifteen hundred inquiries for admission to the Medical 
School have been received, with more than 350 requests for applica- 
tion forms (these are coming in at the rate of 5-10 daily) . There 
are 132 active applications with 25 of these now complete. It is 
possible now to get some idea of the quality of the applicants. 
Faculty recruitment is proceeding satisfactorily. 

The President next noted progress in the area of collec- 
tive bargaining. A supplemental contract is ready to be signed with 
Unit Three - Maintenance Employees. Negotiations are beginning with 
Unit Seven - Security Employees, and with other groups, including 
clerical and technical. The President asked Mr. Gerald Grady, Uni- 
versity Business Manager^ for further comment. 

Mr. Grady reviewed the labor situation; with seven units 
of non-professional employees on the UM/A campus. Three are repre- 
sented by MSEA and four by AFL-CIO, State and Municipal Employees. 
The contract with #1776 AFL-CIO was signed last May 13, and 
negotiations are now being held on supplemental . Mr. Grady does 
not anticipate any difficulties with the labor situation. There 
have been no requests for bargaining units among faculty or pro- 
fessionals, but, as this is common at other schools, it is something 
to be considered in the future. Mr. Grady noted the administrative 
difficulties involved in the pay raise but anticipates no serious 
problems . 

Trustee Troy, Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy, gave the report of that committee, beginning 
with a progress report on the Black Studies Program. Since last 
year's student demands for a program of black studies, courses have 
been established in black literature, history and sociology of the 
ghetto areas. Three faculty members have been recruited and are 
teaching successfully although their backgrounds are unorthodox. 
Faculty and students are integrated; there is no color line. A 
detailed proposal on this program should be forthcoming soon from 
the Faculty Senate. 

The next report concerned the recommendation of Dean 
Shapiro to establish a named chair in the Department of Botany to 
honor the memory of Professor Ray Ethan Torrey, one of the most dis- 
tinguished teachers in the history of the University. Professor 
Albert C. Smith, an internationally known botanist, will be the firs : 
man to occupy the Chair. 



3257 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That a Professorship in the Department of Botany 
at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, be 
established and named for former Professor Ray 
Ethan Torrey with Professor Albert C. Smith to 
be named to the chair. 

Concerning the UM/A Faculty Senate "Proposal for Partici- 
pation in University Governance," Trustee Troy noted that Professors 
Glen Gordon and Bruce Morris of the Faculty Senate had presented 
this proposal at the last meeting of the committee. Professor 
Morris had focused on four main points (listed on page 3 of the 
minutes of the meeting of October 7, 1969); the essential point be- 
ing that on all matters involving personnel and curriculum the 
faculty voice must effectively be heard. They see this not merely 
as a matter of right, but of the efficient operation of the Uni- 
versity. 

It was also recommended that the Faculty Senate represen- 
tative to the Board of Trustees be present at all informal sessions 
of the Board. The committee found no quarrel with this, but still 
feels that the Board must reserve for itself the power to exclude 
anyone it chooses from executive sessions. 

Trustee Troy noted that the committee is hopeful that the 
UM/B proposal on university governance will be received at an early 
date so that it may be studied along with the Amherst proposal prior 
to a final vote. 

Concerning the Ombudsman Proposal (Document T70-025 - 
Revised) Trustee Troy recalled that he had first presented a report 
on this in great detail last spring at the Worcester meeting of the 
Board. President Lederle, Provost Tippo and Professor Silver have 
since worked out the form of the proposal as now presented. 
Essentially, the revision calls for a faculty member to act in the 
capacity of ombudsman, on a released time basis, giving information 
and assistance to students and others with legitimate grievances. 
The proposal is a moderate one, it was noted, and a trial period has 
been recommended by Profesot Tippo. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the proposal for establishment of the 
post of Ombudsman as detailed in Document T70-025 
as revised. 

This concluded Trustee Troy's report for the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Trustee Gordon next commented on his personal observations 
of the Paris Program (UM/B) and the Freiburg Program (UM/A). Al- 
though he had had initial reservations about programs of this type, 
Mr. Gordon said these were dispelled by seeing the programs in action). 
Much of the credit for the Paris program (essentially at the Sorbonne) 
Must go to Professor MacCombie of UM/B, who had set up the program. 



Faculty 
Senate UM/A 
Proposal for 
Changes in 
University 
Governance 



Attendance 

Trustee 

Meetings 



Revised 
Proposal for 
Ombudsman 
UM/ Amherst 



Paris (UM/B) and 
Freiburg (UM/A) 
Programs 



3258 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Reorganiza- 
tion Study 

Document 
T70-032 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gordon noted the unique combination of course structure and 
freedom present; also, the excitement of the experience, particular- 
ly for those students who had never before been out of Boston. 

The Freiburg Program was described as diverse and "excit- 
ing to see." The respect with which the program is held by Freiburg 
officials (not easy to come by) is evidenced by its inclusion in the 
catalogue. Many prominent . photographs of UM/ Amherst are on display 
there. Mr. Gordon thinks the programs "definitely worth while" and 
urges continued support. 

Chairman Healey gave the report of the Executive Committee 
on the Reorganization of the University. Terming the report a 
"position paper," he said that it had been circulated prior to the 
meeting of all Trustees. He expressed deep appreciation to Dean 
Marcus for the work he had done in helping to formulate this initial 
recommendation, which had required extensive cross-country travel 
and research at other state university systems. The Chairman also 
thanked the students, faculty and administrators who had served on 
the advisory committee on this matter, for their work throughout the 
summer in development of these recommendations. 

Chairman Healey emphasized that the report attempts only 
to outline the broad administrative philosophy for a university 
system. The Executive Committee recommends it at this time to the 
Board. There is no attempt now to be specific, but rather to leave 
future implementation of the administrative structure largely to the 
new president. Final approval of the plan must come later from the 
Board of Trustees within the scope of its responsibilities. 

The report clearly points out that the authority conferred 
at various levels of the administrative structure will be exercised 
in the light of the decision-making process in the University which 
is to be established following Phase II of the reorganization study 
This phase of the study should provide for adequate mechanisms 
which would allow appropriate participation by students, faculty, 
and administration on each of the campuses. 



Basically, the 
vidual campuses, with the 
affairs and operations of 
adequate staffing in the 
include four Vice-Preside 
Finance, Administration, 
have a staff relationship 
tion should restrict its 
overall system management 
day campus operations. 



concept is for a system, rather than indi 
President having full authority over all 
the University. The President should have 
central administration office, which would 
nts: for Academic Affairs, Budget and 
and University Planning. These men would 

to the President. The central administra 
activities to coordination, policy, and 
and should not become involved in day-to- 



The individual campuses would be headed by Chancellors who 
are responsible directly to the President, in a line relationship. 
The individual campuses would operate with as much autonomy as 
possible within the constraints assigned by the responsibilities of 
the central administration. The location of the central University 
administration should be in Boston, but not physically on the Boston 
campus . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Healey noted that, where central administrative offices 
within university systems still remain on the parent campus, there 
seems to be general agreement that a more neutral and central loca- 
tion would be preferable. He also stressed the fact that this is a 
strategic time for change for the University of Massachusetts, with 
the Boston and Worcester campuses now a reality, and when the Presi- 
dent has indicated that he does not wish to continue in his present 
capacity beyond the end of the current academic year. What is sug- 
gested at this time, in order to move ahead with reorganization, is 
not a final vote, but general endorsement in principle of the broad 
administrative policy proposed by the Executive Committee. 

Provost Tippo suggested that the proposal be referred to 
Faculty and Student Senates for review. 

Professor Henry Korson, the Faculty Senate representative 
to the Board, was invited to make comments. Professor Korson said 
that he had not previously received a copy of the document and so 
had had no opportunity to study it. He noted that the Faculty 
Senate agenda for the next meeting (October 23) contains an item re 
lating to the need for information on this subject in which the fac- 
ulty is intensely interested, but not yet informed. It was agreed 
that the Reorganization Study Report summary would be distributed as 
quickly as possible to the Faculty and Student Senates. 

Provost Tippo next asked for comments from Bruce Balboni, 
the President of the Student Senate. Mr. Balboni said that while 
he knew that Miss Cynthia Olken, Senate Vice-President, had been 
working with the advisory committee on this matter, the proceddings 
had been confidential and so there had been no information generally 
available to the student body. He questioned the need for the con- 
fidential procedures of the Board and its committees on this and 
similar matters. 

The Chairman stressed the need for confidentiality up 
until this time, which had been necessary, he said, in order to 
move ahead most expeditiously and to avoid the inevitable debate in 
the press which could have slowed down progress. He called atten- 
tion to the fact that there had been considerable representation by 
all segments of all campuses on the advisory committee which had 
worked on the report. 

Trustee Lyons called attention to the fact that there had 
been, in fact, considerable representation on the committee prepar- 
ing the report by all segments of all campuses, and that this 
properly had been a confidential matter until now, when it could be 
communicated and reviewed. 

President Plimpton, as "one coming from a much smaller 
operation," expressed reservations about the need for a system and 
the vice-presidential structure, in particular. He felt that it 
would be difficult to find top people for these jobs who would not 
'Want to carry the ball themselves." Chairman Healey pointed out the 
need for top staff in any complex operation, and expressed the 



3259 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

Married Student 
Housing Report 
UM/A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

opinion that many top staff people could be found who did not desire 
the responsibility for ultimate decision but would prefer advisory 
and planning roles. 

Provost Tippo stated that in his judgment the plan was a 
sound one and he supported its essential features. He again urged 
that the Board approve the plan in principle and then refer it to 
the Faculty and Student Senates for comment. 

President Lederle commented that the University of Massa- 
chusetts has been operating as "one of the most centrally under- 
staffed systems of higher education in the country." To function, 
it has been necessary for the President to assume full responsibili 
ty for coordination. He sees the plan as a strengthening of the 
organization for smoother operation. There would also be the im- 
portant advantages in having the President and his staff operating 
from a neutral base. The staff then would not be (as they are now 
doing) advising as an overload above a full-time job of administer- 
ing the Amherst campus. 

President Lederle further commented on the difficulties of 
administering a university from one campus of a multi-campus opera' 
tion, with the inevitable charges of favoritism. He noted also that 
Boston is the logical base for a system operation, considering the 
need for interaction with the executive and legislative branches of 
the state government, and with the main financial base of the Common 
wealth. Being the largest city in New England, Boston is also a 
center for transportation facilities and for the news media. 

Chairman Healey, in summation, emphasized again that in 
formulating this report on the proposed reorganization of the Uni- 
versity, it had been necessary to work under the pressures of other 
obligations such as budgetary problems and the Presidential search, 
and the best way to proceed had seemed to be in using responsible 
representative opinion. He also stated that all comments on the 
proposal, either made in person at the next Board meeting or re- 
ceived in writing prior to that date (November 14) , would receive 
the fullest consideration of the Board. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve in principle the Plan for University 
Reorganization with referral to appropriate 
Faculty and Student bodies of all campuses for 
their comments with the request that any comments 
be submitted to the Board prior to the next meet- 
ing on November 14, 1969. (Document T70-032) 

Next on the agenda was the Report of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds presented by Trustee Haigis . The first item 
considered was Married Student Housing - Amherst . After exhaustive 
studies, detailed in the report: Married Student Housing, October 
14, 1969 , the committee offers the following alternative proposals 
to alleviate the current shortage of low-rent units in Amherst: 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(1) to lease through competitive bids modular- 
type prefabricated units on land owned by 
others (which might be at some distance 
from the campus) 

And if (1) does not prove to be feasible 

(2) to build through the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority modular-type units on the Uni- 
versity-owned tract of 30 acres adjacent to the 
campus on North Pleasant Street. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : (1) That housing be made available for married 
students as their numbers increase at the 
Amherst campus. 

(2) That the University of Massachusetts Building 

Authority be requested to provide approximately 
200 low-rental housing units for married stu- 
dents who are attending the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst for occupancy by 
September 1, 1970, and that this housing be 
provided in the following manner: 

First - To lease through competitive bids 
solicited from private enterprise 
sources, approximately 200 new low 
rental units for a period of five 
years suitable for married students 
in reasonable proximity to the 
Amherst campus, said units to be 
provided by others on privately 
owned land. 

Second - In the event suitable married stu- 
dent housing cannot be leased under 
First above, the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority is re- 
quested to construct on University 
owned land approximately 200 units 
either of a prefabricated single 
family unit or a prefabricated 
modular apartment type of unit as 
may be determined most feasible from 
a cost and completion date basis. 

Chairman Haigis next reported on developments in the area 
of Ocean Engineering - specifically, the possible acquisition of 
property at Hodgkins Cove in Gloucester. Treasurer Johnson des- 
cribed this as a very attractive property of seven acres, wharf and 
buildings which the owners are willing to sell to the University at 
cost. The possibility of acquiring this property through the UMass 



3261 



Proposal - 
Modular Type 
Pre- 
fabricated 
Housing Units 



Hodgkins 

Cove 

Property 



;262 



TRUSTEE 



Roads and 
Signs - 
Amherst 



Motor 

Vehicle 

Regulations 

Correction 
of Error in 
Document 
T70-012 



Columbia 
Point - 
Land 

Acquisition 
Parcel (E) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Foundation has been discussed with legal counsel and the concurrence 
of the Board on proceeding with negotiations is requested. A more 
specific proposal will be presented at a later date. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To instruct the University administration to 
move ahead vigorously on acquisition of the 
Hodgkins Cove property. 

The detailed list of all recent campus installation of 
roads and signs was presented by Treasurer Johnson for approval. 
It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the schematic for road and traffic 
signs on the University's Amherst campus as 
detailed on maps prepared by the Department of 
Physical Plant - Document T70-026. 

It was noted that an error had been made in Document 
T70-012 regarding motor vehicle regulations which document was 
approved by the Board of Trustees at its meeting of August 11, 1969 
After a request that correction be made, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the first sentence of Section 1, Article V 
of the Motor Vehicle Regulations for the 
Amherst campus approved by the Board of Trustees 
on August 11, 1969 (Document T70-012) be amended 
by changing Roman numeral III appearing therein 
to Roman numeral IV. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, UM/B, reported on Land Acquisi- 
tion - Columbia Point . Everything is in order for the taking of 



Parcel (E) on the University Land Acquisition Maps at the average 
appraisal value of $935,000, with tax liability making the total 
award in the amount of $942,960.41. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490-0102 

of the Acts of 1969, and all other acts, authoriz- 
ing the Trustees of the University to acquire land, 
or land with buildings thereon, by purchase or by 
eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the development of the University of Massachusetts 
at Columbia Point in the City of Boston; independent 
appraisals having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and field with Vice-Chancellor William R. 
Hamilton, Jr.; the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, a parcel of land 
now or formerly the Robert Haufler property as shown 
as parcel on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Boston, 
(Dorchester) Mass." Surveyed by New England Survey 
Service Inc. October 6, 1969 and that the sum of 



3263 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$935,000 be and hereby Is awarded as damages 
therefor and $5,941.56 for taxes apportioned 
for the current year, and that Robert J. 
McCartney, Secretary, Board of Trustees, is 
hereby authorized to sign the order of taking 
for and in the name of the Board of Trustees. 

Chancellor Broderick reported on acquisition of land 
parcels (F) and (H) on the University Land Acquisition Maps. He 
asked for permission of the Board to negotiate for these parcels on 
the basis of appraisals that will be submitted at a subsequent meet- 
ing. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize Chancellor Broderick and Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton, UM/B to negotiate 
actively on the basis of appraisals on file 
with Boston College High School officials for 
acquisition of the portion of land at Columbia 
Point presently owned by the Boston College High 
School which they are willing to make available 
to us . 

Trustee Haigis asked Mr. Johnson to review plans up for 
approval on the Tobin Hall and all-weather track projects. The 
Treasurer noted that the total project cost estimate for Tobin Hall 
is $7,602,000, with an appropriation of only $5,840,000. The 
deficiency is due to escalation and it is expected that it can be 
covered in part by BBC contingency funds, and in part by movable 
equipment and construction economies. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve final plans for Tobin Hall as pre- 
pared by the architectural firm of Coletti 
Brothers as detailed in documents on file in 
the office of Director George Norton, Department 
of Physical Plant. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve plans for the all-weather track. 

Chairman Haigis noted that a change in policy is necessary 
on the Room Refund Rate . Because of some unavoidable overcrowding 
this year in the dormitories and the resultant tripling in some 254 
occupancies, students have requested a change in the refund rate in 
these cases from 207. to 307, . This change is recommended by the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds. 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



Parcels (F) 
and (H) 



Tobin 
Hall 

All-weather 
Track 



Room 

Refund 

Rate 

UM/ Amherst 



3264 



TRUSTEE 



Capital 
Outlay 
Budget - 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To rescind a ^- previous votes of the Trustees 
pertaining to the refund of portions of student 
room rent when there is assigned occupancy over 
the normal occupancy level of a room and to 
establish in place thereof the following policy: 

That when students are assigned at the con- 
venience of the University to a residence hall 
room in a number in excess of the normal 
occupancy level of that room for a period in 
excess of six weeks in any semester, the room 
rental rate for each such student shall be 
adjusted to 70% of the then current rate for 
that room and if such room is equipped with 
a telephone the rate for the telephone shall 
also be adjusted to 10% of the normal rate per 
student; provided, that in the administration 
of this policy "the convenience of the Uni- 
versity" shall not be construed to in any way 
negate the pledge previously undertaken by the 
Trustees to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority with reference to maintain- 
ing full occupancy in Authority-owned buildings; 
this policy to be effective with the Fall 
semester, 1969. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority that it adopt as part of its 
rules and regulations governing the Residence 
Halls owned by the Authority the room rate 
adjustment policy adopted by the Trustees as 
of this date. 

Chancellor Broderick next reported on Special Capital 
Request - UM/B. For the 5000 students at UM/Boston, the Board of 
Trustees has already authorized UM/B to request of the Governor and 
the Legislature capital outlay of 150 million for the first phase of 
construction. The Executive branch, however, reduced the original 
request to 50 million as an initial appropriation to start construc- 
tion with subsequent appropriations to follow. UM/Boston is now 
requesting the remainder of the original 150 million capital outlay 
sum to carry construction through the period September/October 1970 
to September/October 1971. Detailed figures projecting estimated 
expenditures for this appropriation are available from Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



I 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve a capital outlay request of 
$100 million for fiscal 1971 for the UM/ 
Boston Columbia Point campus with in- 
struction to the administration that the 
attention of the Governor and the Legis- 
lature be called to the fact that the 
$50,000,000 appropriation of 1969 was 
mainly for design, site work, land 
acquisition, and foundations with the 
additional $100 million now required for 
actual construction of buildings and 
facilities for Phase I - to accommodate 
5000 students. Details are set forth in 
Documents T70-028 and T70-029. 

A request for a change in policy on naming buildingswas 
next discussed. Trustee Haigis referred to the request of the 
School of Engineering to name the Main Engineering Building after 
the School's first dean, George A. Marston. It was noted that there 
is already precedent for departure from policy (by naming buildings 
after living persons) in four buildings on campus. The Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds recommends another exception in the present 
instance . 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the Main Engineering Building on the Uni- 
versity's Amherst campus be named in honor of 
George A. Marston, first dean of the Engineering 
School. 

Trustee Haigis noted that Mr. Johnson had recommended 
acceptance of the higher rates effective in the new Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates contract. It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the rates for Master Planning Services 

of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates are approved 
as follows: 

1. Services shall be provided on a time basis 
computed as follows: 

a. Principals' and Associates' time shall be 
charged at the fixed rates of: 

$30.00 per hour for Principals 

25.00 per hour for Senior Associates 
22.50 per hour for Associates 

b. Employees' time shall be charged at a 
multiple of two and one-half times (2.5) 
Direct Personnel Expense. Direct Personnel 
Expense includes costs for landscape archi- 
tects, architects, planners, designers, job 
captains, draftsmen, specification writers, and 
report technical typists, in consultation, re- 
search and design, in producing drawings and 
specifications and other documents pertaining 
to the project, and in services during 
construction. 



3265 



Naming of 

Main 

Enginering 

Building 

for George 

Marston 



Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates 
Contract Rates 



3266 



Degrees 



Presidential 
Agenda 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Additional services of professional consultants 
engaged for the normal structural, mechanical 
and electrical engineering services shall be 
charged at the amount billed to Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, Inc. for such additional services 

3. Reimbursable expenses are in addition to the fee 
for services and shall include actual expenditures 
made by the firm on its consultants in the inter- 
est of the project such as: 

Copies of drawings, specifications, and 
reports in excess of three. Expense of 
transportation and living when travel- 
ing in connection with the project. 

If authorized in advance by Client, 
special photography, models, special 
renderings, and fees for special 
consultants . 

President Lederle recommended approval of lists of candi- 
dates for degrees - undergraduate and graduate, as of September 1, 
1969. It was 

VOTED : To approve the awarding of degrees as of 

September 1, 1969 at the undergraduate and 
graduate levels as appropriate on the certi- 
fied lists received from the Office of the 
Registrar and the Graduate School Office, 
Documents T70-030 and T70-031, which are here- 
with attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

President Lederle recommended approval of the Personnel 
Actions which had been circulated. 

After consideration, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions as 
detailed in Document T70-023, which document is 
herewith attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

It was then 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential Appoint- 
ments Without Tenure, for the period September 13, 
1969 to October 18, 1969, as detailed in Document 
T70-023A, which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was further 



3267 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject to 
the policies and procedures now in effect as 
subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the pro- 
fessional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 



It was then 



VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles under 
the provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific weekly 
salary rate which shall not be changed except by 
vote of the Board of Trustees and such classifica- 
tion shall not be designated by any job group 
number or grade . 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



In this connection, Trustee Gordon suggested that the 
Personnel Action lists would be easier to read if divided into 
sections by campus. Provost Tippo agreed and the suggestion was 
accepted. 

The Board then went into executive session for discussion 
of honorary degrees. During this session it was also decided to 
accept the invitation of the SWAP Committee, and to hold the 
November 14, 1969 meeting in South Lee at the Oak n' Spruce Lodge, 
site of the 1969 SWAP Conference. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




Robert J/ 
Secretary, B 





euartne} 
d of Trustees ' 



3268 



TRUSTEE 



Powell Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 14, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Oak n' Spruce Lodge, South Lee, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 

PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Croce, Crowley, 
Gordon, Haigis, Knowles, Lambson, 
Lyons, Maginnis , Plimpton, Pumphret, 
Rowland, Sweig, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



For Trustee Sullivan, Mr. John Kearney; 
Provost Tippo, Associate Provosts Allen, 
Gluckstern; Deans Appley, Field; 
Assistant Dean Gugin; Dr. Hunt, Messrs. 
Grady, Littlefield, UM/A; Chancellor 
Broderick, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, 
Mr. O'Brien, UM/B; Dean Soutter, UM/W; 
From Faculty Senate, UM/A, Professors 
Korson and Reid; from the Student Senate, 
UM/A, Bruce Balboni and Cynthia Olken; 
from Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, 
Inc.: Messrs. Sasaki, Alexander, 
Gebhart and Minervino; from John W. 
Powell Consultants, Inc., Mr. John 
Powell. Also, Mr. Melley, members of 
the press, and Mrs. Hull. 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, Chairman Healey convened the meeting 
into executive session at 1:45 p.m. following luncheon. 

Honorary degrees and security matters were discussed. 
Mr. John Powell, whose firm had previously submitted a report on 
security operations at the University, was present for the 
discussion and gave a brief summary of the report. 

The regular session of the Board was subsequently called 
to order by the Chairman at 3:15 p.m. Present, in addition to 
guests of the Board, were the hosts for the weekend SWAP conference 
and their other invited guests from among students, 
ministration. 



faculty and ad- 



Chairman Healey expressed the appreciation of the members 
of the Board of Trustees for the invitation to participate in the 
weekend activities of the SWAP Committee. He noted the desirability 
of interchange of ideas among various segments of the campus commu- 
nity concerning University matters. He called attention to the fact 
that a majority of Board members were present. Many had traveled 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



long distances over rainy roads for the meeting as evidence of their 
great concern for the affairs of the University. 

Chairman Healey welcomed Mr. John Kearney, Assistant 
to Massachusetts Commissioner of Education and representing Trustee 
Neil V. Sullivan at this meeting. 

The minutes of the last meeting of the Board of 
Trustees (October 18, 1969) were presented for approval. Secretary 
McCartney noted two substantive changes to be made as follows: On 
page 8, the figure in the fourth from the bottom line should read 
$7,760.41 instead of $7,790.41 . On page 10 , under Special Capital 
Outlay Requests - UM/B: the phrase "increased by 1.45 million due 
to escalation" should be deleted, and the figure used in the vote 
should be changed from $101,450,000 to $100,000,000 . 



With these changes, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of October 18, 1969 
with corrections through substantive 
changes as recited by the Secretary. 

Chairman Healey called for the President's comments. 
President Lederle noted that copies of the Contract Proposal between 
UM/A and the MSEA had been circulated, and asked for comments. 
Mr. Grady explained the wording used in some sections of the con- 
tract. As no changes were suggested, it was agreed that the Presi- 
dent will proceed to implement the University's obligations under 
Chapter 637 of the Acts of 1964, as authorized by the Board. 

Trustee Pumphret questioned items mentioned in 
Auditor Buczko's report related to the Waltham Field Station. In 
response, Treasurer Johnson explained that the field station budget 
comes under the College of Agriculture, and that the items in 
question - specifically sewing machines - had been used in a 
cooperative project in Roxbury. 

Chairman Healey requested Trustee Pumphret, as 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, to see that a full report on the 
Auditor's report is made to the Board. 

The Chairman next gave the report of the Executive 
Committee. He pointed out that the Board of Trustees has spent 
much time on the matter of open housing, an area which has also 
given much concern to students. While recognizing the right of 
students to conduct their own lives without the Board of Trustees 
acting "in loco parentis," the Board also recognizes its responsi- 
bilities under the laws of the Commonwealth. These basic responsi- 
bilities it cannot delegate - even if it so desired. It should 
also be recognized, Chairman Healey stated, that the Board, as well 



3269 



Approval 
of Minutes 



Collective 
Bargaining 

UM/ Amherst 



Auditor' s 
Report - 
Waltham 
Field Station 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Open House 
Policy - 
Residence 
Halls 



3270 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as students and administrators, is looking for the right answers in 
a very complex area. 

Chairman Healey stated for the record, so there would be 
no further misunderstandings in this matter, the position of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees as follows: 

1. The Board of Trustees, under Section 3 of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws, has the sole 
authority to adopt, amend or repeal rules 
and regulations for the government, manage- 
ment, control, and administration of the 
University. This Section of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth further provides 
that this authority to establish rules and 
regulations may not be delegated by the 
Board to any other agency. The members of 
the Board of Trustees are themselves subject 
to the law, and as officers of the Common- 
wealth are sworn to carry out their duties 
and responsibilities under the statutes. 

2. The Executive Committee is recommending that 
the Board of Trustees reaffirm its earlier 
position in regard to self-determination of 
open housing subject to adequate security 
measures for protection of person and property. 

3. The Board of Trustees reaffirms its under- 
standing that the rules which are published 
in the Student Handbook for 1969-70 are the 
rules in effect on the Amherst campus of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

4. In view of the fact that there have been 

some misunderstandings as to who has authority 
to establish the regulations, and as to what 
regulations are now in effect, no violations 
of the existing rules prior to the publication 
of today's action of the Board of Trustees 
will be subject to disciplinary procedures by 
the University. 

5. Liberalization of rules relating to open 
housing will become effective for each dormi- 
tory unit only upon approval by the Provost 
of the University, with respect to matters 
relating to security of person and property. 

The Board of Trustees further expects, Chairman Healey 
stated, that each residential unit will get its respective situation 
in order so that it can make a presentation to the Provost who will 



3271 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

work on this matter with great speed and interest. The Provost 
will look to the students for guidance and counsel, Chairman Healey 
said, in coming up with reasonable regulations. Security provi- 
sions have already been received from a number of residence halls 
and it would seem that the problem is very near solution. The bur- 
den is now on the students and the administrators to clear up the 
details of implementation and policy. The Chairman called for 
discussion. 

There were general expressions of approval of the policy 
by Board members. Trustee Sweig remarked that student demands for 
rights should be accompanied by student responsibility for disci- 
pline and order. He expressed confidence that students would work 
cooperatively with administrators in the interests of education, 
"which, of course, is what they are here for." 

Provost Tippo noted that the Student Senate had called 
for a student-administration committee for review of security plans 
and that it would be his intent to work with this committee. 

Chairman Healey asked if plans would be tailored to indi- 
vidual residences. The Provost replied that this would be 
essential as there were so many different types of residence halls 
on the campus. 

Trustee Rowland suggested that perhaps students would 
want to take a look at their own governmental and judiciary systems 
to see if these systems are meeting their needs or if there may 
have been some breakdowns. 

Trustee Knowles suggested that the word "self-determina- 
tion" perhaps should be changed to "self-discipline." 

Trustee Croce expressed concern that residence hall 
responsibilities be taken seriously. He asked that the Board be 
kept informed with regular reports of progress. 

Mr. Balboni, President of the Student Senate, was 
recognized. Mr. Balboni stated that, as the Board had reaffirmed 
its position, he would like "with some reluctance" to make a policy 
statement for the undergraduate student body. He assumed, he said, 
that the Board was aware that there were a number of regulations 
in the Student Handbook on which the Student Senate had chosen to 
differ. The Student Senate had expressed the stand that, insofar ajs 
the student government and courts were concerned, the Student Senate 
passed regulations would be the ones in effect. In connection with 
the request made to the Board to recognize student rights in this 
area, he noted that the plan now proposed (for security review by 
the Provost) is essentially in the same spirit as student govern- 
ment legislation endorsing a student-administration committee for 
this purpose. 



Security 
Plans 



3272 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey emphasized again that the problem is 
basically legal in character. Chapter 75 of the General Laws refers 
specifically to students, so that even if the Board wished to dele- 
gate this authority as a policy matter, it could not do so as a 
matter of law. If students wish to take a position on this matter, 
the Chairman said, they should address their arguments to the state 
legislature and not to the Board of Trustees. The Board, he said, 
would be derelict in its duties if it delegated its responsibilities 
in this matter. 

Chairman Healey expressed the hope that the Board, the ad- 
ministration, students and faculty could next address themselves to 
the much larger matter of Phase II of University Reorganization. 
Much thought is now being given to the decisional process within the 
University and to allocation of responsibilities at various levels. 

There is the realization, of course, that there must be 
some ultimate instrument of responsibility for overall policy review 
and for long-range planning. The Chairman pointed out the size and 
complexity of the University operation, with a fifty million dollar 
operating budget and a capital outlay budget in excess of one 
hundred million dollars. 

A vote was called for on the five points recommended by 
the Executive Committee. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : 1. The Board of Trustees has sole authority 
under Section 3 of Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws to adopt, amend, or repeal 
rules and regulations for the government, 
management, control, and administration 
of the University. 

2. The Board reaffirms its approval in 
principle of self-determination by resi- 
dential halls of visiting hours and other 
visiting regulations providing adequate 
security plans are approved. 

3. The Board reaffirms its understanding that 
the rules and regulations in the 1969-70 
Student Handbook are presently in effect. 

4. In view of some misunderstanding, no vio- 
lation of visiting rules occurring prior 
to the publication of this statement of 
the Board will be subject to disciplinary 
action. 

5. Liberalization of rules relating to resi- 
dential hall visiting will be effective 
for each house upon the approval of the 
Provost of adequate provisions for security 
of person and property. 



3273 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Turning to Phase I of the University Reorganization Plan, 
which was voted in principle at the Board meeting of October 18, 
(with the intervening month reserved for comments) Chairman Healey 
noted that two formal communications had been received: one from 
Dean Soutter objecting to certain phases of the plan, and one from 
the Amherst Faculty Senate expressing approval. 

The Executive Committee is flexible on the matter of not 
defining at this time the titles of the President's top staff 
(Vice-Presidents, etc.); but, the Chairman stated, it could not be 
flexible on the matter of location of the President's office. It 
is vital to the Reorganization Plan that the Office of the Presi- 
dent be in a central location and not physically located on any 
campus. Mr. Healey noted, however, the possibility that the legis- 
lature might not fully fund all aspects of reorganization and that 
it might be necessary, during an interim period, for the President 
to operate from the Amherst campus. He emphasized that this would 
not be a desirable arrangement. 

Mr. Balboni stated that the Student Senate had endorsed 
the Reorganization Plan, and would like to recommend that a student 
administration committee be established to assist in the selection 
of a chancellor for the Amherst campus. Chairman Healey expressed 
agreement with this proposal. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the Plan for University Reorganization - 
Phase I - as set forth in Document T70-032, which 
document is attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 

The Chairman next requested Trustee Haigis, Chairman of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds for the report of that 
committee. 

Chairman Haigis referred to the great complexity of 
matters coming before this committee and asked the Board to refer 
to the Buildings and Grounds minutes of November 7 for background 
information. 

-Trustee Haigis introduced members of the firm of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, site design consultants for the Univer- 
sity. Messrs. Alexander and Minervino made the presentation of the 
Master Plan Concept - Phase V - for the UM/Boston Columbia Point 
site. 



Mr. Alexander noted that the project was a team effort, 
with much data being supplied by other consulting firms in the 
areas of acoustics, cost, structural engineering, utilities, 
traffic engineering, and soil analysis. 



Phase I 

University 
Reorganization 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



Phase V 

Master Plan 
Concept - 
Columbia 
Point 

UM/Boston 



3274 



TRUSTEE 



Columbia 
Point - 
Land 
Acquisition 



Parcels 
F & H 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Slides were shown of the present site and the adjacent 
Boston College High School property; also, access points from 
Morrissey Boulevard and the Savin Hill Cove water area and offshore 
islands. Maps showing the location of the seven borings made for 
soil analysis, and diagrams showing different types of foundations 
possible were projected, as well as road elevations and plans for 
circulation patterns and parking systems. Many artists' conceptions 
of buildings, promenades, the central plaza, and the relationship of 
some of the buildings to the water area were shown, as well as a 
scale model of the entire Columbia Point Master Plan Concept. At 
the conclusion of the presentation, Mr. Hideo Sasaki was introduced 
to the meeting. 

i- •'!.?. : ill -■_•: 

In further discussion, it was brought out that, on the 
whole, the site is looking more favorable than first expected with 
regard to foundations, but that noise and air pollution factors are 
proving more troublesome than anticipated. It was then moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the Master Plan Concept for the 
UM/Boston Columbia Point site, Phase V, as 
presented by the firm of Pietro Belluschi 
and Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates. 

It is the sense of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, 
and so understood by the firm, that we will preserve the essential 
character of the site in regard to its relationship to the seas. 

Chairman Haigis next asked for a vote on land acquisition 
at Columbia Point, Parcels (F) and (H) . On motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : That, in accordance with Chapter 898, Item 

7490-0102 of the Acts of 1969, and all other 
acts, authorizing the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity to acquire land, or land with buildings 
thereon by purchase or by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws for the 
development of the University of Massachusetts 
at Columbia Point in the City of Boston; in- 
dependent appraisals having been made by quali- 
fied disinterested appraisers and filed with 
Vice-chancellor William R. Hamilton, Jr. , the 
Trustees of the University purchase or take 
by eminent domain in fee, two parcels of land 
supposed to be owned by the Boston College 
High School, situated adjacent to Savin Hill Cove 
in the City of Boston, and shown as Parcels (F) 
and (H) on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Boston, (Dorchester) Mass.," surveyed by New 
England Survey Service, Inc., October 6, 1969, 
Scale 1" = 200; and that the sum of $461,366 



3275 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

lie and hereby is awarded as damages for 
Parcel (F) , and that the sum of $126,166 
be and hereby is awarded as damages for 
Parcel (H) , and that Robert J. McCartney, 
Secretary, Board of Trustees, is hereby i 
authorized to sign the order of taking for 
and in the name of the Board of Trustees. 

A procedural vote was also necessary to empower Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton, UM/Boston, to approve preliminary plans and 
working documents related to UM/Boston construction projects. It 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To designate Vice-chancellor William R. 
Hamilton, Jr. as the UM/Boston official 
empowered to approve preliminary plans and 
working documents related to UM/Boston 
construction projects for the Bureau of 
Building Construction. 

It is now necessary to move rapidly ahead with land for 
future expansion at UM/Boston. Chairman Haigis asked for the vote 
to proceed. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to move 
forward as rapidly as possible with all 
proceedings necessary for the acquisition 
of land situated north of the present 
University site at Columbia Point and 
presently owned by the City of Boston. 

Chairman Haigis next introduced for discussion the matter 
of hostel units at UM/Boston which earlier had been brought before 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds . After extensive discussion, 
it was decided that the matter would be referred to an ad hoc 
committee for further study. 



On the matter of Married Student Housing - Amherst, 
Chairman Haigis noted that it is now necessary formally to desig- 
nate the property to be used as a site for housing units. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees designate the 
30-acre tract owned by the University 
adjacent to and north of the campus in 
Amherst and situated on North Pleasant 
Street between the Presidential Apart- 
ments and the Puffton Village Apartments 
as a site for the construction of not 
less than 200 units of married student 
housing. 



Vice-chancellor 
Hamilton 

Authorized 
to Sign 



Hostels - 
UM/Boston 



Married 
Student 
Housing 



3276 



Fiscal 1971 
Priorities 
U of M 
Capital 
Outlay 



Land 
Acquisition 

Worcester 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University 
Relations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Haigis next presented the 1971 Capital Outlay 
Priorities. It was agreed that it would not be submitted to the 
BHE until December first, to give the Trustees an opportunity to 
review and comment. If changes are proposed, the matter can again 
come before the Board at the December meeting. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

■ 

VOTED : To accept and approve the Fiscal 1971 
Priorities for University of Massachu- 
setts Capital Outlay as detailed in 
Document T70-035. 

The final item for presentation by Trustee Haigis was re- 
lated to land acquisition - UM/Worcester . Treasurer Johnson gave 
a brief report on the current status of the Anderson property. 
There have been leg;al delays and problems, l Title to the property 
has now been assumed by the second mortgage holder and the agreed 
settlement price is $23,000. On motion made and seconded, it was 

. VOTED : - That, in accordance with Chapter 847 Item 
8066-98 of the Acts of 1965, and all other 
acts, authorizing the Trustees of the Uni- . 
versity to acquire land, or land with build- 
ings thereon, by purchase or by eminent do- 
main under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the development of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School in the City of 
Worcester; independent appraisals having 
been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer; that the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity purchase or take by eminent domain in 
fee, the property formerly of Alan R. and 
Joan E. Anderson situated at 382 Plantation 
Street, in Worcester, Worcester County, 
Massachusetts and more particularly described 
in a deed recorded June 14, 1963 at the 
Worcester District Registry of Deeds in Book 
4377, pages 220 and 221, and that the purchase 
price for said property be Twenty Three 
Thousand ($23,000.00 Dollars, and that the 
conveyance be subject to the conditions and 
agreements as set forth in the option for the 
purchase of the said property signed by the 
present owner Benjamin Cohen, 80 Salisbury- 
Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Chairman Healey next asked Trustee Gordon to present the 
report of the Committee on Government and University Relations. 



3277 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Gordon noted that an interim operation on 
matters relating to government relations had been set up at the 
University for this year, pending selection of the new president. 

The matter most ' seriously concerning this committee at 
the moment is the question of policy regarding admission of 1500 
additional students. This is a serious problem, in light of current 
restrictions in the operating budgets. Meetings are being held 
with the executive and legislative leadership, and it is hoped that 
a solution can be found soon. 

It has been agreed, Trustee Gordon said, that representa- 
tives from the Student Senate and from the Faculty Senate would be 
invited to sit in on meetings of the Government and University Re- 
lations Committee with the understanding that the committee re- 
serves the right to hold executive sessions whenever necessary. 

Trustee Pumphret made a brief report for the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority on Married Student Housing - 
Amherst . It should have been stated, he said, at the meeting of 
November 7 of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds that the Uni- 
versity Bunilding Authority cannot legally lease housing units built 
by private developers. The University, however, can exercise this 
option. Trustee Pumphret will make a full report to the Board on 
this matter in December. 

President Lederle recommended approval of the Personnel 
Actions which had been circulated. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnel actions 
as detailed in Document T70-033, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was then 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
October 19, 1969 to November 14, 1969, as 
detailed in Document T70-033A, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to 
or repealed by the Board of Trustees with 
respect to professional personnel under pro- 
visions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as 



U of M 
Building 
Authority 
Report 



Presidential 
Agenda 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



3278 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student 
Activities 

Policy on 
Alcoholic 
Beverages 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job 
specification for each position to which a 
member of the professional staff is hereby 
appointed, promoted, transferred or de- 
termined shall be as hereafter determined 
by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

Trustee Lyons gave the report of the Committee on Student 
Activities. As the Board had acted as a Committee of the Whole on 
the question of open housing regulations, this committee had no 
further recommendations to make on the matter. 

. On the matter of alcoholic beverage consumption on campus, 
Chairman Lyons reviewed the policy statement prepared by counsel, 
Mr. Austin Broadhurst, as presented to this committee on November 4. 
(Document T70-034 - with subsequent corrections as made in the text) 
This statement will replace paragraph G, the existing statement in 
the Student Handbook on alcoholic beverage consumption on the campus 
In summary: with respect to the regulation of the acquisition, 
possession, transportation and consumption of alcoholic beverages, 
students will be told what the state statutes say, that there are 
criminal penalties for violation of the statutes, and that enforce- 
ment of these statutes is a police matter. In addition, alcoholic 
beverages shall not be offered or consumed in group functions (more 
than six persons) except at places, whether in or out of doors and 
at times and under circumstances previously approved by a responsi- 
ble University agency to be designated by the President. 

Chairman Healey asked if there were comments from the 
students present. 

Mr. Balboni asked if the "responsible agency" designated 
by the President could be a student agency. It was agreed that this 
would be at the discretion of the President, but in any case could 
not involve students under 21 years of age. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the statement on alcoholic 
beverages as set forth in Document 
T70-034, which document is attached to 
and made a part of these minutes; and to 
request the Administration to publish pertinent sectionb 
of the State regulations on alcoholic beverages in the Student Hand- 
Chairman Healey stated that the "Report of the Ad Hoc book. 
Committee on Dorm Autonomy" reflected a great deal of study and that! 
he would be glad to refer it to the Committee on Student Activities, 
as it would be relevant to the larger problems of governance and de- 
cisional processes in terms of University reorganization. 
(Document T7Q-036) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey asked if there were further student 
questions or comments concerning dormitory visiting rules, etc. 

Mr. Balboni, expressing "reservations" concerning what he 
was about to say, protested that a decision had been reached by the 
Board without student representatives present. 

Chairman Healey stated that the Board had been in formal, 
executive session as it was entitled to be under the law. He indi- 
cated that a reading of the statute would explain the necessity for 
such sessions. Chairman Healey further stated that all students 
present had been given full opportunity to express opinions to the 
Board, and that matters not related to student open housing regula- 
tions had been discussed. 

Trustee Crowley took exception to the charge that a 
secret meeting had been held without considering the rights of stu- 
dents. "I have not participated in a secret meeting," he said. 
"I was in the executive session and no decisions were made there in 
respect to this matter." 

President Lederle reminded the Senate President that two 
or three sub-committee meetings and a meeting of the full Board of 
Trustees had considered student self-determination issues with 
student participation and that the student viewpoint had been heard. 

Miss Olken, Student Senate Vice-President, stated that 
some of the points presented in the statement of the Executive 
Committee came as a surprise to the students present here today, 
and that they had not previously been informed of its contents. 

Trustee Gordon noted that the reason for Trustees 
attendance at the SWAP conference was for continuing dialogue on 
student affairs and other matters of mutual concern and that there 
would be ample opportunity for discussion. 

Chairman Healey reaffirmed the position of the Board in 
that no new policy had been made at this meeting with the exception 
of the provision that security plans be approved by the Provost. 
This, he said, had been done in a spirit of helpfulness to the stu- 
dents in order to move rapidly toward implementation. All sections 
of the policy statement were reaffirmations either of the statutes 
of the Commonwealth or of previously stated policies of the Board. 

Mr. Terrence Terrell spoke briefly as a member of the Ad 
Hoc Committee on Dorm Autonomy had had prepared the report 
mentioned earlier by Chairman Healey. He said that the main con- 
siderations of that committee had been in two areas mentioned by 
Trustees: (1) student responsibilities being commensurate with stu- 
dent rights and powers and (2) the present mechanisms for dealing 
with student governance. In regard to (2) Mr. Terrell stated that 
it was the feeling of the committee that the present mechanisms were 
effective. He also said that three-fourths of a student's time is 



3279 



3280 



TRUSTEE 

Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

spent in the dormitory and that the committee is concerned "that a 
great deal of learning can go on there and perhaps is not." 

Dean Soutter spoke on continuing problems with Medical 
School construction. The BBC, he said, in addition to presenting 
incomplete and delayed plans, has announced further delays in con- 
struction and renovation deadlines with the result that there is no 
certainty that the necessary buildings will be ready for opening of 
school next fall. The Dean requested approval to proceed, if 
necessary, with plans for partial completion and occupancy for 1972 
and 1973, even though this procedure is more expensive. 

President Lederle expressed the resolve that he and the 
Chairman of the Board would again appeal to the executive branch for 
action on this matter. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 





Robertf/J. McCartney 
Secretary, L/Board of Trustee/ 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

December 15, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel. 

Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey; Trustees Boyden, 
Crowley, Gordon, Greenblatt, Haigis, 
Lambson, Lyons, Maginnis, Pumphret, 
Rowland, Snowden, Sweig, Troy, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



3281 



For Trustee Sullivan, Mr. Kearney; 
Provost Tippo, Dean Gugin, Mr. Little- 
field, Mrs. Hull, Mr. Stadlen, UM/A; 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, Professor 
Weaver, Mr. Cass, Mr. O'Brien, UM/B; 
Dr. Saunders, Mr. Stockwell, UM/W; 
Mr. Broadhurst; from Campbell, Aldrich 
and Nulty, Inc., Messrs. Aldrich and 
Mendell; from Ritchie Associates, 
Mr. Moyes ; Mr. Melley and members of 
the press. 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being 
present and acting throughout, the formal session of the Board was 
convened by Chairman Healey at 2:30 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting (November 14, 1969) 
were presented for approval. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees for November 14, 1969. 

In the absence of Dean Soutter, a progress report on the 
Medical School was given by Dr. Saunders. Two hundred and fifty- 
seven applications, all from certified Massachusetts residents, have 
been received of which 67 have been interviewed. Interviews have 
been scheduled for 55 others, and by January 2, 1970, 407, of all 
applicants will have been interviewed. 

As a related matter, the BBC will not finally review 
bidding on Shaw Building renovations until January 13. With this 
matter pending, the question is whether or not to proceed with stu- 
dent acceptances. Trustee Greenblatt expressed the view that 
acceptances should now be made on the basis of the assurances given 
by the BBC to follow through on the necessary renovations. There 
was general agreement with this view and approval of the Board of 
Trustees was given to the Medical School to begin accepting stu- 
dents at this time. 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous ■ 
Meeting 



Medical 

School 

Report 



Medical 

School 

Acceptances 



3282 



Medical 

School 

Tuition 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings & 
Grounds 

Medical 
School 

Power 
Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Tuition charges for the Medical School were next discussed 
A brochure sent out to prospective students as of June 15, 1969 gave 
the projected figure of $200 with the reservation that this was sub- 
ject to change by the Board. Trustee Crowley felt that the Trustees 
should adhere to this figure. 

During the ensuing discussion, it was brought out that 
Medical School students would have a distinct advantage over other 
students in terms of the much larger per student investment by the 
Commonwealth in their education, and in the resultant greater oppor- 
tunity for financial reward. It was generally felt that the tuition 
should be set at a level comparable to the national average of $600 
for state medical schools - which is substantially lower than that 
of private institutions. On the basis of charging a more realistic 
tuition fee, scholarship aid could be provided where it is needed. 

Dr. Saunders pointed out that no registration fees or 
acceptance deposits are required. The only other proposed fees are 
a microscope rental fee of $35 and a student health fee which has 
not yet been established. Cost of books and supplies is estimated 
at $200. Projected tuition for non-residents is now projected at 
$2000, but there are to be no non-resident students the first year. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the tuition at the University of Massa- 
chusetts School of Medicine be set at $600 
per academic year for residents of the 
Commonwealth. 

The Chairman next requested the report of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. Chairman Haigis noted that preliminary plans 
for two Medical School buildings are now ready for presentation to 
the Board. Messrs. Aldrich and Mendell of Campbell, Aldrich and 
Nulty, Inc. were present for discussion of the power plant, a model 
of which was displayed. Mr. Aldrich pointed out details of the de- 
sign. This is basically a structure with a nearly black, reflective 
aluminum exterior with a contrasting smoke stack of self-rusting 
steel. The final color choice for the exterior walls is to have 
further consideration, as Trustee Knowles has expressed reservations 
on the darkness of the building. Mr. Aldrich recommends a decidedly 
dark exterior as being simple and dignified and adding elegance to 
the structure. 

Trustee Troy asked if there were any black buildings 
actually in existence. Mr. Mendell replied that the concept of the 
power plant is aesthetically similar to one at O'Hare Field in 
Chicago. Mr. Mendell also noted that the interior of the power 
plant will be color-coded, providing vibrant and exciting contrast 
to the exterior. 

The location of the power plant was discussed, with 
Mr. Aldrich noting that the location, some 200 feet from Lake 



3283 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Quinsigamond, had been dictated by the exigencies of the site and by 
future space requirements. All aspects of pollution control have 
been handled satisfactorily. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the plans for the power plant for 

the Medical School as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, 
Inc., except for the mechanicals and with 
possible reservation as to color of the ex- 
terior of the building. 

Trustee Haigis next introduced Mr. Moyes of Ritchie 
Associates who presented the elevations for the teaching hospital. 
These showed location of patient, emergency, visitor and service 
entrances as well as the administrative offices, surgery, X-ray and 
laboratories. It was pointed out that each section of the hospital 
ties in directly with the corresponding teaching facility in the 
medical science building. The top floor is mechanical, so de- 
signed that if there is an addition of four floors to the building 
in the future, the service equipment will be centrally located. 

The exterior of the teaching hospital is to be a brownish 
gray granite, which will exactly match the medical science build- 
ing. Trim will be anodized aluminum. 

After further brief discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the plans for the exterior design 
of the Teaching Hospital of the School of 
Medicine as presented by the architectural 
firms of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, Inc., 
and Ritchie Associates. 

Turning to the UM/Boston building program, Chairman 
Haigis noted that architects for the six major buildings - Phase I 
have been selected. Space and budget allocations for three of 
these buildings - the library, administration and central supply 
building - were presented at the meeting of the Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds . Space programs for the other three are not yet 
ready for review. Mr. Haigis noted that the colleges are very ex- 
pensive buildings and that detailed Trustee review will be necessary 

After further discussion, it was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the space and budget allocations 
for the library, administration and supply 
buildings at UM/Boston (Documents T70-038, 
T70-040 and T70-041) providing that multiple 
use of the library is planned and that 
progress is kept consonant with cost. 



Medical 
School 

Teaching 
Hospital 



UM/Boston 

Building 

Program 



3284 



TRUSTEE 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Future 
Housing 
UM/ Amherst 



Building 
Authority 

Thirteenth 
Project 



Married 
Student 

Housing 
UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : That the design of the colleges for UM/Boston 
at Columbia Point be submitted in advance for 
Trustee study and review before approval is 
given. 

A feasibility study of future housing needs, UM/ Amherst, 
is recommended. The firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc., 
is willing to undertake this survey and to report by April 1, 1970. 
After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To retain the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Inc. for the purposes of con- 
ducting a Feasibility Study for Future Stu- 
dent Housing - UM/ Amherst. 

A proposed policy change on rental of the Lincoln and Uni- 
versity Apartments, Chairman Haigis noted, will come up at a later 
meeting. 

The proposal that the Language Laboratories UM/ Amherst be 
named for the long-time director of this outstanding facility was 
next discussed. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To name the Language Laboratories, 

UM/ Amherst, in memory of James Butler. 

For the University Building Authority , Mr. Broadhurst 
distributed material regarding the Thirteenth Project of the 
Authority: to provide approximately 240 units of housing (primarily 
for married students) at the UM/ Amherst campus. Upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : " WHEREAS University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority (the "Authority") is authorized by 
Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended, 
(said Chapter 773 as amended being hereinafter 
referred to as the "Enabling Act") among other 
things, to construct buildings and structures 
upon written request made by authority of the 
Trustees (the "Trustees") of the University of 
Massachusetts (the "University") and upon de- 
termination by the Trustees that a project is 
designed primarily to provide facilities for, 
among other things, the housing, feeding, 
medical care or extracurricular use by Univer- 
sity students, staff and dependents; 

" BE IT RESOLVED that Joseph P. Healey, Chairman 
of the Trustees, be and he hereby is authorized 
in the name and on behalf of the Trustees to 
make a written request of the Authority that it 



I 



TRUSTEE 



3285 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

undertake a project to provide housing facilities 
at the campus of the University in the towns of 
Amherst and Hadley to contain approximately 240 
units, of which approximately one-half shall be 
one bedroom units and the remainder shall be two 
bedroom units, to be occupied primarily by stu- 
dents at the University and their dependents and 
that the undertaking by the Authority of such 
project to provide such facilities and the pro- 
vision and installation by the Authority with 
respect to or in said project of furnishings, 
furniture, machinery, equipment and facilities 
and such related approaches, driveways, parking 
areas, planting and landscaping as may hereafter 
be approved gy authority of the Trustees be and 
the same hereby is determined to be a project 
designed primarily for the housing of University 
students and staff and their dependents." 

The estimates of costs, expenses and required revenues 
set a maximum cost for the project of $4,000,000. It is the hope 
and expectation of the Authority, Mr. Broadhurst said, that this 
limit will not be reached. In the event that costs reach the maxi- 
mum, the rent per unit per month will be approximately $150. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the making of a Contract for Financial 

Assistance between The Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts and University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 
of the Acts of 1960 as amended and pertaining 
to the undertaking by the Authority of a 
project to provide housing facilities at the 
campus of the University in the towns of 
Amherst and Hadley to contain approximately 
240 units and the doing by the Authority of 
certain other work as authorized by said 
Chapter as amended, and being the work re- 
quested by authority of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts on December 15, 
1969, be and the same hereby is authorized; 
that the form of such Contract for Financial 
Assistance presented to this meeting and each 
term, condition and provision therein con- 
tained be and the same hereby are approved; 
that said Trustees or a majority thereof be 
and hereby are authorized, in the name and 
on behalf of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to sign, acknowledge if deemed advisable and 
deliver a Contract for Financial Assistance 
in the form presented to this meeting and pro- 
viding for a Maximum Cost of the Thirteenth 



3286 



TRUSTEE 



Report of 
Committee 
on Finance 



Stephen Davis 
Endowment 
Fund - 
Revision 



Cash 

Variance 

Amherst 



Hodgkins 
Cove 



Alumni Funds - 
Authorization 
to handle as 
Trust Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Project, as defined in said Contract, of 
Four Million Dollars ($4,000,000) and to 
cause the common seal of said University 
and of said Trustees to be affixed thereto; 
and that the taking of such action by said 
Trustees shall be conclusive evidence that 
the same is hereby authorized and that the 
form of Contract for Financial Assistance 
so executed is as hereby authorized and 
approved. " 

Trustee Pumphret next presented the Report of the Finance 
Committee , as detailed in the minutes of the meeting of December 1, 
1969. In summary, Chairman Pumphret noted that it is planned to in- 
crease the University's investment position to 707o of equity, and that 
a decision has been made to transfer 507 o of various savings account 
balances to higher yielding federal paper. He noted also that on 
the recommendation of financial advisors, all future gifts of securi- 
ties would be sold upon receipt except those recommended for reten- 
tion. On further business, requiring action by the full Board of 
Trustees, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the Stephen Davis Scholarship Fund, 
accepted by the Board of Trustees at its 
meeting of January 10, 1957, be revised 
by changing the scholarship specifications 
from one recipient to one or more recipients. 

It was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That transfer of $60.61 from the Trust Fund 
Interest Account be made to restore the 
shortage in the Amherst Petty Cash Fund 
Account for Fiscal Year 1969. 

It was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the expenditure of up to 
$15,000 from trust fund interest pur- 
suant to the proposed agreement with 
the University of Massachusetts Founda- 
tion, Inc. re Hodgkins Cove Property. 

It was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to handle 
Alumni Funds as Trust Funds. 

In conclusion, Trustee Pumphret noted that the Quarterly 
Report of the Treasurer had been presented to the committee and that 
minor revisions had been suggested in the format of future reports 
He also noted that UM/Boston was overcommitted on percentage of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

budget allocation expended and that this would be discussed with 
the UM/Boston administration. Necessary transfers between sub- 
sidiary accounts were made as follows: 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make the 
following transfers between subsidiary 
accounts at UM/ Amherst: 

From Account 09 to Account 05 - $2,000; also 
From Account 09 to Account 15 - $3,000 for 
the purpose of providing clothing and equip- 
ment for security guards. 

It was also 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to make the 
following transfers between subsidiary 
accounts at UM/Worcester: 

From Account 1350-38-01 to 1350-38-03 the 
sum of $30,000 to fund cost of consultants; 
also 

From Account 1350-38-13 to 1350-38-16 the 
sum of $2,500 to fund the cost of snow re- 
moval at the Shaw Building. 

Trustee Lyons next reported for the Committee on Student 
Activities . He noted that the request of the student radio station 
WMUA to apply for an increase of power to 1,000 watts, which had 
been referred back for study last spring is now recommended by the 
University Broadcasting Council and the Committee on Student Acti- 
vities, on the condition that a part-time professional consultant 
be employed for training in broadcast programming and management. 
The license is to be retained by the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Stadlen, manager of WMUA, was present and expressed 
the appreciation of the staff for this action by the Board. He 
also expressed awareness of the obligations and responsibility 
placed on WMUA in representation of the Trustees and the Univer- 
sity. Chairman Healey noted that WMUA is presenting the "image" 
of the University and the Commonwealth when on the airways and that 
the Board expects students to live up to the highest standards 
when operating under the aegis of the University. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That permission be granted to student radio 
station WMUA to apply for an increase in 
power to 1,000 watts, contingent upon the 



3287 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 

UM/Amherst 



UM/Worcester 



WMUA - 

Power 

Increase 



3288 



TRUSTEE 

Student 

Senate 

Constitution 



SWAP 
Conference 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

action of the station in securing the ser- 
vices of a professional consultant in broad- 
cast programming and management. 

Chairman Lyons also reported that the constitution pre- 
sented to the Student Activities Committee by the leaders of student 
government needs clarification on some points. It developed that 
the constitution had not been discussed with the administration, 
and that, after further revision and administrative review, it would 
again come before the committee. 

Mr. Lyons noted that the procedures set up at the Board 
meeting of November 14, 1969 for presentation of security proposals 
by the individual residence halls is apparently progressing satis- 
factorily. He commented that the SWAP Conference had resulted in 
some very satisfactory conversation and increased understanding. 

Trustee Gordon introduced a resolution commending the 
SWAP Committee for their invitation to the Board to attend the 
November 14 conference and for providing the opportunity for so much 
meaningful dialogue in such a professional manner. The conference 
resulted in a much better understanding of student problems and the 
student point of view. It is hoped that similar dialogue can be 
continued with this and with other groups representing responsible 
student thought. 

Trustee Lambson heartily agreed with these remarks and 
added the thought that he was very impressed with the attendance in 
Lee, especially since the meeting coincided with the weekend of 
Moratorium activity in Washington. 

Chairman Healey suggested making a formal expression of 
the Board of Trustees, and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: That the Board of Trustees hereby expresses 
to the SWAP Committee its appreciation and 
commendation for providing the occasion of 
meaningful dialogue and exchange of views 
between students and members of the Faculty, 
Administration and Board of Trustees at the 
November SWAP Conference in South Lee, 
Massachusetts; also, that the Board of 
Trustees urges that occasions may be 
structured in the future which will provide 
for a continuation of this exchange of views. 

Chairman Healey presented the Personnel Actions for 
approval. Provost Tippo noted one correction on page three of the 
Presidential Appointments: Professor Wogrin should have been 
designated Acting Head, and not Head of Computer Science. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Actions 

as detailed in Document T70-037, which document 
is herewith attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. (Also Supplement #1) 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential Appoint- 
ments Without Tenure, for the period November 15, 
1969 to December 15, 1969 as detailed in Document 
T70-037A, which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, salary 
range and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the pro- 
fessional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position Titles 
effective on and after January 2, 1970 as de- 
tailed in Document T70-043, which document is here- 
with attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles under 
the provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific weekly 
salary rate which shall not be changed except by 
vote of the Board of Trustees and such classifica- 
tion shall not be designated by any job group 
number or grade. 



The meeting was adjourned 




Rob 
Secretar 



J. McCartney 
Board of Trusted 




3289 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



3290 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 30, 1970, 2:00 p.m., Parlor B, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Chandler, Croce, 
Crowley, Greenblatt, Haigis, Knowles, 
Lambson, Lyons, Maginnis, Olken, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Swefg, Troy, Weldon, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Provost Tippo, Dean Gugin, 
Professors Korson and Reid, Mrs. Hull. 
From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Dean 
Gagnon, Mr. Cass, Mr. O'Brien, Pro- 
fessors Broderick and Weaver. 
From UM/W : Dean Soutter, James 
McGuire '74. 
Mr. Melley ana members of the press. 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees being pre- 
sent and acting throughout, the formal session of the Board was 
convened by Chairman Healey at 2:00 p.m. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were presented for 
approval. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 

the Board of Trustees for December 15, 1969. 

The Chairman called for the President's Comments . Presi- 
dent Lederle commended the Board for its record activity during 
January with eleven sub-committee meetings held, and today's meet- 
ing making the twelfth meeting of the month. The President ex- 
pressed his great appreciation for "the hardest working Board of 
Trustees in the country." 

The President noted the happy news that Dean Soutter is 
to announce the first student accepted for the entering class of 
sixteen at the Medical School. Dean Soutter then presented Mr. 
James L. McGuire of Dedham who is a senior pre-medical student at 
UMass/Amherst . Mr. McGuire spoke briefly of his pleasure to be 
representing the Commonwealth and the University of Massachusetts 
in this endeavor which, he said, would not have been possible with- 
out the supporting effort of the Legislature and the Board of 
Trustees. Mr. McGuire also spoke of the great and increasing need 
for doctors within the Commonwealth and the long-time need for a 
state medical school. In response to a question, Mr. McGuire said 
that he had withdrawn the sixteen applications he had filed with 
other medical schools, all of which had progressed to the final 
interview stage, in favor of the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School and "the opportunity to pioneer at an institution I 
am sure will become one of the country's fine medical schools." 



3291 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Medical 
School - 
Acceptance 
of First 
Student 



*J&d& 



Collective 
Bargaining 

UM/ Amherst 

TRUSTEE 

Supplement - 
Agreement of 
May 12, 1969 

Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Black 
Studies 
Program 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the area of Collective Bargaining - Amherst, President 
Lederle stated that he would proceed to implement the University's 
obligations on the proposed Collective Bargaining Agreement between 
UM/Amherst and Local 1776 and Council 41 of the AFL-CIO for Unit 3, 
Service and Maintenance Employees, as authorized by the Trustees 
November 21, 1966. This is a supplementary to the Master Agreement 
of May 12, 1969. Copies of this agreement had been previously 
circulated to members of the Board for their comment and review. 

The Report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was given by Committee Chairman Troy. On January 8, 1970 the 
committee met with members of the UM/Boston Afro-American Society 
for discussion of the Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Afro- 
American Studies. Also present were Professor Gittleman and Mr. 
Joseph Peltier, Co-chairmen of the Study Committee, and Trustee 
Snowden. The second topic planned for discussion: Status of Black 
Faculty Membmers UM/Boston was rescheduled, due to lack of time, 
for a subsequent meeting in February. 

Trustee Troy termed the discussion "frank and illuminat- 
ing." The students, he said were impressive in their concern for 
early establishment of a relevant and significant Program of Black 
Studies at UM/Boston. Such a program would be considered, inci- 
dentally, an addition to and not a substitute for, a traditional 
liberal arts education. A cooperative program among Brandeis, 
Boston University, Boston College, Harvard, Northeastern and UMass/ 
Boston was also discussed. This coalition has the initial backing 
of the Ford Foundation and it is hoped that it will result in an 
eventual coordinated major in Black Studies in the Boston area. 



Chancellor Broderick has praised the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Afro-American Studies and has hoped for its implementation 
"with an appropriate sense of urgency." The students were insistent, 
however, that implementation of the proposal was lagging, with 
little or no action being taken. It was their strongly expressed 
opinion that the introductory courses in the core curriculum should 
include far more material relevant to the general understanding of 
the black experience and the non-Western contribution to human 
culture than is presently the case. The Study Committee has pro- 
posed beginning a concentration in Black Studies in 1970-71, with 
some introductory courses at a junior-senior level to be offered in 
the spring semester 1970. 

The committee, Trustee Troy said, had agreed with the 
student viewpoint while at the same time recognizing the remarkable 
achievement of the UM/Boston faculty and administration in building 
an excellent curriculum in Arts and Sciences which provides the in- 
dispensable base for such programs as Black and Human Studies. 

President Lederle has urged the calling to the attention 
of the Boston faculty of the original strong mandate of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Boston to build a "truly urban 
institution. " 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee is presenting the following statement with 
the hope that the UM/Boston faculty and administration will respond 
with a greater sense of urgency to the expressed needs and inter- 
ests of our black students: 

The Trustees, having met with the Afro-American Society 
of the University of Massachusetts at Boston on two 
occasions recently, record their enthusiasm for the Pro- 
gram of African Studies already approved by the Faculty 
Senate but note with concern the view of the Afro- 
American Society that the Faculty and Administration of 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston shows an in- 
sufficient sense of urgency in the implementation of the 
program. The Trustees would welcome more rapid response 
to the suggestions made in the Report and they instruct 
the Chancellor to report at the May meeting on changes 
made and proposed. The Trustees also wish to express to 
the Faculty and Administration their concern that the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston recall its mandate 
to become a genuinely urban university and they instruct 
the Chancellor to report to them at a later date on 
progress made in the development of an Urban Studies 
Program. 

Another point of concern with the committee, it should be 
noted, is that action be taken to recruit distinguished black 
scholars to the faculty to ensure the effectiveness of the program. 

Trustee Troy next reviewed the meeting of the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy on January 19, 1970. Sabbatical 
Leave Recommendations for 1970-71 were discussed. The very firmly 
defined and executed policies determining the granting of such 
leave was reviewed with Provost Tippo. The committee recommends 
approval. After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the Sabbatical Leave Recommenda- 
tions for 1970-1971 as submitted by the 
Provost and detailed in Document T70-057. 

The committee had reviewed the recommended Merit Increases 
Faculty - 1970-1971. The elaborate procedures formulated for these 
increases was detailed by the Provost. It was also established that 
the University of Massachusetts salary scale is in line with that of 
comparable institutions. Upon further discussion and on motion made 
and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the Merit Increase Recommendations 
for 1970-1971 as submitted by the Provost and 
detailed in Document T70-058. 

Recommendations for Promotions for UM/Amherst and UM/ 
Boston were reviewed and criteria, standards and methods used in 
determining promotions were discussed by the committee. Approval 
is recommended. It was then moved, seconded, and 



3293 



Sabbatical 
Leave 

Recommendat ions 
1970-1971 



Merit 
Increase 
Recommendations 
1970-1971 



Promotions 
UM/Amherst 
UM/Boston 



3294 



TRUSTEE 

Named Chair - 
Department of 
Government - 
V. 0. Key 



Faculty 
Senate 
UM/ Amherst 

Statement on 

University 

Governance 

Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Merit In- 
creases - 
Management 
Area - UM/A, 
UM/B, UM/W 



Authorization 
for Treasurer 
to Sign 
Contracts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the Recommendations for Pro- 
motions as submitted for UM/Amherst and 
UM/Boston and as detailed in Documents 
T70-059 and T70-060. 

The proposal that a Chair be established in the Department 
of Government and named for the distinguished political scientist, 
Professor V. 0. Key, was discussed by President Lederle . It was 
proposed that Professor William Havard be named to the Chair, in 
recognition of his outstanding service to the University. After 
further general discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To establish a Professorship at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Amherst in the 
Department of Government in honor of the 
eminent political scientist, Professor 
V. 0. Key, and to name Professor William 
Havard to the Chair. 

The committee had discussed, with Professor Bruce Morris 
and other members of the Faculty Senate, that body's statement on 
University Governance. This matter is to be studied by the Execu- 
tive Committee within the context of the reorganization of the Uni- 
versity system. Trustee Troy noted that the committee had urged 
that the Faculty Senate statement be rewritten with a view to pre- 
cision of language and general clarity. 

Chairman Healey reported for the Executive Committee, 
which had met on January 20th. Needing action by the Board is the 
matter of Merit Increases - Management Area - Amherst, Boston, 
Worcester. The committee has thoroughly reviewed all figures with 
the administration and recommends approval. After further dis- 
cussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the Merit Increases - Manage- 
ment Area 1970-1971 - Amherst, Boston, 
Worcester, as detailed in Document 
T70-058. 

In order to expedite the function of the Treasurer in 
situations requiring specific authority, Chairman Healey noted, it 
is recommended that authorization to sign contracts be given to 
Treasurer Johnson. It was therefore moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
of the University of Massachusetts, to 
execute contracts and all other instruments 
for and in behalf of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts as his duties 
as Treasurer may from time to time require 
him to so execute. 



3295 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



One final item of business from the Executive Committee 
agenda involved the proposal from the Board of Higher Education to 
consider a change in the proposed title structure for the Univer- 
sity system: to designate the head of the system as Chancellor and 
the heads of the individual campuses as Presidents. After 
discussion of the matter, it had been decided to retain the titles 
as originally proposed. This is in agreement with a majority of 
state university systems. 

Trustee Haigis next presented the Report of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds for their meetings of January 8 and 
January 20, 1970. The discussions on January 8, with Trustee 
Crowley as Acting Chairman, had revolved mainly around the space 
programs and land acquisition at Columbia Point. 

Chancellor Broderick, at Trustee Haigis' request, re- 
viewed the presentation of Space Programs for Buildings 010, 020 
and 080. These reduced programs are the result of much detailed 
work by Mr. O'Brien and a faculty committee headed by Professor 
Weaver. Mr. Pumphret commended the administration and faculty at 
UM/Boston for the "extremely good presentation" of the reduced 
space programs at the committee meeting, especially in view of 
limited staff and the necessity of meeting deadlines. 

Chairman Haigis stated that "The Committee is in agree- 
ment that the space recommendations are reasonable and progress is 
being made." He recommended approval of the space programs for the 
three buildings under discussion. (Space programs for the other 
three buildings in Phase I - Columbia Point - have been previously 
approved.) After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : To approve the revised Space Programs for 
Columbia Point as detailed in the Space 
and Budget Summary Revisions of January 19, 
1970 for Building 010 (Document T70-050) ; 
Building 020 (Document T70-051) ; and Build - 
ing 080 (Document T70-052) (and based on 
complete building programs as contained in 
basic documents T70-063; T70-064; and 
T70-065). 

Chairman Haigis noted the complicated situation involved 
in the acquisition of Parcel (B) at Columbia Point and presented a 
change in the recommended vote for this land acquisition. There 
was discussion of the fact that the University has an informal 
understanding with the City of Boston that the University would 
join the City of Boston in asking the Legislature for permission to 
reconvey this land if the City of Boston found a developer within 
the three years from the effective date of the Act. In any case, 
the University agreed to refrain from building on this site for a 



BHE Proposal 
Title Change 
University 
System 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 



Space 
Program - 
Buildings 
010, 020 
and 080 
Columbia 
Point 



Parcel (B) 



3296 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

period of three years from the date of the Act. Decision was made 
to support this original position taken in the discussions with the 
City of Boston. The matter may come before the legislature, and 
there is the possibility that the legislature may specify that the 
land is to be used for University purposes. If the legislature 
fails to act on the City of Boston's request this year, the Uni- 
versity regards its understanding with the City as terminated. 



After further discussion and on motion made and seconded. 



it was 



Statement - 
Educational 
Plan - 

Columbia Point 
Phase I of 
Development 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
in accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490- 
0102 of the Acts of 1969, and all other 
acts, authorizing the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity to acquire land, or land with build- 
ings thereon, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the development of the University of 
Massachusetts at Columbia Point in the City 
of Boston; independent appraisals having 
been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Vice-Chancellor 
William R. Hamilton, Jr. ; the Trustees of 
the University take by eminent domain in 
fee, a parcel of land now or formerly 
owned by the City of Boston and designated 
as Parcel (B) on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Land in Boston, (Dorchester) Mass.," sur- 
veyed by New England Survey Services, Inc., 
October 6, 1969 (Document T70-027) , and 
that the sum of $225,166.00 be and hereby 
is awarded as damages for Parcel (B) , and 
that Robert J. McCartney, Secretary, Board 
of Trustees, is hereby authorized to sign 
the order of taking for and in the name of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Chancellor Broderick also noted that a statement had been 
prepared, at the request of the Commissioner of Administration and 
Finance, which defines the Educational Plan for the First Phase of 
Development at Columbia Point. (Document T70-070) This statement 
was then distributed to the members of the Board. 

Chairman Haigis recommended approval of the Feasibility 
Study - Infirmary Addition UM/ Amherst, which had been discussed by 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds on January 8. After general 
discussion of this project, it was moved, seconded and 



! l 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the Phase I, Feasibility Study 
for the Infirmary Addition UM/ Amherst as 
submitted by the architectural firm of 
Goody and Clancy, at a total project cost 
of $1,368,000 based on 1969 construction 
costs and subject to availability of BBC 
inflationary contingency funds. 

A Feasibility Study - Mathematics and Physics - Graduate 
Research Center UM/ Amherst is also recommended after study by the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds on January 8. The architectural 
firm of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty has estimated the cost of this 
project at $10,355,000. The gross square footage estimate is 
161,000, @ $47.00 G.S.F. After further discussion and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the Feasibility Study for Phase II - 
Mathematics and Physics Towers (Document 
T70-048) of the Graduate Research Center as 
presented by the architectural firm of 
Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, Inc. at a total 
project cost of $10,355,000 based on 1969 
construction costs and subject to availability 
of BBC inflationary contingency funds. 

After discussion, it was also 

VOTED : WHEREAS University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority (the "Authority") is authorized 
by Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended 
by Chapter 736 of the Acts of 1962, by Chapter 
684 of the Acts of 1963, by Chapter 845 of the 
Acts of 1965, by Chapter 670 of the Acts of 
1966, by Chapter 344 and 400 of the Acts of 
1968, and by Chapter 638 of the Acts of 1969 
(said Chapter 773 as so amended being herein- 
after referred to as the "Enabling Act"), 
among other things, to construct buildings 
and structures upon written request made by 
authority of the Trustees (the "Trustees") 
of the University of Massachusetts (the "Uni- 
versity") and upon determination by the 
Trustees that a project is designed primarily 
to provide facilities for, among other things, 
the housing, feeding, medical care or extra 
curricular use by University students, staff 
and dependents; Now, Therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED That John W. Lederle, Presi- 
dent of the University, be and he hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of the 
Trustees to make a written request of the 



3297 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Infirmary 
Addition 
UM/Amherst 



Feasibility 

Study - 

Graduate 

Research 

Center 

UM/Amherst 



Mathematics 
and Physics 



Feasibility 
Study - Dining 
Halls - UM/A - 

Orchard Hill 



3298 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Authority that it construct a building 
or buildings to be used as a multi- 
purpose dining facility in the vicinity 
of the Orchard Hill Dormitories having 
a capacity of approximately 650 seats 
so as to feed approximately 1,300 stu- 
dents at each meal on the basis of two 
sittings for the use of the University, 
its students, staff and their dependents, 
including those uses referred to in 
Section 3 of the Enabling Act; that the 
construction by the Authority of said 
building or buildings and the provision 
and installation by the Authority with 
respect to or in said building or build- 
ings of furnishings, furniture, machinery, 
equipment and facilities and such related 
approaches, driveways, parking areas, 
planting and landscaping as may hereafter 
be approved by authority of the Trustees 
be and' the same hereby is determined to 
be a project designed primarily for the 
feeding and extra-curricular use of Uni- 
versity students, staff and dependents. 

It was also 



Belchertown 
Pomology 
Storage 
Building - 
Final Plans 



VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifica- 
tions as presented by the architectural 
firm of James A. Britton of Greenfield, 
Massachusetts for the construction of 
the Belchertown Pomology Storage Build- 
ing subject to availability of BBC 
inflationary contingency funds. 
(Document T70-049) 



Rental of 
More Space 
UM/ Bos ton 

and 

Renovations - 
100 Arlington 
Street 



Two final items were recommended by Trustee Haigis: 
Rental of More Space and Renovations - 100 Arlington Street, UMass/ 
Boston. These had been exhaustively discussed on January 8 at the 
meeting of the Buildings and Grounds Committee. Chancellor 
Broderick summarized the background for these additional space re- 
quirements. Hopefully this will be the final expansion at Park 
Square. The Commissioner of Administration and Finance has been 
assured that these plans will carry UM/Boston through, with the 
addition of 500 students in 1970 and 500 in 1971, to reach a pro- 
jected limit of 4500 students at the Park Square site. The expecta- 
tion is to be at Columbia Point in 1972 with 500 students. If de- 
layed, enrollment at Park Square will be held at 4500 students. 



Trustee Rowland wished the record to show that all leases 
will be terminated at the time of the move to Columbia Point. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further general discussion of these space require- 
ments for UM/Boston, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize a special capital outlay 
request for Fiscal 1970 in the amount 
of $950,000 for the purpose of renova- 
tions at UM/Boston, 100 Arlington 
Street, for the purpose of accepting 
500 additional students in each of the 
next two years . 

It was further 



3299 



VOTED : That authorization be obtained through 

an appropriation for the lease of approxi- 
mately 54,000 square feet of floor space 
for a period of three years to accommodate 
an enrollment increase of 500 students in 
each of the next two years, and that the 
sum of $14,000 be requested as a special 
appropriation for this purpose for the 
current fiscal year. 

Chairman Healey reported for the Committee on Government 
and University Relations in the absence of Trustee Gordon. Chair- 
man Healey noted that several proposals are before the committee 
and that action and progress will be reported at a later date. Mr. 
Cass will continue to report on the status of current legislation. 

Trustee Maginnis, Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee to 
Advise on Selection of a President** gave that committee's report. 

Stressing that the committee had an advisory role only, 
Trustee Maginnis reviewed the procedures taken since the organiza- 
tional meeting of September 5, 1969. Eight advisory groups were 
formed, representing all segments of the University community: 
Alumni Association, Amherst; Alumni Association, Boston; Facralty- 
Administration, Boston; Graduate Students, Amherst; Undergraduate 
Students, Amherst and Undergraduate Students, Boston. List of 
prospective candidates were drawn up by each of these committees 
and submitted to the Trustee Committee by December 1, 1969. A 
complete alphabetized list of all candidates containing 196 names 
was then compiled and returned to the separate advisory committees 
on all campuses on December 10, 1969. At that time each group was 
requested to submit a short list of not more than 20 names to the 
Trustee Committee by January 2, 1970. These lists were combined 
into a master list containing 84 names and labeled CONFIDENTIAL. 

Meetings were held with each campus group: January 12, 
1970 in Amherst, and January 14, 1970 in Boston for the purpose of 
reviewing in depth the candidates proposed by each committee. The 



Report of 
Committee on 
Government & 
University 
Relations 

Report of 
Committee to 
Advise on 
Selection of 
a President 



3300 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



Report of 

Building 

Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



committee itself met on January 19, 1970 for review of a revised 
list of 82 names. Committee members were asked to prepare indivi- 
dual lists from these names of 10 to 12 persons. Meeting again on 
January 23, 1970, a final list of nominees was considered. In 
making the selections, no rigid criteria had been followed but such 
factors as age, (40-55 looked upon most favorably) university ad- 
ministrative experience, stature in the academic community and 
public style had been important considerations. With encouraging 
unanimity among Trustee committee members shown, a final list of 
eight individuals, ranked in order of priority, had been presented 
to the Board with a back-up list of additional names for further 
consideration. 

The committee gratefully acknowledges the valuable 
assistance of Dr. Charles Page who placed his long experience in 
the nation-wide academic community at its disposal. Committee 
members: Dennis M. Crowley, Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles, Lorenzo D. 
Lambson, Calvin H. Plimpton, Mrs. George R. Rowland, John J. 
Maginnis, Chairman. 

Chairman Healey expressed the gratitude of the Board to 
the members of the committee for the monumental job they had done 
in refining the lists to one of workable size and in enlisting wide 
participation in the search for presidential candidates. A special 
meeting of the Board will be called on February 9, 1970 at 4:00 p.m. 
for further deliberation on selection procedure. 

Trustee Lyons next reported as delegate to the Board of 
Higher Education. No issue, he said, of special importance to the 
Board of Trustees had been discussed at recent meetings except the 
capital outlay request for Arlington Street which had been discussed 
earlier by the Trustees. The new Chancellor is now operating from 
his Boston office and is soon to give his views on open enrollment. 
Appreciation is expressed to the University for its willingness to 
complete the basic library project which resulted in an additional 
$40,000 being available for books to state institutions. 

Dean Gugin, as spokesman for the President on the Advisory 
Commission to the Board of Higher Education is making an "extremely 
important contribution on complicated issues coming before the 
Board," Trustee Lyons said. 

Reporting for the Building Authority, Trustee Pumphret re 
viewed progress made on modular housing for the UM/A Married Student 
Housing Project. Results have been encouraging, with a contractor 
interested in making a "very low" bid. This project is expected to 
provide very attractive housing. Trustee Pumphret will report de- 
tails at the next meeting of the Board. 

President Lederle presented the Personnel Actions for 
approval. These had been previously circulated to the Board and 
their approval is recommended. 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Actions 
as detailed in Document T70-054, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve and confirm the Presidential 

Appointments Without Tenure, for the period 
December 16, 1969 to January 30, 1970, as 
detailed in Document T70-054A, which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with 
respect to professional personnel under pro- 
visions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as 
amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classifica- 
tion, salary range and descriptive job specifi- 
cation for each position to which a member of the 
professional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 
Titles effective on and after January 2, 
1970 as detailed in Document T70-055, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly 
salary range from a minimum to a maximum 
or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by vote 
of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 



The meeting was adjourn 



3301 



Personnel 
Actions 



Presidential 
Appointments 
Without 
Tenure 




RoWrt J. McCart 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



3302 



List of 
Nominees for 
Presidency 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 9, 1970, 4:00 p.m., Room 436, Statler Hilton Hotel 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Chart! ler, C rcPe, Crowley, 
Frechette, Gordon, Greenblatt, Knowles, 
Lambson, Lyons, Maginnis, Olken, Pumphret, 
Rowland, Sweig, Troy and Weldon; Secretary 
McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Mr. Page 

The meeting was convened at 4:15 p.m. by Chairman Healey. 
The single item was Consideration of List of Nominees for the Presi 
dency of the University. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 
of discussing nominees for the Presidency of 
the University. 

The meeting recessed for dinner at 6:05 p.m. and was re- 
convened by Chairman Healey at 7:30 p.m. 

At 8:15 p.m. it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the pur- 
pose of carrying on with the business of the 
meeting. 

After extensive discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That a group of Trustees (and other persons as 
appropriate) be appointed by Chairman Healey 
to approach individually, and in priority order 
as determined in executive session, five 
nominees on a list of persons the Trustees have 
declared eligible for consideration as the next 
President of the University. 



The meeting was adjourned at 8 





J. McCartsTey 
Board of /Trustees 






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